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Mountaineer Josh

Still Drinking Regular Beer - No Problems

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Just because one says "best regards" does not mean that you mean well in what you have said. I feel that this post has gotten slightly ridiculous and now instead of educating people or allowing people to share their experience, others are poking fun at those people who have attempted to drink light beer calling it a "research project" in the most sarcastic manner. It really does make people not want to post things on this site if they're going to be subject to ridicule and judgements.

modiddly16,

I feel it is very unfortunate, but entirely understandable, that my posts have been misunderstood on this thread. I readily admit that I started out responding to the initial post (concerning drinking gluten beer) very rudely and in a judgemental way. I think I tried to not only apologize for that, but in addition, atone for that by actually drinking a light gluten beer myself. As I noted, it's the first time since being diagnosed in Dec. '07 that I have purposely ingested gluten. Since drinking the beer, in no way have I been insincere or sarcastic. I've just been myself. I drank a gluten, albiet light beer. I reported as to the effects and consequences. I've made my usual comments. I've tried to keep it light (no pun intended). That's it.

best regards, lm

p.s., I always say "best regards". That's my signature. Although I have been known to say "pretty good regards". B)

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Warning, humorous (in my mind) substance ahead.

Start humor: ( yo can skip this part if it offends you)

I looked through several pages and didn't find the link again myself Calicoe, so maybe I am just imagining it. You'd think I could figure out something more interesting to imagine though, drat! Anyway, it seems we just won't know for sure until one of us keels over and kicks the bucket with a lite beer in their hand, or someone with some money does some actual scientifical-like testing. I wonder which will happen first? Tonight I got an email from my sister saying she has been drinking 1 Miller Lite each day to try and get ready for celiac testing, along with eating some other gluten things too.

I think we have now figured out that all of us are ok to drink lite beer but only Mountain Josh should abstain. Ok, totally not true I know. None of us should drink it unless it is tested and proven ok. Sorry Josh, just joking. Personally I am sticking to the potato vodka. Hick-up.

Larry, you are the exception, for having a sense of humour you are hereby sentenced to not drink anything but pure rainwater the rest of your days. By the way I 've got a raincatcher I could sell you cheap for a couple thousand bucks...call 1-800 xxx xxxx with your credit card now!"

: End humor.

OK, so maybe we should get active and ask the CSA if they have done any more testing on beers? They done did it once, so maybe they have done more since 2005? Would there be anyone on the forum who has contacts with the CSA people and can ask the question?

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My problem as a Celiac, is not that I am missing out on bud light, but that I am missing out on all the great flavorful beers there are in the world. When I was diagnosed, I was determined to learn how to brew good gluten free beer, and I started 2 months ago. To me, it is more important to take the time to make a product that I know is gluten-free, and stay healthy, then to cheat with bud light.

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My problem as a Celiac, is not that I am missing out on bud light, but that I am missing out on all the great flavorful beers there are in the world.

That has been my dilemma. I didn't drink Bud Light before I went gluten-free, and if that was my prospect now I still wouldn't drink it. (No offense to anyone on here who drinks it, I just don't care for it) But the days when we would go pick up a random local brew, sometimes based only on whether we liked the packaging, are LOOONG gone. :( sigh

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This is laughable on many levels. Unfortunately, not everything is black and white. I've been confirmed celiac for three years. I know this shatters people's strict interpretation of the gluten free diet, but the bottom line is, light beers don't affect me. My follow-up endoscopy and blood tests have proven this. If I were to eat a sandwhich, I'm sure my antibody counts would jump up. The bottom line is this, beers like Bud Light contain such low levels of gluten, that many celiacs simply don't react to it.

You do realize there are varying degrees of the disease right? Look at the literature.

It is certainly an atypical case, but most cases of Celiac are. From what I understand (and I do need to brush up my reading, I'll admit), the blood tests currently used to test the efficacy of the gluten-free diet are not as sensitive as they might need to be.

