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RainyZ

gluten-free Flours

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I've noticed when I eat products with sorghum I have an asthma attack. I begin to wheeze, cough and am unable to catch my breath. Anyone else have this issue? It seems like my pool of available foods to eat is shrinking daily....

:(

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I've noticed when I eat products with sorghum I have an asthma attack. I begin to wheeze, cough and am unable to catch my breath. Anyone else have this issue? It seems like my pool of available foods to eat is shrinking daily....

:(

I live in a rural farm community where sorghun and wheat are grown. Because of your post, it made me wonder if wheat and sorghum can be cultivated and processed in the much the same manner that oats are grown and processed and subject to cross contamination.

There has been much talk about oats not being safe due to this facts and most are considered not gluten free. Could sorghum be added to this discussion? Sorghum would not contain the offending protein as in wheat, but cross contamination with wheat would be likely.

Any other thoughts?


Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

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I've never had a reaction to sorghum but most of the flour or products I buy are from Japan and dedicated facilities.

Sorghum soy sauce is great by the way. I suspect that the processing equipment as you suggested may cause CC.

Millet is another one. If I use the ones form Japan I don't have trouble but some millet item I got in the US caused a reaction.

I do have to wonder if the gluten protein is in other non-edible grasses. We have so many strange types of tropical grass here that I react too (DH) if I'm out in a field weeding.

take care

Ken

I live in a rural farm community where sorghun and wheat are grown. Because of your post, it made me wonder if wheat and sorghum can be cultivated and processed in the much the same manner that oats are grown and processed and subject to cross contamination.

There has been much talk about oats not being safe due to this facts and most are considered not gluten free. Could sorghum be added to this discussion? Sorghum would not contain the offending protein as in wheat, but cross contamination with wheat would be likely.

Any other thoughts?


"Ryo tatereba mi ga tatanu"

If we try to serve both sides, we cannot stand our own ground.

Japanese proverb

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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I use Bob's sorghum and have not reacted and supposedly he checks his flours and marks them gluten free.

What brand of sorghum are you using?


GLUTEN FREE 4/4/08. LEGUME/SOY FREE 5/15/08. YEAST FREE. CORN FREE. GRAIN FREE. DAIRY FREE. I am eating all meats, eggs, veggies, fruits, squash, nuts and seeds. I just keep getting better every day. :)

Do not let any of the advice given here substitute for good medical care. Let this forum be a catalyst for research. Find support for any post in here before you believe it to be true. Arm yourself with knowledge. Let your doctor be your assistant. Listen to their advice, but follow your own instincts as well. Miracles are within your reach. You can heal!

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I haven't noticed any gluten reaction to any gluten-free flours, though I agree it's possible to have CC issues due to where they are grown.

There is some debate whether sorghum and millet are related, but from what I've read, millet is considered one of the least allergenic grains on the planet. I suppose if I wanted to be sure whether it was CC or not, I'd try some of the grain. Rinse it, and cook it up by itself to eat as a hot cereal. That way there's nothing else to possibly react to.


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

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I made gluten-free bread from Bob's Red Mill mix and I use Pamela's Baking Mix often. I reacted to the bread - asthma attack, but I've never reacted to Pamela's that way. I checked the ingredient list and the only difference that I could react to would be the sorghum. I've eaten garbanzo and fava beans so don't think it is those flours. I've read about cc from Bob's products, but I don't wheeze when I am glutened so it must be something else in it....

I do wheeze with psyllium and alfalfa which I think are also low on the allergen scale. Lucky me, huh? LOL. I think I am just going to eat a very simple diet of just a few things (rice, veggies, fruits, etc) and then rotate things in to see what I react to rather than just taking things out one by one.

It seems like maybe the issues/symptoms the gluten caused in my body masked the issues I was having with other foods. Is that common?

The wheezing/asthma attacks really concern me. I actually ate the bread twice just to see if I was imagining things. I haven't had an asthma attack in 9 years and none of my allergies were food related. I don't even medicate for it anymore, so I was caught off guard. There is no mistaking it though.

Thanks for all of your posts.

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I actually have a lot of food allergies -- you can be allergic to almost anything. Also, you can cross-react to a food you arent allergic too if something related is currently blooming near you. I'm eating a very limited diet, which is very frustrating, but when i stick to it (not easy) i do feel much better


Cara - 42, mom to dd 15, ds 12, ds 4

Off gluten and dairy (and tapioca ;-( ) since 11/07

A.L.C.A.T. test showed over 50 sensitive foods

Celiac panel came back negative.

Regular allergy testing reacted to every inhalant and all but 6 foods.

Slowly adding in foods, started w 19 and now have 25

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