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jcnfc

Daycare Vs. Nanny

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I don't know if anyone has had similar struggles but since my daughter has been diagnosed I am leaning toward having a nanny. She is 22 months and was diagnosed 4 weeks ago. The potential nanny I have in mind was her teacher in the infant room at day care. My daughter loves her however I struggle if this is the right decision. Any thoughts?

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I don't know if anyone has had similar struggles but since my daughter has been diagnosed I am leaning toward having a nanny. She is 22 months and was diagnosed 4 weeks ago. The potential nanny I have in mind was her teacher in the infant room at day care. My daughter loves her however I struggle if this is the right decision. Any thoughts?

I would think daycare would be unavoidable cross contamination hell unless the entire home or facility was gluten free. I think if the nanny is affordable, especially as your daughter already knows and loves her, this would be far and away the best decision.

Just curious - what issues are you struggling with in making up your mind?


Sandi ~ learning to live in a world obsessed and infested with wheat.

"You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows" probably was not referring to us . . .

"For the love of money gluten is a root of all sorts of evil, and some by longing for it have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many griefs." (apologies to 1 Timothy 6:10 (NASB)

The person we most dislike is still a soul for whom Christ died. (David Jeremiah)

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My daughter has been a bit shy and is really learning to interact with different people and kids at day care. Plus, they have structured learning objectives. This can be more difficult with a nanny. Also, the nanny that my daughter loves does not have a degree and has no nanny experience; she has about 4 years experience in a day care facility. My daughter is beginning (now that she is feeling better) to enjoy day care however it is a long day and I'm concerned while she is still too young to understand that she will get cross contaminated no matter how much the teacher's try.

I just nervous about making the right decision.

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I will always pick one on one care (nanny) If you TRUST this person with your child, then this is your answer. There is know reason why this nanny cant teach your child the essentuals. Im sure the nanny will still let your child mingle or interact with other people. There would be no reason not to. lots of love is the key

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Hi ! I thought I'd add in my two cents. I used to work at a daycare, and have taught early childhood education in Montessori Schools. I have also been a nanny twice.

I never had a kid who was Celiac, but I did have kids who were allergic to mix nuts, strawberries, etc. In the daycares/montessori school's, the cook's were always very careful about allergens, and any child that had allergens had a sticker at their place at the table that said what the allergens are, so the teachers could double check if needbe. However, I think that the possibility of cross contamination for gluten is probably much higher and more probable. With that being said, if you get a nanny - I would make sure your daughter has plenty of interaction with other kids and different environments, because that will make starting school easier (on both you and her) :P

Best of luck with everything!


*Jessica*

IgG + IgA + TtG -

Family History of Celiac

See 'about me' for more info

gluten-free Since: 11/02/08

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My daughter has been a bit shy and is really learning to interact with different people and kids at day care. Plus, they have structured learning objectives. This can be more difficult with a nanny. Also, the nanny that my daughter loves does not have a degree and has no nanny experience; she has about 4 years experience in a day care facility. My daughter is beginning (now that she is feeling better) to enjoy day care however it is a long day and I'm concerned while she is still too young to understand that she will get cross contaminated no matter how much the teacher's try.

I just nervous about making the right decision.

From the dawn of Creation until a generation or so ago there was no such thing as daycare because dads were able to provide for the moms who stayed at home raising the family. Children did just fine without all of the structured learning that takes place in daycare centers and pre-schools. Children played with other neighborhood children, with siblings if there were any, with kids at church, whatever. No one entered school not ever having interacted with other children.

My limited experience as a mom (one kid) plus 18 years of working with kids at church has shown me that at 22 months many kids have not yet developed socially. That means some other part of your daughter is growing and developing. Soon it will be "social's" turn to grow and develop.

Many kids at church are home schooled. They have never been to daycare or pre-school or in a regular classroom. They are every bit as socially competent as the kids who attend schools. They are almost always better behaved than classroom-schooled kids because they have limited to no exposure to the bad behavior other kids pick up from TV and think is acceptable,

If you are concerned about socializing your daughter, have nanny take her to the park or to play with neighborhood children. If your prospective nanny is good with children, and you trust her, I would not worry about a degree. She has four years of experience which is four years more than many new moms have.

God gave moms some powerful instincts for a reason. In the end, trust those instincts when you make your decision.


Sandi ~ learning to live in a world obsessed and infested with wheat.

"You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows" probably was not referring to us . . .

"For the love of money gluten is a root of all sorts of evil, and some by longing for it have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many griefs." (apologies to 1 Timothy 6:10 (NASB)

The person we most dislike is still a soul for whom Christ died. (David Jeremiah)

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I will add my experience for what it's worth..