A personal story - I have not tested positive on blood tests, but give me barley, rye, oats, or traces of wheat and I can pass for 9 months pregnant in about 2 hours, not to mention 2 weeks of the symptoms none of us enjoy discussing publicly. If I stay away, I feel great.

I think a few others agree, you should be aware you are taking a gamble by drinking these beers. Perhaps they are safer than most realize; however, none as safe as the verified gluten-free options. You may be having "silent" symptoms, there is no tried-and-true way to tell unfortunately. Educate yourself on the consequences, which include diseases that eat your muscles away (your heart is a muscle), and make a wise decision.

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That has been my dilemma. I didn't drink Bud Light before I went gluten-free, and if that was my prospect now I still wouldn't drink it. (No offense to anyone on here who drinks it, I just don't care for it) But the days when we would go pick up a random local brew, sometimes based only on whether we liked the packaging, are LOOONG gone. :( sigh

Does wine interest you? Perhaps you and your companions can take up a slightly different social outing? All is never lost.

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Does wine interest you? Perhaps you and your companions can take up a slightly different social outing? All is never lost.

I do enjoy wine. And perhaps dilemma isn't the proper word. It's not like my social outings are now inhibited, but I really did love to try all the different kinds of beer. Beer and wine are two different things, though. Sometimes, wine just doesn't do. But a nice, cold beer would just hit the spot. And finding the few gluten frees are not so hard, but I miss being able to try different ones when we do go out.

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I do enjoy wine. And perhaps dilemma isn't the proper word. It's not like my social outings are now inhibited, but I really did love to try all the different kinds of beer. Beer and wine are two different things, though. Sometimes, wine just doesn't do. But a nice, cold beer would just hit the spot. And finding the few gluten frees are not so hard, but I miss being able to try different ones when we do go out.

This might not help specifically...

IMHO there is a world of difference to trying a bud-light once in a while and making a habit of it.

I don't disagree that the levels are low; I disagree that consuming low levels over a long time is OK.

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Does wine interest you? Perhaps you and your companions can take up a slightly different social outing? All is never lost.

As sad as it sounds, you have to watch out for a lot of wines as well. I have read (don't have links right now sorry) that some wine companies use gluten lined barrels for aging their wines, don't ask me why, but if you know the kinds you can drink without symptoms, then you're good.

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The ingredients in Asahi beer are:

As ingredients, we are using WATER/BARELY MALT/MAIZE/HOPS/RICE.

We do not use any wheat.

This is the answer I got when I contacted Asahi brewery.

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The ingredients in Asahi beer are:

As ingredients, we are using WATER/BARELY MALT/MAIZE/HOPS/RICE.

We do not use any wheat.

This is the answer I got when I contacted Asahi brewery.

I'm not sure what your point is?

Barley malt is a no-no, so Asahi beer is still no good for celiacs to drink. Sad, because I used to enjoy it evey now and again :(

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As sad as it sounds, you have to watch out for a lot of wines as well. I have read (don't have links right now sorry) that some wine companies use gluten lined barrels for aging their wines, don't ask me why, but if you know the kinds you can drink without symptoms, then you're good.

Actually, wines are completely gluten-free. As an avid wine-only drinker, I went to a number of local vineyards and investigated their gluten-free status. Not a one of them use anything remotely connected to gluten. The only remark that was made concerning this was that maybe, just maybe, companies that mass produce cheap wines MAY use a process that most good vineyards would never use and maybe some gluten containing product may be introduced but the vast majority of good vineyards that produce a quality product use nothing gluten containing. As I am a full blown Celiac, any amount of gluten I would ingest would be noticed. There hasn't been one wine in 4 years that has made me sick. I think this is another urban legend. Gluten is a protein......why would anyone line a barrel with a gluten related product?

