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anerissara

Is Dextrin "glutenized"? What About Blue Cheese?

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Is dextrin a no-no, or just Maltodextrin? The word "Malto" would make me avoid somthing, but what about plain dextrin?

Also, so far the most tragic part of the gluten-free diet for me is blue cheese. I guess they grow the mold with wheat bread? So does anyone know if blue cheese *really* has enough g to cause a problem, and are there some kinds of blue cheese that are safe?

Thanks!

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If you have a product that the company says is glutenfree and it has bleu cheese in it then it is fine. A lot of bleu cheese is grown on a bread mold and not glutenfree.

It really is up to you if you want to eat it or not. If the cheese is made with a bread core and I personally do not eat it because it does contain gluten. I don't want the littlest bit of gluten in me.

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Dextrin can be made of corn, thus it doesn't have to contain gluten. Maltodextrin does not contain gluten when it's in food in the United States, despite the "malt" in the name (sorta like "buckwheat" is fine, despite having "wheat" in the name).

I would not eat bleu cheese.

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Dextrin can be ok ...it is usually made from corn but can be made from wheat so you must check unless the food says gluten-free.

Maltodextrin as stated by celiac3270 is ok when it is food in the U.S

I would also stay away from blue cheese unless you contact a company and they say it is safe.

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Most blue cheese these days actually is NOT made with bread as a starter, and is safe, but to be sure about the brand you're buying, always call the company. There's a good chance it's gluten-free, but you have to verify.

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Are companies usually pretty good at telling you if something has g in it? I'm very new to this so I've never tried. The only experience I've had so far with asking about gluten in food was calling a Mexican restraunt...I asked if they had a gluten-free menu and was told (in very snotty tones) that "Of course not, we are an AUTHENTIC Mexican resturaunt" LOL. I'd imagine that larger food companies would know what I was talking about better...do you just get the # off the package and call? I guess I should take a pen and paper with me next time I'm shopping and collect numbers of the foods I have questions about.

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Going out to eat and buying food from a store are very different things. If you call a company or write them they will tell you if their products contain gluten or not. If they were to lie about being glutenfre then they would run the risk of being sued.

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Alot of restaurants are not gluten-free. Many of them may have items that are gluten-free but there is a high risk for contamination. If you are very sensitive to gluten do not risk eating out in places like that.

You can get on websites and email the company and ask them. Many companies will give you a gluten-free list , tell you they do not hide it under anything (so unless it says wheat, rye, barley , or oats those are safe), or they will tell you they don't have anything gluten free

:D good luck

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Avoiding all blue cheese simply is not necessary. Call the company. Boar's Head is gluten-free. The blue cheese used in Outbacks' blue cheese dressing is gluten-free. Kraft blue cheese dressing is gluten-free. In fact, a large percentage of American blue cheeses are started on an artificial medium, not bread.

Before I say this let me make it clear that I am not advising anybody to eat blue cheese without checking it out. Call the company and if they start it on bread, avoid it if you want. But I honestly believe blue cheese is one of the least of our worries. From all I've read, even IF gluten carries over into culture started on bread (which is debatable), and even IF every molecule of that culture were gluten, you still be talking about less than 1 part per million.

And to the original poster, maltodextrin in food at least is gluten-free.

richard

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