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sixdogssixcats

Need Simple List Of Common "no-no" Items For Preschool Teacher

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I see lots of comprehensive of foods and ingredients which are hugely helpful as we learn what is, and is not, safe for our 3 1/2yo daughter. However, she starts school in a couple of weeks, and I'd like to be able to hand her teacher a list of things to avoid that would common in a lower school classroom. Like play-doh, glue, etc with brand names. I don't want to overwhelm the teacher and I think compliance will be much higher with a shorter and more specific list. I'm even envisioning a poster with pictures on it for the kids ... something like a can of play-doh with a big red X over it.

Surely, this wheel has already been invented. Can someone help me find it? Thanks so much.


Lesley

Mom of Catherine - 01/18/05 (Celiac, Reflux, Psoriasis)

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Well, Elmer's school glue is gluten-free, but AFAIK, stuff like paper mache would contain gluten. Finger paints also contain gluten, though I suppose there may be a gluten-free brand out there somewhere. Obviously, macaroni craft projects wouldn't be safe either unless the pasta is gluten-free. I think I saw some cheap corn pasta being sold at a few places, so that might be one way to have your child not feel left out.

I just tried searching the forum for finger paint, and a lot of threads came up. So try that and you may find more info you can use.

HTH


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

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Watch out for projects that use cereal. I teach first grade and I know that early childhood teachers do many projects with Fruit Loops, Cheerios, etc. You can always give the teacher a box of gluten free cereal for your daughter to use. Here is a list of gluten free art materials:

Modeling Clay: Crayola, Klean Klay, Model Magic

Glue: Elmer's and Ross liquid or glue sticks

Paint: Sargent, Dick Blick tempera, Ross tempera, Lakeshore tempera and washable finger paint, Prismatone tempera

Crayola: All Crayola products are gluten free EXCEPT the dough

I am giving this list to my son's teachers. I hope this helps!


Amy

1989: I am diagnosed with IBS.

3/08: 8-year-old son diagnosed with Celiac (blood test and biopsy) and allergies to corn, egg whites, soy, peanuts, walnuts, wheat, and clam.

6/08: My Celiac test is negative.

7/08: I go completely gluten free despite negative test and NO MORE IBS SYMPTOMS!!

7/09: My Enterolab gluten sensitivity gene testing results indicate I have one Celiac gene and one gluten sensitivity gene.

8/09: I am diagnosed with Celiac based on gene testing results and positive response to diet.

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I cut and pasted info from this site http://www.csaceliacs.org/isearch/index.php?s=school into a packet for my DD's preschool. I requested a meeting with the teacher and director before school started to go over it all and to find out what things would be a appropriate for me to send (for snacks and alternative art supplies).

For my daughter's preschool, I sent:

big bag of glutino pretzels

several bags of m&ms (for special treat substitutions)

big bucket of gluten-free play doh for the whole class to use

big bucket of a variety of gluten-free pastas for art projects

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The one thing that drives me crazy at my son's preschool is the use of food items in arts and crafts. If it were up to me, it just wouldn't happen. You might want to address this as a possibility as well.

He's come home with animal cracker, Cheerios, etc. on projects a LOT. It just might not be something that occurs to a teacher as a danger if it isn't presented in an "eating" way.

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Sorry, I don't mean to sound ignorant. My baby is being tested for celiac's so I am just learning.

But why is it bad for them to even touch macaroni or play duh?

I of course have let my daughter play with play duh in the past and never really noticed a rash of any sort. If it turns out she does have celiac's should she not be playing with play duh?


Bridy mom to:

Dorian 8.29.04

Carissa 8.14.06 - Diary free 8.9.08

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Nothing bad happens by touching it, but if they play with it and then put their hands in their mouths, then they've just glutened themselves. For little ones who don't know any better it is quite a risk.

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Nothing bad happens by touching it, but if they play with it and then put their hands in their mouths, then they've just glutened themselves. For little ones who don't know any better it is quite a risk.

Thank you.

Does anyone know if that molding Sand is gluten free?


Bridy mom to:

Dorian 8.29.04

Carissa 8.14.06 - Diary free 8.9.08

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Thank you.

Does anyone know if that molding Sand is gluten free?

As far as I know, yes it is. If it is the same stuff I'm thinking of, my daughter got some as a gift and I don't recall the ingredients having anything suspect.

There are also some gluten-free play doh recipes around here somewhere.

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No Playdough

Sometimes they use oatmeal for pouring lessons and art projects another no

No pasta for projects

Also if they use food as rewards you may want to bring in rewards for your child.

Hope this helps.


~~~~Gluten Free since 9/2004~~~~~~

Friends may come and go but Sillies are Forever!!!!!!!

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This is all very intresting to me.

My daughter will be going to a parent involved preschool class once a week starting in September. I am really hoping to have some answers before preschool starts so I can talk to her teachers.


Bridy mom to:

Dorian 8.29.04

Carissa 8.14.06 - Diary free 8.9.08

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I want to add that when I was in college working as a preschool aide the teacher would sometimes replace the sand in the sand table with oatmeal or dry pasta. She said it would give the children different sensory experiences. I would watch out for that too.


Amy

1989: I am diagnosed with IBS.

3/08: 8-year-old son diagnosed with Celiac (blood test and biopsy) and allergies to corn, egg whites, soy, peanuts, walnuts, wheat, and clam.

6/08: My Celiac test is negative.

7/08: I go completely gluten free despite negative test and NO MORE IBS SYMPTOMS!!

7/09: My Enterolab gluten sensitivity gene testing results indicate I have one Celiac gene and one gluten sensitivity gene.

8/09: I am diagnosed with Celiac based on gene testing results and positive response to diet.

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I know they do a rice table and have never done anything like pasta. My son has been going to the same preschool for a couple of years now, but that is something to being up incase they ever decide to do that one day.


Bridy mom to:

Dorian 8.29.04

Carissa 8.14.06 - Diary free 8.9.08

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A good thing to send your child off to school with is a pair of child-size vinvyl gloves. A lot of teachers will push off 'oh no, it's a little---it won't hurt you.' Of course, it won't protect your child from hauling off and eating the art supplies, but, it will protect their little hands from breaking out.


-Diganosed with Celiac's Disease on April 15, 2005.

"Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life"-Picasso

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