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Softballer7

Teen Wanting Celiac Online Friends!

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Hi, I'll be 13 in Feb. and was diagnosed this past spring after having mono for months. I don't know any celiacs and would love to chat with someone who does.

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hey im 15 and was diagnosed in December, pm me if you want, or join celiac teens (www.celiacteens.com/messageboard)

hi nikki im michelle im 15 and also have celiac disease and i've been waiting to chat with another teen like me so thanks for the website url!

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hi I am a teen wanting online celiac friends too! im 15 and i was diagnoised in the summer of 2005 ever since been longing to have another teen to talk about my celiac problems too. any1 here have aim? im deadlydreamer26 on there. feel free to message me.

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Hey! I'm 16. I live in Missouri and don't know anyone else around here with celiac disease. I have msn so if you want to email me my address is: kaseyarleen325@msn.com - you can email me anytime!

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Hello, i'm Hannah

I'm 15 and I live in California, I was diagnosed (somewhere around mid FEB.)

I just need someone to vent to.

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Hey guys whats going on?? I was diagnosed w/ celiac disease in early june and have only met one person that has this disease........ anyways hit me up on my face book i would love to get to know you. my name is Alex Stoyanoff. Hope to talk to you soon!!!

Alex.

I looked you up on facebook..haha. are you the pic with like a bonfire ish type of thing??. If so I'll friend you when you reply.

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Hello, i'm Hannah

I'm 15 and I live in California, I was diagnosed (somewhere around mid FEB.)

I just need someone to vent to.

Hey Hannah,

My name is Allison

Just know anytime you want to talk or vent about anything let me know!! Were about the same age so we should be able to relate!

Keep in touch :)

Allison

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Hi, I'll be 13 in Feb. and was diagnosed this past spring after having mono for months. I don't know any celiacs and would love to chat with someone who does.

Hey,

Anytime if you wanna chat talk to me on aim...if you have one... allisonnn04 or just on here!

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I'll talk!

I don't know anybody on here.

I'm fifteen, from California. I found out I wasn't able to have gluten the day after my birthday last year. So December 2nd.

Hey,

I'll talk too!! haha

So how has it been for you?? What are your favorite dishes and snacks??

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Hey guys! I'm 18 years old, and I'm starting university in September. My doctor has unofficially diagnosed me with Celiac Disease, and I am waiting for my results to come back to make it definite. I've been living gluten-free for about 6 months, except for the period when I had to eat it to make my blood test accurate. (The first blood test I had came back a false negative, and my doctor said it was because I was gluten-free for months at the time.)

I have been very sick my entire life, but have just recently found out that it was due to gluten consumption. I don't know anyone who has Celiac, gluten intolerance, or anything close to this. None of my friends or family even have food allergies. That makes it very difficult for people to understand. It would be great if I had someone to talk to about it, and I'd be glad to talk to others who need it :).

Feel free to email me! bethany_colbourne_12@hotmail.com.

:).

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anyone here wanna talk about like celiac and stuff!!!

If your still on sure I would love to ;)

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Hi, another celiac here new to the forums :P

I was diagnosed at 14 months of age, and now I'm 16 and well.

@Alli. My parents also informed my old school I was celiac, mainly because I entered when I was 10 years, and still not completely aware of what I was allergic of. But after that one time, my parents had no more contact with the school regarding being celiac.

When I used to go to camps or such, my mum would always enter and explain things. It could be a bit irritating at times, but I just accepted it.

The main issue here is trust. If you can show your parents that you can uphold your diet they will start trusting you. For these last two years, any camp / dinner I went to, I ordered for myself because now they know that I know my condition better than they do (since I'm the only celiac in my family. Well my father is slightly intolerant but he still takes gluten).

Also, as for completely emotional. Yes, I do. It's called being a teenager. :P Everyone passes through such days at our age. We just have something to blame it on (even though it might not be directly influential.)

@CranberryThief. Give them a few months to understand that you can handle it on yourself. They'll start backing off slowly themselves. :)

Also, Aim / MSN / Y!IM should be in my profile. Anyone feel free to hit me up. I tend to suffer from boredom a bit :D

Well, we sound alike(exepted for the fact that you were diagnosed earlier than I was) I would love to talk some time, especially since you are a pro.

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hey hannah! im a celiac hannah too! you're the first one ive met so far :)

im nineteen and a sophomore in college. ive been gluten free a little over three years and have learned to make almost anything i want to be gluten free. most recen success: cinnamon rolls. next endeavors: poptarts

(what can i say?? i miss them lol) and crackers

anyways im on fb and myspace and yahoo... lemme know if you want info!

