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AMQmom

Ideas To Fill Up 7 Year Old?

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My 1st grader (almost 2nd grader) has EE on top of celiac. She has severe food allergies and I was wondering if any of you had ideas for making snacks that fill her up. Right now, I am experimenting with Chebe products. Here is the thing...she is dairy free, allergic to legumes (including soy), allergic to corn, grains, coconut, sesame, tree nuts, carrots, squash, cauliflower, sunflower butter/nuts - I think that about covers it. She was eating all things until her 7th birthday a few weeks ago (when diagnosed). It was her behavior, not her physical pain, that was a symptom. I totally understand if there are no takers on this question, but if you have any ideas about baking with tapioca, potato, amaranth, and/or quinoa flour I would really appreciate it! She can have little amounts of corn and rice and coconut here and there.

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I love the Brazilian cheese rolls. theres a recipe on the board somewhere, or you can just google one. I think some people make them dairy free. Try stuffing some with bits of cooked sausage or something and sticking them in the freezer (before cooking), then bake as normal, or maybe a little longer, until brownish on top.

My box of potato starch has an angel food cake recipe, although I've never tried it.

Also, how was she diagnosed allergic to all these things? The only reliable method of testing is through elimination diets. It may be that she can eat more of those things than you realize.


"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"

- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.

- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

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I am not sure what EE is.

My daughter was diagnosed at age 6 and with her, it was mainly her behavior that led to her diagnosis. Looking back I can now see that all her sinus and ear infections and upset tummy was also related to the allergies.

You have a tough one with corn because it is in so many things. You may have to make a lot of soup or things with potatoes or sweet potatoes. Ener-G makes a tapioca bread that my daughter likes.

I don't know if this would work for you or not. My friend's daughter is allergic to so many things, like yours, that she found she could not totally eliminate them. So she has her on a rotation diet, giving her say, cheese once every two weeks. That would not work for my daughter because she gets so ill when she eats an allergen, but it seems to work for my friend's daughter with the exception of eggs. She wound up in the hospital with swollen eyes from eggs.

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Thank you for your replies! I really appreciate it. EE is a condition with her esophagus - basically, her esophagus swells anytime she eats an allergen. This leads to scar tissue and the possibility of needing a feeding device or protein drinks due to an inability to swallow later in life. I will look up the brazilian cheese rolls and try it dairy free. The other question asked was about discovering the allergies - we have a GI doctor for the celiac and an allergist for the EE. She had a battery of tests to see what we need to avoid in order to avoid swelling. She is a trooper! I am really bummed because we just found out about sunflower and coconut - I was using a lot of those products as alternatives. We loved the bars from Enjoy Life but no more of those - sunflower butter! Hopefully she will outgrow this - I think that her allergies are heightened because she was reacting to her celiac conditions. It only gets better with time, eh?!?

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My 1st grader (almost 2nd grader) has EE on top of celiac. She has severe food allergies and I was wondering if any of you had ideas for making snacks that fill her up. Right now, I am experimenting with Chebe products. Here is the thing...she is dairy free, allergic to legumes (including soy), allergic to corn, grains, coconut, sesame, tree nuts, carrots, squash, cauliflower, sunflower butter/nuts - I think that about covers it. She was eating all things until her 7th birthday a few weeks ago (when diagnosed). It was her behavior, not her physical pain, that was a symptom. I totally understand if there are no takers on this question, but if you have any ideas about baking with tapioca, potato, amaranth, and/or quinoa flour I would really appreciate it! She can have little amounts of corn and rice and coconut here and there.

AMQmom, here's a good guideline I stole from someone else's post on another thread:

1) You want four main types of flour in your mix--

Bodifiers-- Teff, Sorghum, Rice, bean flours, brown rice, quinoa, millet, amaranth, and cornmeal are a few options. These provide bulk and protein as well as the vitamins (if any, teff is a great source of vitamins).

Modifiers-- Tapioca starch, cornstarch, potato starch, arrowroot powder. These provide lightness and smoothness to the mix.

