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katebuggie28

Need Help/advice

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I am brave enough to finally take on baking gluten-free for the first time. I have searched a little on the internet for recipes that are gluten-free, but I prefer to use this board as everyone has been so helpful in the past. I have not read through the posts under this section yet (unless they were new posts) so I am sorry if the questions I ask have already been asked and answered. I just dont have it in me to read thousands of posts today. :) Okay there are a few things I need to ask. 1. Is there anyone here that was tolerent of tomato sauce, but is now intolerent? That would be me. Is it the high acidity? Is it because it is manufactured? If I made my own would it be more tolerable? ( I can eat tomatoes with no problem) Is there a way to make store bought more tolerable? I am missing pizza something awful! :)

I also went and bought whatever flours that were wheat/gluten-free from Chamberlains, and I have tried to find bread recipes that will work with what I found. I am going to go online and order whole bean flour and brown rice flour today. Here is what I have: buckwheat flour, arrowroot, millet flour, garbanzo bean flour, flax seed, tapioca flour, rice flour, xanthan gum, soy flour. Any ideas about what I can make with those until I can get the others? Any tips on what staples I should have? Price isn't an object. I would spend the same eating out anyway, so I feel I am saving money. Is cornstarch gluten-free/WF? What about yeast? Thanks for any help. Sorry post was so long. Off to do more research. :D

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I can't answer the flour question....I've replaced bread with gluten-free pasta...and throw lunch meats or veggies on it. I haven't gotten that venturous yet :-)

But the tomato sauce.....I think it might have to do with the acidity. I make my own (usualy throw diced tomatoes, garlic, peppers and a bunch of other spices in a blender, I also throw in some sugar and I think it helps off set the acidity of the tomatoes. I also have used the no salt added tomato sauces and added my own spices and it doesn't bother me. A lot of the jar sauces that are high in sodium do bother me.

hope that helps :-)


Jami

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http://www.glutenfreedrinks.com/AlcoholBeverages2.htm

this site has a lot of recepies, google gluten-free baking. =)


Gluten Free going on 5 years and counting!

gluten-free is a life change and not a diet.

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Yeast and cornstarch are gluten-free. You don't need to buy special brands. To be sure, as always check the label. I've been in a few stores, not many, that the flour aisle was such a mess with flour everywhere that I wouldn't buy anything there for fear of CC, but most are fine.


Me: GLUTEN-FREE 7/06, multiple food allergies, T2 DIABETES DX 8/08, LADA-Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults, Who knew food allergies could trigger an autoimmune attack on the pancreas?! 1/11 Re-DX T1 DM, pos. DQ2 Celiac gene test 9/11

Son: ADHD '06,

neg. CELIAC PANEL 5/07

ALLERGY: "positive" blood and skin tests to wheat, which triggers his eczema '08

ENTEROLAB testing: elevated Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA Dec. '08

Gluten-free-Feb. '09

other food allergies

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I just tried "Nomato". You can find it in the gluten-free Mall. On the left. I think it is under "gluten-free condiments" but not certain. It is pretty good. A very bright red compared to regular tomato sauce, but quite tasty. I poured t over meatballs last night. Yummy!!

I find I tend to bake with rice, sorghum, amaranth, tapioca and arrowroot the most. I also have teff which I make delicious cookies with. Baking soda. Baking powder.

I dont use xanthum gum. I use ground chia seeds. Great binder. High fiber and essential fatty acids. The xanthum gum adds zero nutrition. I use the same amount that is called for in xanthum gum.

Ive had this cookbook for about 2 weeks and love it!! Simple recipes. Simple ingredients. And the back of the book is a gold mine for substitutions. So if you want to bake one day and discover you are out of eggs, she has a sub. Or sugar. Or anything really. Tells you what flours do what and how to combine them. I highly recommend, "Cooking Free".

https://www.celiac.com/catalog/product_info...products_id=462


GLUTEN FREE 4/4/08. LEGUME/SOY FREE 5/15/08. YEAST FREE. CORN FREE. GRAIN FREE. DAIRY FREE. I am eating all meats, eggs, veggies, fruits, squash, nuts and seeds. I just keep getting better every day. :)

Do not let any of the advice given here substitute for good medical care. Let this forum be a catalyst for research. Find support for any post in here before you believe it to be true. Arm yourself with knowledge. Let your doctor be your assistant. Listen to their advice, but follow your own instincts as well. Miracles are within your reach. You can heal!

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I have tried 4 homemade pizza crust recipes and we like the best the one from Bette Hagman's book: The Gluten Free Gourmet Cooks Fast and Healthy. pg.33 flours are white rice, potato starch, tapioca flour. You can sub cornstarch for the potato and part brown rice for some of the white rice flour. Recipe on pg.241: I follow exactly but I add 1 tsp. basil, 1/2 tsp. garlic powder and I use onion salt for the plain. I read somewhere to do this: Allow the crust to rise 10 min then prebake it for 15 to 20 mins, then top it and bake 10-15 mins more until the cheese melts. I do that and it turns out great. Very easy. My family likes chicken alfredo. All you need is the crust, mozzarella, cooked/ chopped chicken(1 1/2 to 1 3/4 cups), and a jar of Bertolli Alfredo sauce,its gluten-free, (about 3/4 of a jar)(they don't like Classico). Spread some sauce onto the crust then some of the cheese. In a bowl add some sauce to the chicken and stir it up, its messy to add to the crust but you can spoon it on. Add anything else you like. Oh ya... Spread the crust onto the pan with a knife like you are frosting a cake is the easiest way I found. Make a ridge. The crust shrinks just a bit. If you find you can eat BBQ sauce just sub the BBQ for the Alfredo. Kraft is gluten-free unless it states wheat on the jar. Recipe says 15inch pan, mine is 12inches,works perfect. You will be able to eat pizze again...hooray!!! Some people don't like bean flour, try it in small amounts and never taste raw dough they say its gross. I didn't like the pizza crusts I tried that had bean flour in it.


Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden and I will give you rest. Matthew 11:28

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I just posted 2 recipes we use all the time. Look under the topics: Quick Oats in recipes and Taco shells


Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden and I will give you rest. Matthew 11:28

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I dont use xanthum gum. I use ground chia seeds. Great binder. High fiber and essential fatty acids. The xanthum gum adds zero nutrition. I use the same amount that is called for in xanthum gum.

I've never heard of chia seeds before, they sound interesting. Where do you get them and are they pre-ground or do you grind them yourself? Do they work the same way as xanthan gum in gluten-free baking?

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You can find chia seeds at most health food stores or buy them online. You can get whole seeds or pre-ground. They do not go rancid fast which is very nice.

I have never used xanthum gum, so do not know the difference. I just started baking and realized I didnt have any. So I looked through my frig/pantry to see what would work as a "binder". Chia gives off a mucilage and I just reasoned it would work. And it has. I just used the same amount called for as xanthum. It isnt "snow white" so will give very minute flecks to the recipe. Something I dont care about. But I guess if you were making a white wedding cake, maybe you wouldnt want it.


GLUTEN FREE 4/4/08. LEGUME/SOY FREE 5/15/08. YEAST FREE. CORN FREE. GRAIN FREE. DAIRY FREE. I am eating all meats, eggs, veggies, fruits, squash, nuts and seeds. I just keep getting better every day. :)

Do not let any of the advice given here substitute for good medical care. Let this forum be a catalyst for research. Find support for any post in here before you believe it to be true. Arm yourself with knowledge. Let your doctor be your assistant. Listen to their advice, but follow your own instincts as well. Miracles are within your reach. You can heal!

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