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Actually, wines are completely gluten-free. As an avid wine-only drinker, I went to a number of local vineyards and investigated their gluten-free status. Not a one of them use anything remotely connected to gluten. The only remark that was made concerning this was that maybe, just maybe, companies that mass produce cheap wines MAY use a process that most good vineyards would never use and maybe some gluten containing product may be introduced but the vast majority of good vineyards that produce a quality product use nothing gluten containing. As I am a full blown Celiac, any amount of gluten I would ingest would be noticed. There hasn't been one wine in 4 years that has made me sick. I think this is another urban legend. Gluten is a protein......why would anyone line a barrel with a gluten related product?

Well, may want to give this a look.......I called Frey wine last week and they assured me that their wines do not contain gluten, then another poster called them and they said that some of their wines are indeed aged in wheat pasted barrels. We just can't win on this deal sometimes. Mike

http://www.winecrimes.com/winecrimes/latimes.html

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Josh,

Bottom line is, on this forum, if you admit to biting off the corner of a saltine cracker you'll get the cancer lecture. If you accidentally get glutened at a restaurant, you'll get lots and lots of {{{{{HUGS}}}}}

lol see I think it's easy for me because even the thought of biting the corner of a saltine cracker makes me shiver. I just hate the kind of digestive pain and drama I get from ingesting gluten. I have nightmares about it, even...I'll shove something in my mouth unthinkingly, start chewing, and them am like "Omg...this was a mini-muffin!! NOOO! Why did I do that!!?!?!" and try spitting out, freaked out from that innocent momentary lapse of thinking about the gluten-intolerance. :lol: Forget cancer, right now I'm just trying to avoid the pain lol. (obvs. I don't ever want cancer, either, but my point is, that's not the main thing that drives it for me at the moment).

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There is so much variation from human to human it is hard to generalize.

Gotta agree with Tim here. I'm still pretty new to this gluten free lifestyle but the thing that I am learning is that this disease is different for all of. What affects one person may not affect the other. What I do know is that if you have Celiac Disease you should not consume gluten. I realize that some think there might not actually be gluten in some watery domestic light beers but that is not a risk I am personally willing to take. If you say that you can drink regular beer without problem then more power to you!! I'll admit I'm jealous but think I will stick with my gluten free beers, and liquour and wines!

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Well, may want to give this a look.......I called Frey wine last week and they assured me that their wines do not contain gluten, then another poster called them and they said that some of their wines are indeed aged in wheat pasted barrels. We just can't win on this deal sometimes. Mike

http://www.winecrimes.com/winecrimes/latimes.html

I have never heard of Frey wines myself and have never seen them around where I live. I also do not drink white wines, which are generally aged in oak barrels (not all, I agree) because I am allergic to oak and get a severe headache every time I drink one of those oakey wines. I know Chardonnay is and I can't go near the stuff.

What is all boils down to for me is that I have never, in 4 years, gotten sick from wine, ever. I drink wine everyday. Most are aged in stainless steel today and those which aren't, can easily be ascertained as to their gluten-free status, if you talk to someone who knows what they are taking about....usually the wine maker themselves. I have been able to do this. This might be an American thing because I have never heard of a European wine using anything like this, either. I am pretty confidant and have no reservations about ingesting wine on a regular basis. Maybe I'm just lucky or it could be the type of wine I consume. I just feel this is not something to obsess about. Probably 99% of wine is gluten-free and if, by bad luck, you ingest one that isn't (how you will ever know for sure is another thing) you will react and not drink it again. I know I am getting it right because I was diagnosed through blood work so I can re-check that and know for certain whether I am ingesting anything I shouldn't. Not so easy for some other people but if something makes you sick, don't eat or drink it. The vast majority of wines are gluten-free, though, so this is not a huge concern. At least not in the same category as alcohol derived from grains.