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hey, i'm emma, this is my first post, WOOT! lol. i'm 18 (just now, it's a little past midnight, august 14th and it's my b-day!) so woot woot! haha, i was looking for a good, new chocolate cake.... and then i started reading the teen posts lol so hi! i have been mostly wheat free since i was 8, of course i didnt really understand that when i ate stuff like mac and cheese at my friends houses that it hurt me lol not my mom since i broke the rules lol. but i have been gluten free and dairy free for almost five years now.. and i feel so much better :D

when i first stopped eating wheat, i had been really sick.. like missing an average of 75 days a year out of 180 at school.... the school threatened to hold me back! luckily i was a good little student (when i was there) and my mom was not about to be pushed around lol. but after we went to go see dr. lamson at a clinic that dr. jonathon wright made (he's a pretty major naturopath). i was taken off wheat, then about 3 months later, i slept for almost a month straight.. i mean i got up and went to the bathroom, i would eat (i actually had an appetite! yay! which i didnt before), then go back to bed.... after that month i felt soooo much better.. it was crazy.

before being gluten-free i had emotions like the craziest rollercoaster thinkable, i'm still really emotional but i can handle it better now.. sorta.. haha. all of my friends and family know that i am really sensitive and i cry easily and simple things can just put me in a terrible mood.

i was reading some posts and saw a few comments about being overly emotional... so i just kinda want to talk to some people that are like me because most people i know just don't get how i feel.... maybe its a celiac thing?? lol

but if you aren't emotional i'd still like to talk to you!

Thanks

Emma

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hey hannah! im a celiac hannah too! you're the first one ive met so far :)

im nineteen and a sophomore in college. ive been gluten free a little over three years and have learned to make almost anything i want to be gluten free. most recen success: cinnamon rolls. next endeavors: poptarts

(what can i say?? i miss them lol) and crackers

anyways im on fb and myspace and yahoo... lemme know if you want info!

Hey Hannah!

Would you mind giving me the recipe you used for cinnamon rollls? I've tried making them a couple times and it just didnt work..haha

and if you get the poptarts..I would LOVE to have the recipe!!

Thanks!

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http://iamglutenfree.blogspot.com/2007/03/...our-dreams.html

this is a link to the recipe i got out of my cookbook from roben ryberg "Gluten Free Kitchen." she really knows her stuff.

i like to change the flour mix though.. last time i did cornstarch equal to the amount called for but subbed half the potato starch for buckwheat flour because i hadnt ever used them. these turn out really well. i roll them out on sugared parchment paper so that you can pick up one side of it to roll them up. the dough is very soft and wet and its really difficult to pick it up to roll haha

good luck i think you'll be happy with them. and im hoping to undertake poptarts really soon :D wish me luck

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Hi! I'm 15, almost 16, and I was diagnosed with celiac a few months ago. So far I've been okay, but it gets hard watching other people eat my favorite foods. We've tried lots of recipes, and my mom's found a really great gluten-free baking cookbook. The bread's not quite as I'd like it, but cookies, cupcakes, and muffins are basically indistinguishable! If I have a party for my sixteenth birthday, I'm going to make all the food myself.

Happy to talk, and oh my goodness, Pop Tarts and cinnamon rolls? You'll have to share. The next things I try will be fresh pasta and possibly moo shu. I miss my Chinese food.

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Hi! I'm 15, almost 16, and I was diagnosed with celiac a few months ago. So far I've been okay, but it gets hard watching other people eat my favorite foods. We've tried lots of recipes, and my mom's found a really great gluten-free baking cookbook. The bread's not quite as I'd like it, but cookies, cupcakes, and muffins are basically indistinguishable! If I have a party for my sixteenth birthday, I'm going to make all the food myself.

Happy to talk, and oh my goodness, Pop Tarts and cinnamon rolls? You'll have to share. The next things I try will be fresh pasta and possibly moo shu. I miss my Chinese food.

im not sure what kind of pasta you were going to try making... but this is the only noodle i have made from scratch yet. but wow they are good! its a homemade egg noodle: (from Carol Fenster's Wheat free recipes and menus-VERY good book)

2 large eggs

1/4 cup water

1 T canola oil for hand method (reduce to 1 tsp for machine method)

1/2 C brown rice (or sorghum) flour

1/2 C tapioca

1/2 C cornstarch

1/4 C potato starch

4 tsp xanthan

1 tsp unflavored gelatin

directions: combine oil, eggs and water in a food processor and process until the eggs are light yellow in color. add the remaining ingredients and process until thoroughly blended and mixture forms a ball. remove the cover of the food processor and break the dough into egg sized pieces, cover and process until ball is once again formed.

