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Egenglert

Gluten-free Around The World

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Okay, so here are the top ten places I've been that I recommend to anybody with celiac disease.

1. Athens, Greece.

I found a lovely family-owned restaurant in Athens that serves a lot of gluten free food, the Mediterranean octopus was incredible and the owners were so nice. There are typically a lot of places in Athens like that, you just have to look for them.

2. London, England.

Well, first of all, you know there's a Whole Foods there, so that's a place to start, but they have great Turkish and Lebanese restaurants near Half Moon Street, a few blocks away from Buckingham Palace that serve gluten-free food.

3. Tokyo, Japan

A lot of Japanese food lacks wheat, the only things I had to watch out for were Okonomiyaki restaurants, and Ramen houses. Also, be weary of the Soba noodles because, yes they are made of buckwheat, but many now contain wheat.

4. Sydney, Australia

The city is clean and beautiful, there are pizza shops in the suburbs (where I stayed, with friends) that serve a great gluten-free pizza.

5. Auckland, New Zealand

Again, the scenery is wonderful, and the people are great. There's actually celiac-awareness there, so people say "Of course, we can serve gluten-free" when you tell them you can't eat wheat, instead of "So you're on Atkins, um, we can pick off the croutons." like you get where I'm from.

6. Qu

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Thanks! Loved the list.

A question about Japan: Do you have to worry about soy sauce? Or is the soy sauce mostly wheat-free in Japan? We go for sushi alot and I take my own gluten-free soy sauce, because all they seem to use in the US is kikomen (wheat is the second on the ingredient list after soy!).

I can't wait to go to London or Oz/NZ since they are so gluten-aware!

Thanks again,

Pam

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I'm not sure about the soy sauce. you might find a gluten-free brand you know and see if you can find little packets in a small store in Japan. And if not, look for コムギ or 小麦 on the label. I also HIGHLY recommend talking with your hotel's concierge about finding a guide, and you could have him or her take you to a local supermarket (that's what I did).

Also. if and when you do go to Australia, go to Mossman, which is near Cairns up in Queensland.

In New Zealand, go to Rotorua, and Queenstown and, of course, Auckland

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Most of the soy sauce in Japan is aqlso kikkoman or yamasa. Dont use them as they are 60% or more wheat based. I used to bring my own san-J wheat free soy sauces with me but last March found a bunch of different ones based on awa, hie, kibi and sorghum. The first 3 are different types of millets. Some health food stores in Japan also carry a quiona based soy sauce.

We not allowed to post our own web sites on the forum but if you go to my profile you can find the link to a lot of pictures of the gluten-free soy and other products in Japan.

Italy is the most gluten-free friendly place I've been.

Ken

Thanks! Loved the list.

A question about Japan: Do you have to worry about soy sauce? Or is the soy sauce mostly wheat-free in Japan? We go for sushi alot and I take my own gluten-free soy sauce, because all they seem to use in the US is kikomen (wheat is the second on the ingredient list after soy!).

I can't wait to go to London or Oz/NZ since they are so gluten-aware!

Thanks again,

Pam


"Ryo tatereba mi ga tatanu"

If we try to serve both sides, we cannot stand our own ground.

Japanese proverb

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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Add to the list: Southeast Asia.

Granted, there is always a small chance that you can get glutened in a tourist-centric restaurant, but the food in Thailand, Cambodia, and southern Vietnam is naturally gluten-free. The only thing you have to watch for is food with Chinese influences, i.e. soy sauce. Most people in the tourist areas speak decent English. Take the Triumph cards just in case.

I only got glutened once, on my last day in Phuket, but that was 100% because I was stupid. In other words, I let my guard down because the entire trip had been so easy food-wise.


Gluten free since Feb 2006, Dairy and Soy free since 2009

Anemic off and on since 2003

Negative tTG Ab, IgA, Gliadin Ab IgA, wheat allergy (IgE) blood tests (Feb 2006)

Positive wheat allergy skin test(Apr 2006)and dietary response (Feb 2006)

Celiac grandmother (Dx in 1940s, "grew out of it")

Training for my first triathlon to support the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America.

~Amy

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