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I had a bad reaction to boxed wine once. Lol, I was at someone else's house and had just gone through all this effort to check if some 'orange' vodka they had was gluten free or not, using their computer and all... and since I couldn't find online that it was, I gave in and thought I'd go with the ever-safe wine. But I had a bad reaction...after an hour of drinking it, all my insides were in pain and even breathing in hurt. I was like "what the heck?" So...who knows. I'm going to avoid box wine now. I haven't a problem with regular wine though.

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I have never heard of Frey wines myself and have never seen them around where I live. I also do not drink white wines, which are generally aged in oak barrels (not all, I agree) because I am allergic to oak and get a severe headache every time I drink one of those oakey wines. I know Chardonnay is and I can't go near the stuff.

What is all boils down to for me is that I have never, in 4 years, gotten sick from wine, ever. I drink wine everyday. Most are aged in stainless steel today and those which aren't, can easily be ascertained as to their gluten-free status, if you talk to someone who knows what they are taking about....usually the wine maker themselves. I have been able to do this. This might be an American thing because I have never heard of a European wine using anything like this, either. I am pretty confidant and have no reservations about ingesting wine on a regular basis. Maybe I'm just lucky or it could be the type of wine I consume. I just feel this is not something to obsess about. Probably 99% of wine is gluten-free and if, by bad luck, you ingest one that isn't (how you will ever know for sure is another thing) you will react and not drink it again. I know I am getting it right because I was diagnosed through blood work so I can re-check that and know for certain whether I am ingesting anything I shouldn't. Not so easy for some other people but if something makes you sick, don't eat or drink it. The vast majority of wines are gluten-free, though, so this is not a huge concern. At least not in the same category as alcohol derived from grains.

In my opinion, don't bother with the Frey wine, I got a massive headache within 1/2 hour after having a half glass and 24 hours later.....Well, it is not good. Oh well, so it goes. Mike

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In my opinion, don't bother with the Frey wine, I got a massive headache within 1/2 hour after having a half glass and 24 hours later.....Well, it is not good. Oh well, so it goes. Mike

Are you certain that it's not the sulfites that you're reacting to:

"Contains Sulfites"

Current FDA regulations in the United States require that all wines, both domestic and imports, that contain 10+ ppm of sulfur dioxide state "Contains Sulfites" on the label. This label designation was intended to protect people that may be allergic to sulfites (an estimated 1% of the U.S. population), people with asthma are in the most susceptible category. Signs of sulfite sensitivities include: nasal congestion, headaches, skin flush, broncho-constriction, nausea, abdominal pain, and dizziness. Ironically, because of the technology available to today's winemakers, the amount of sulfur dioxide needed to inhibit oxidation, prevent further fermentation and stabilize the wine is at an all time low. The legal maximum sulfite level for U.S. wines is 350 ppm, with most wines averaging about 125 ppm. Naturally occuring levels of sulfur dioxide in a wine, without chemical additives, would weigh in at around 10-20 ppm.

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I don't obsess over wine either. Not that I can drink it right now... <_<

I know with certainty that I react to sulfites. There are some wines that I can drink 1/2 glass of, and feel like I am going to crawl out of my skin for the next few hours, which usually includes a pretty nasty headache, stuffiness and sometimes airway restriction. I have been known to pour out bottles of wine for this very reason. I have found a few that contain low to no sulfites and they are just fine. But I'm usually willing to try a new wine and my concern is always the sulfites, not gluten. I have not, as of yet, been glutened by wine.

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Are you certain that it's not the sulfites that you're reacting to:

"Contains Sulfites"

Current FDA regulations in the United States require that all wines, both domestic and imports, that contain 10+ ppm of sulfur dioxide state "Contains Sulfites" on the label. This label designation was intended to protect people that may be allergic to sulfites (an estimated 1% of the U.S. population), people with asthma are in the most susceptible category. Signs of sulfite sensitivities include: nasal congestion, headaches, skin flush, broncho-constriction, nausea, abdominal pain, and dizziness. Ironically, because of the technology available to today's winemakers, the amount of sulfur dioxide needed to inhibit oxidation, prevent further fermentation and stabilize the wine is at an all time low. The legal maximum sulfite level for U.S. wines is 350 ppm, with most wines averaging about 125 ppm. Naturally occuring levels of sulfur dioxide in a wine, without chemical additives, would weigh in at around 10-20 ppm.