Moisturizers-- potato starch (this is a duel status item and should be counted in the ratio as a modifier, but if you use too much it will over moisturize the mix), potato flour. These counterbalance the drying tendencies of modifiers.

Extenders-- guar gum, xanthan gum, pectin, (to a degree) fruit acids, and, to a degree, flaxseed. These substitute for gluten and add extra body and stretch to the flour mix, as well as extend the shelf life of your baked goods.

A good ratio to make is 2 cup bodifier: 1 cup modifier: 1/4 cup moisturizer: 3 tsp. extender

You can multiply this ratio for any amount. The secret to getting a mix you like is to mix and match within the categories, but keep the ratios the same.

So you can take any recipe that calls for, say, one cup rice flour, and use 1/2 amaranth and 1/2 quinoa. Tapioca and potato starch are very good to bake with, they're part of a lot of gluten-free recipes already. I would suggest reviewing the recipes section on the celiac.com homepage, and any recipe that catches your eye that has something you can't use in it, post it here adnd we'll help fix it for you.


If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

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not sure if its helpful, but i made the white cake recipe on the back of the box of ener-G tapioca flour, baked like a jelly roll, cut in half and filled with a very simple frosting recipe (something like 3 tb shortening, 2 c sugar, 1 tsp vanilla and 2 tb hot water, i think) - cut in to squares and froze them and i'm using them for lunch deserts. My kids loves them. We're also using the chebe roll mixes, and making them shaped more like hamburger and hot dog rolls. They come out really flat, but they taste good. I also have been making home made cereal/chewy granola bars. Theres not much you can put in them for her, but if you can find a cereal that is just amaranth or quinoa, you could make a bar using honey and dried fruit. there are several recipes i found on line.


Cara - 42, mom to dd 15, ds 12, ds 4

Off gluten and dairy (and tapioca ;-( ) since 11/07

A.L.C.A.T. test showed over 50 sensitive foods

Celiac panel came back negative.

Regular allergy testing reacted to every inhalant and all but 6 foods.

Slowly adding in foods, started w 19 and now have 25

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until you get the flour-snack baking up and going, try lots of veggies (you can blanch them if raw is a problem) and fruit (be careful of store-bought items especially where you eat the peel, I believe they are usually coated with food wax, which typically has corn) - easy to prep once every few days and have at hand for on-demand snacks whenever your daughter gets hungry.

Also, boiled eggs are something I rely on for my afternoon snack, again easy to make a whole batch then eat over a few days as hunger strikes.

My DH made a huge amount of quinoa last month, I can tell you 'refried' quinoa is great - so if you cook quinoa 'normally' (like a side dish, just boiling it up), then mix with a little egg & perhaps some amaranth flour to coat, you could probably saute up some nice quinoa fritters that would be snack size. Could even try deep fried quinoa balls (like rice balls). Or could try baking and then cut into bars. Could even try a sweet version...

Let us know what works for you, I bet you'll find some great snacks! hopefully without too much trial and error ;)


gluten-free (except unintentionally) from 7 Dec 2007

3 gluten-free cousins and counting (1 gold standard, 1 pos blood/no endo, 1 self/dietary diagnosed)

suspect mother was celiac (also, cousin suspects my mother's twin is celiac)

Feb 08 testing 'normal range' for gluten antibodies, IBD and food allergies

Staying off gluten - dietary reaction is compelling for me!

"Hi, I'm the gluten-free diner at your table."

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Don't know if you've tried buckwheat, but since it's not a grain (and not related to wheat), I figure I should mention it. I find teff to be really good in baking, and millet too, which is said to be one of the least allergenic grains on the planet.

I think there should be other flours which your child can have without problems. Maybe you'll find some you can use here: http://www.barryfarm.com/flours.htm


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

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I am jumping up and down in joy! Thank you all! I can't wait to get out and experiment! I appreciate the starter tips. I can not believe all of the help that I have received from this site - thank you!!!!! -Julie (AMQ and AGQ Mom)

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