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kprince

What Do These Numbers Mean?

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I just got my test result numbers faxed to me. I know that I have celiacs, but do these numbers tell you anything else. Does it show the degree of damage. Any info would be fantastic.

Anti-Gliadin IgG ELISA (AGA IgG) 52.7 U/ml reference range <10.0U/ml

Anti-Gliadin IgG ELISA (AGA IgA) 13.5 U/ml reference range <5.0U/ml

Anti-Human Tissue Transglutaminase IgA ELISA (TTG IgA) >100.0 U/ml reference range <4.0 U/ml

Anti-Endomysial IgA (EMA IgA) positive reference range negative

Total Serum IgA by Nephelometry (TOTAL IgA) 200 mg/dl Reference range > 13 years to adult 44-441 mg/dl

Thanks my fellow experts on your unbelievable knowledge!

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kprince--

It appears that your AGA IgG, AGA IgA, and TTG IgA numbers are all very high, indicating that you are having a strong immune response to gluten. There are some celiacs who talk of having minimal or unnoticeable reactions to eating gluten; I suspect you are not one of them.

There is a diagnostic test, a D-Xylose Absorption Rate test, that can assess the capacity of your intestine to absorb a specific type of sugar. My understanding is that you fast, go to the lab, drink a sugar-water solution, and then have your blood drawn at intervals over several hours. This test should be able to show that your intestine isn't functioning fully, and give you a specific measure of how it compares to a healthy intestine.

I haven't had a D-Xylose Absorption test myself; I'm no expert here. Does anybody else have experience using Xylose to measure intestinal damage? I guess the theory would be to repeat the test after 6 months of gluten-free to see if there is improvement.

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Strangely, some people with lower numbers have more damage than ones with extremely high numbers. I am not sure it really matters. Obviously you have celiac disease, start the gluten-free diet and get well!

With those numbers you may want to check every six months to see if they are going down, though.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

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