Well, it is an organic bottle of wine and says on the label no sulfites detected. That probably doesn't mean there is not some naturally occuring amount that is in there. I don't drink much of anything, but have been enjoying a glass now and then of wine and have never had an issue until trying this brand. This sure feels like a glutening and now the DH is flaring. I'll take another look at what else it could have been. HHmmm..... All the best, Mike

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This post is in response to the original questions posted on beer. I should probably start a new string but didn't want to add excess strings out there.

Disclaimer: I personally don't drink lite beers, partly because I don't like them, but mostly because I don't trust that lite beer won't harm me even if you other gluten-free people say it doesn't cause symptoms for you. But, in my previous life, as a gluten consumer, I used to brew a fair amount, and miss variety and good beer.

After starting my gluten-free diet, a brewmiester friend told me that light beers are significantly filtered to the point that they could be considered gluten free (this makes sense with the ELISA tests reported a few posts ago), its also generally true that they are watered down and use gluten-free grains like rice and corn. I don't think there is a filter the beer industry uses that is small enough to filter out single protiens but I could imagine how a majority of the gluten could be filtered out by their processes

Also the fermentation process itself does breaks down the protiens significantly. I have read med reports on the long fermentation processes of sourdough bread, made with wheat flour, that is gluten free and tolerated by celiacs (there is a series of medical articles I've been following published by the med journal APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, main author: Marco Gobbetti, most recent title: Highly Efficient Gluten Degradation by Lactobacilli and Fungal Proteases during Food Processing: New Perspectives for Celiac Disease). The Lactobacilli (one of the the things that make sourdough sour) are supposedly, according to Gobetti and others articles, very active in breaking down gluten. I haven't seen anything on Saccharomyces (the main beer yeast) and it's potential, or not-so-much-potential, gluten destroying properties. Although Lambic beer, and other spontaneous fermentation beers, are generally aided in part by lactobacillus...

Either way I recommend if you don't like current gluten-free beers and crave good beer, brew your Own (gluten-free beer)... And share your notes with me...

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Wow I don't see how anyone could CHOOSE to drink beer. YuckYUCK YUUUUUCK man..

I don't drink alcohol at all, it's all nasty.. but I definitely react to beer, no doubt about that.

I react to the tiniest trace amounts of almost anything. I can't eat oats.

Beer.. just don't do it! I used to think I could do things "sometimes" too.. little did I know

how bad I was hurting myself.

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For the last year or so I have been drinking Heineken without any issues. I have tried a few other beers, like Summit and Sam Adam's and have had issues. I usually try a new beer when I don't have any plans the next day to prepare for the fallout. From what I've seen on other posts it seems that each person has to find out through trial and error what works for them. Next weekend I'm going to try Amstel Light to see if I have any problems. After that I'm going to try Bud/Bud Light just for availability sake. We'll see what happens. I might be sick the next day but I love beer so it's worth it for me.

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For the last year or so I have been drinking Heineken without any issues. I have tried a few other beers, like Summit and Sam Adam's and have had issues. I usually try a new beer when I don't have any plans the next day to prepare for the fallout. From what I've seen on other posts it seems that each person has to find out through trial and error what works for them. Next weekend I'm going to try Amstel Light to see if I have any problems. After that I'm going to try Bud/Bud Light just for availability sake. We'll see what happens. I might be sick the next day but I love beer so it's worth it for me.

You have resurrected a 2 1/2 year old post, which is fine. I'm glad that you enjoy your beer adventures, but have you considered what your "fallout" is doing to your body - YOUR ENTIRE BODY? Nawl, guess not.

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