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Rhesa

Whole Wheat Flour Replaces

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I have tried out a few recipes with various gluten-free flour mixes but before I found out I was gluten intolerant, I almost never used white flour for anything. All of the replacement recipes are pretty low in fibre and I would like to know if anyone has had success with using any particular ingredients to create a higher fibre gluten-free flour mix.

Thanks!!

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HI, I'm new this forum, and would like to know about this as well. My son has celiacs and though he really prefers white bread (gluten free now, of course) I would like him to try some heartier breads. Because I'm new to this I'm not sure I got it right, but I think the bean flours are higher in protein, but I'm not sure about fiber.

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I like using sorghum flour and flax seed meal for a healthier, heartier bread. Some people use bean flours as a healthier alternative (I don't care for the flavor of them, myself.) Also, don't forget about brown rice flour, which is higher in fiber than white rice flour.

All the successful gluten-free flour blends I've found have added starch-- usually potato or corn starch, plus tapioca starch. These are added to a main flour such as rice, sorghum, bean, etc. The starches add fluffiness and chewiness (among other qualities) to your bread.

Flax meal is a wonderful thing to add to baked goods, to increase fiber and omega 3 fatty acids. Keep your flax meal in the fridge once opened. I often add it to muffins, pizza crust, and pancakes.

This is my everyday sandwich bread recipe, adapted from Lorka/Laurie's recipe. For the gluten-free flour blend, I usually use equal parts rice flour, corn starch, and tapioca starch. I use this same recipe for hamburger buns, using a muffin-top pan to form the bun shapes.

1 1/4 c. gluten-free flour blend

3/4 c. corn starch

1/4 c. sorghum flour

1/4 c. flax seed meal

2 1/2 tsp. xanthan gum

2 tsp. yeast

1 tsp. salt

2 Tbsp sugar

2 eggs

2 egg whites

1 c. warm water

2 Tbsp. vegetable/canola oil

2 tsp vinegar

Sift together dry ingredients. Whisk together wet ingredients. Add wet to dry and mix 4-5 minutes. Pour into greased 9x5 pan and let rise to top of pan (60 minutes or more.) Preheat oven to 350. Bake at 350 for about 40 minutes. Cool completely before slicing.


-Sarah

--Son, Lucas, age 7. Gluten-free since May 2007

--Son, Ezra, age 5. Gluten-free 10/13/07. Bipolar tendencies, massively improved on gluten-free diet! He's also allergic to a jillion antibiotics.

--My mother has Celiac Disease, dx'ed by Positive Blood Tests and Biopsy. Diagnosed Sarcoidosis 6/08.

--Myself, Gluten-free since 8/07

Time heals all hurt of heart... but time must be won.

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You can add a small amount of almond meal or hazelnut meal (Bob's sells it). Like up to 1/3 of the flour in a recipe. More fiber. I also add some ground Chia seeds to my baking for more fiber and nutrition.


GLUTEN FREE 4/4/08. LEGUME/SOY FREE 5/15/08. YEAST FREE. CORN FREE. GRAIN FREE. DAIRY FREE. I am eating all meats, eggs, veggies, fruits, squash, nuts and seeds. I just keep getting better every day. :)

Do not let any of the advice given here substitute for good medical care. Let this forum be a catalyst for research. Find support for any post in here before you believe it to be true. Arm yourself with knowledge. Let your doctor be your assistant. Listen to their advice, but follow your own instincts as well. Miracles are within your reach. You can heal!

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Here is a formula for mixing your own.

You want four main types of flour in your mix--

Bodifiers-- Teff, Sorghum, Rice, bean flours, brown rice, quinoa, millet, amaranth, and cornmeal are a few options. These provide bulk and protein as well as the vitamins (if any, teff is a great source of vitamins).

Modifiers-- Tapioca starch, cornstarch, potato starch, arrowroot powder. These provide lightness and smoothness to the mix.

Moisturizers-- potato starch (this is a duel status item and should be counted in the ratio as a modifier, but if you use too much it will over moisturize the mix), potato flour. These counterbalance the drying tendencies of modifiers.

Extenders-- guar gum, xanthan gum, pectin, (to a degree) fruit acids, and, to a degree, flaxseed. These substitute for gluten and add extra body and stretch to the flour mix, as well as extend the shelf life of your baked goods.

A good ratio to make is 2 cup bodifier: 1 cup modifier: 1/4 cup moisturizer: 3 tsp. extender

You can multiply this ratio for any amount. The secret to getting a mix you like is to mix and match within the categories, but keep the ratios the same.

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I have tried out a few recipes with various gluten-free flour mixes but before I found out I was gluten intolerant, I almost never used white flour for anything. All of the replacement recipes are pretty low in fibre and I would like to know if anyone has had success with using any particular ingredients to create a higher fibre gluten-free flour mix.

Thanks!!

To add to what's been posted so far you can experiment with coconut flour. It has 6 grams of fiber in only 2 Tablespoons(12 grams fiber in 1/4 cup!). Don't use much at a time. I replaced 1/4 cup in choc chip cookies that called for 2 1/4 cups gluten-free flour mix. I didn't notice any change. I only add 1 or 2 T. in a recipe. You could smell it in the dough but not taste it in the cookies. I've tried it in pastry that called for 2 1/4 cups gluten-free flour mix (I used 2T. and 2 T. sorghum, dough was stickier but still worked great-used for mini pot pies, no rolling out). I also used it in muffins, biscuits, and cookies. I will use it in brownies, cakes, waffles and breads next. Check into using some gluten-free oats (1/2 cup=4 grams fiber) and try to turn it into flour in whatever electric machine you have. Start with small amounts. Would work good for cookies or muffins for a first try, you may need more liquid. I add chopped nuts wherever I can. I add beans in casseroles and you could add chopped nuts, flax, grated carrot, etc. in most casseroles to add extra fiber. Happy baking!


Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden and I will give you rest. Matthew 11:28

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Try the recipe for banana bread and millet oat bread from this site. I use sorghum instead of the millet flour.

http://glutenfreemommy.com/


Me: GLUTEN-FREE 7/06, multiple food allergies, T2 DIABETES DX 8/08, LADA-Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults, Who knew food allergies could trigger an autoimmune attack on the pancreas?! 1/11 Re-DX T1 DM, pos. DQ2 Celiac gene test 9/11

Son: ADHD '06,

neg. CELIAC PANEL 5/07

ALLERGY: "positive" blood and skin tests to wheat, which triggers his eczema '08

ENTEROLAB testing: elevated Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA Dec. '08

Gluten-free-Feb. '09

other food allergies

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