transfer the dough to a pastry board or toher smooth surface. roll dough between two sheets of waxed paper or plastic wrap dusted with rice flour. roll as thinly as possible and cut into desired shapes with a sharp knife or pastry cutter. cook in boiling water until firm but tender to the bite; about five minutes.

other than that her book has some other pasta recipes.. and a killer cheesecake recipe. mmm :)

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Wow, thanks! I'll make sure to try that as soon as my mom gets back next week. I've missed egg noodles! Speaking of pasta, have any of you guys tried the Bionaturae gluten-free varieties? I used to be quite the pasta junkie, and I can't tell the difference between this and regular pasta. Seriously. Sometimes I check the packaging.

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*looks around*

Well, I think my first post would fit snugly in this thread. :lol:

I was self diagnosed (sort of, some friends really helped pull me to it) and age 16, around a month and some days ago. Still in that long, uncertain, foggy recovery phase. Doing my part in battle though, I know I'll pull through this! :)

Other than that there's no telling who I'll meet on the forums and how long I'll be around. I look forward to that.

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hey, i'm emma, this is my first post, WOOT! lol. i'm 18 (just now, it's a little past midnight, august 14th and it's my b-day!) so woot woot! haha, i was looking for a good, new chocolate cake.... and then i started reading the teen posts lol so hi! i have been mostly wheat free since i was 8, of course i didnt really understand that when i ate stuff like mac and cheese at my friends houses that it hurt me lol not my mom since i broke the rules lol. but i have been gluten free and dairy free for almost five years now.. and i feel so much better :D

when i first stopped eating wheat, i had been really sick.. like missing an average of 75 days a year out of 180 at school.... the school threatened to hold me back! luckily i was a good little student (when i was there) and my mom was not about to be pushed around lol. but after we went to go see dr. lamson at a clinic that dr. jonathon wright made (he's a pretty major naturopath). i was taken off wheat, then about 3 months later, i slept for almost a month straight.. i mean i got up and went to the bathroom, i would eat (i actually had an appetite! yay! which i didnt before), then go back to bed.... after that month i felt soooo much better.. it was crazy.

before being gluten-free i had emotions like the craziest rollercoaster thinkable, i'm still really emotional but i can handle it better now.. sorta.. haha. all of my friends and family know that i am really sensitive and i cry easily and simple things can just put me in a terrible mood.

i was reading some posts and saw a few comments about being overly emotional... so i just kinda want to talk to some people that are like me because most people i know just don't get how i feel.... maybe its a celiac thing?? lol

but if you aren't emotional i'd still like to talk to you!

Thanks

Emma

Trust me i know what you mean. Sometimes theres just those times when you know that something upsets you a lot, but you have no idea why. It's the worst when I get into fights with my boyfriend because there are those times where he doesn't realize I'm not trying to be emotional and sometimes there's no reason behind it. There are times when I'll fight with him and 5 minutes afterwards its hard for me to even remember what started the fight or even what I said. It's extremely difficult :( but the fact that he's still stood by me through diagnosis, treatment, surgery, and all of my everyday needs really shows character. I'm surprised because there are times when I don't even want to deal with myself. I've found that somedays you need a day to yourself to work it out and calm down, and somedays you just need to keep going with your regular activities. Gluten contact makes me go CRAZY for two days straight. I've been diagnosed with both anxiety and depression and it's lessened serverly since I've been on this diet. However my tolerance has gone way down since then and now when I come in contact with gluten its stress overload city and I snap at anyone who falls in my path. Anyways enough ranting.. haha

My email is elenahuerta10@yahoo.com if you or anyone else wants to chat :lol:

The only support group in my area meets on saturdays and I always work from 9-5. I'd be happy to chat with anyone who wants to B)

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http://iamglutenfree.blogspot.com/2007/03/...our-dreams.html

this is a link to the recipe i got out of my cookbook from roben ryberg "Gluten Free Kitchen." she really knows her stuff.

i like to change the flour mix though.. last time i did cornstarch equal to the amount called for but subbed half the potato starch for buckwheat flour because i hadnt ever used them. these turn out really well. i roll them out on sugared parchment paper so that you can pick up one side of it to roll them up. the dough is very soft and wet and its really difficult to pick it up to roll haha

good luck i think you'll be happy with them. and im hoping to undertake poptarts really soon :D wish me luck

Thanks for the link!! I made them today and they are so so so delicious!!! I've tried making them before and failed so thanks :)

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