However, I think that the possibility of cross contamination for gluten is probably much higher and more probable. With that being said, if you get a nanny - I would make sure your daughter has plenty of interaction with other kids and different environments, because that will make starting school easier (on both you and her) :P

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My dd never once got glutened from daycare, preschool or elementary school so far. My son has twice, not because of cc issues but because he grabbed something from someone else's plate. He was about 30mo at diagnosis and dd was 4--there was definetly a difference in understanding between the 2 kids. Socially, I really believe they need to be around other kids, I'll go more into that after the next quote. Also, from what I've seen with starting kindergarten (You have a few years ;) ) my dd had a huge advantage over many kids in her class. We had her in preschool 3 days a week (I work 3 days a week) and we also did a lot of work with her at home. We started her in K before she turned 5 and we had to have her tested in to make sure she was ready, she tested into the 2nd grade level for everything. For us, we twice had the option of a nanny, but we also have childcare and private preschool where I work and I never regretted the decision to keep them at the hospital with me.

Beyond the Celiac issue, when you have 1 person only watching your child, you are at the mercy of their health and tendancy to call in sick, do you have a backup plan in case that happens? This happened to a girlfriend of mine, and they ened up putting their son in a daycare because of this.

My limited experience as a mom (one kid) plus 18 years of working with kids at church has shown me that at 22 months many kids have not yet developed socially. That means some other part of your daughter is growing and developing. Soon it will be "social's" turn to grow and develop.

Many kids at church are home schooled. They have never been to daycare or pre-school or in a regular classroom. They are every bit as socially competent as the kids who attend schools. They are almost always better behaved than classroom-schooled kids because they have limited to no exposure to the bad behavior other kids pick up from TV and think is acceptable,

God gave moms some powerful instincts for a reason. In the end, trust those instincts when you make your decision.

I agree that at 22 months, kids aren't socially developed, but I don't think they are socially developed for MANY years. It's more of a constant development which starts very early. They are learning from every person they come in contact with. I respectfully disagree with the comment about picking up bad habits from other kids--while I agree this happens (more than we'd all like) at that point it is your responsibility as a parent to teach them what is acceptable for the rules in your home. I personally think it is good for kids to also learn from other's behaviors. I also think it's important for them to learn that what's OK in some homes isn't OK for my home--i.e certain language, movies, "characters" (Hanna Montana for my 6yod, BRATZ dolls--just our choices). I take all of those opportunities to open up a dialog with my kids, even at that age--they like to hear you talk to them. I've done this since the kids were born and my 6yo (almost 7 :o ) still wants to talk non-stop, and she asks some very difficult and sometimes grown up questions, but I take advantage of every question.

Anyway, I'm getting off the subject, there are pros and cons for daycares, in my experience, Celiac or not, I'm for the daycare...


Rachelle 20dance.gif

Daughter diagnosed 1/06 bloodwork and biopsy
-gluten-free since 1/06

Son tested negative-bloodwork (8/07), intestinal issues prompted biospy (3/08), results negative, but very positive dietary response, Dr. diagnosed Celiac disease (3/8)

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My 2 cents... I had a day care for 9 years, before I ever heard of the word Celiac. I only ever had 1 allergy problem-lactose. It was a slight problem but the child was 6 and told me what she could/couldn't have.

If you choose daycare, the help needs to know all about cc. They might not get it and your dd is too young to tell them. Maybe she could wear a sticker or button for awhile that states what she is allergic to with your phone # on it so they could quickly call you for any question.

As for choosing, I think it all depends on how sensitive your dd is.

You could try a nanny for awhile for your peace of mind and her safety. Then as your dd learns and understands better, get her to a daycare before she starts preschool, to give her a chance to become social and not fear the kids. One of my most difficult kids was an only child (4 yrs old), she is 18 now and she is still difficult. Her mom and I became best friends.

Some kids will offer her their food b/c they like to share. Your dd won't understand why she can't have the same things as the others. Also find out if any other child has Celiac or allergies so she won't be the only one "different".

You could also set up a meeting and explain to the kids what gluten does to your dd and even send home a paper to each parent. I got papers from the health department and from school sent to me whenever head lice, fifths disease, child abuse, chicken pox, etc. was going around. They were very helpful. I kept a sharp eye out during those times and explained to the kids why I had to have them bend their head down so I could check them for lice. Other kids could help her too when they understand.

Your child could be first to wash, have her own colored plate, blanket, etc. that is totally different from the others. Label everything with her name or a symbol.

I think it would be good if once in awhile you took in gluten-free cookies or a snack so everyone can taste how good they are. There could be some issues with kids making fun of her, this way they will look forward to her kind of "sharing". :)

Tough decision I am sure.


Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden and I will give you rest. Matthew 11:28

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My 2 cents... I had a day care for 9 years, before I ever heard of the word Celiac. I only ever had 1 allergy problem-lactose. It was a slight problem but the child was 6 and told me what she could/couldn't have.

If you choose daycare, the help needs to know all about cc. They might not get it and your dd is too young to tell them. Maybe she could wear a sticker or button for awhile that states what she is allergic to with your phone # on it so they could quickly call you for any question.

As for choosing, I think it all depends on how sensitive your dd is.

You could try a nanny for awhile for your peace of mind and her safety. Then as your dd learns and understands better, get her to a daycare before she starts preschool, to give her a chance to become social and not fear the kids. One of my most difficult kids was an only child (4 yrs old), she is 18 now and she is still difficult. Her mom and I became best friends.

Some kids will offer her their food b/c they like to share. Your dd won't understand why she can't have the same things as the others. Also find out if any other child has Celiac or allergies so she won't be the only one "different".

You could also set up a meeting and explain to the kids what gluten does to your dd and even send home a paper to each parent. I got papers from the health department and from school sent to me whenever head lice, fifths disease, child abuse, chicken pox, etc. was going around. They were very helpful. I kept a sharp eye out during those times and explained to the kids why I had to have them bend their head down so I could check them for lice. Other kids could help her too when they understand.

Your child could be first to wash, have her own colored plate, blanket, etc. that is totally different from the others. Label everything with her name or a symbol.

I think it would be good if once in awhile you took in gluten-free cookies or a snack so everyone can taste how good they are. There could be some issues with kids making fun of her, this way they will look forward to her kind of "sharing". :)

Tough decision I am sure.

Having different colored things I believe could be a big issue when the child gets a little older. All the others will wonder why she has different things. Children can be very cruel and the teasing could be devastating to your child.

But for the moment while she is young this could be a way to handle child care at a facility till she gets a little older

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Although I am a working mom, myself, I must say I do agree with everything home_based_mom said in her post.

The risk in day care, especially with toddlers, is that the staff cannot police every crumb every second, and another toddler might drop gluten, offer your daughter gluten when nobody is looking, or even innocently--and quietly-- put it on her plate.

I'm in a job where our maternity leave policy totally sucks, and I can't leave the job and then ever expect to get my job back, nor can I find a similar position anywhere in the same city, so I was totally stuck having to go through the nanny/daycare dilemma when my kids were babies.

That said, if I could do it again, I wish I had fought harder for more unpaid time off, and if I had been in a situation where I could have left the workforce for a few years with a high likelihood of returning to a similar position, I would have taken that route.

On the other hand, my mother was a stay-at-home mom, and she hated being that! So everyone is different, and if Mama ain't happy, ain't NOBODY happy.

But now that you are dealing with some health issues with pretty serious ramifications for your little one, you might want to reconsider the whole working mom thing. Do what's right for you and your family, and listen to your gut! :lol:

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My son is an only child and I am very glad that I have him in daycare. He interacts with other children and has formed many friendships there, including a strong bond with his daycare lady. He has learned many social lessons there that would not be as easy to learn at home alone with no other children. His daycare provider is fantastic about the gluten free diet, and the other children are so understanding. This is another important lesson my son has learned early because of daycare, that he often eats different food than the other kids and that is ok. You just have to take your time and find someone that will work with the gluten free diet and someone who is willing to learn about cross contamination. You may also need to provide the daycare with the tools to keep your child safe. I provide a toaster, cutting board, baking sheet, a small pot and pan and cooking utensils. I also provide specialty gluten free specialty foods and mainstream food information.

Take your time and weigh your options, and I'm confident you will make the best decision. :)


Jenny

Son 6 yrs old, Positive blood work, Outstanding dietary response, no biopsy.

Household mostly gluten free since 3/07

Me: HLA-DQ 02 & 0302 (DQ 08), which I ran & analyzed myself!Currently gluten lite, negative tTG, asymptomatic

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Here is my thought, Nanny's are great your child will get one on one care, but will this person be up to taking her to play groups, are you up to putting her into other groups to give her the social interaction with other children. Will this person teach your child the foundations she needs? These are the question I would ask your self.

I am a preschool teacher and my son is 4 and has been gluten-free for now 9 weeks and the entire staff works hard to keep him safe. They know not to give him anything unless calling me (if im not there) or i send it. He is getting ready to go into a new classroom and i have been very open with this teacher. He has not had any problems with CC and he takes his own snacks and lunches.

Its up to you in the end, the other thing is you can do the nanny thing for a bit and then when she is a little older and she has learned what she can and can not have then put her back in. I have kept him in school one bc i dont have a choose but two because he only has a year before Kindergarten and I can not be there holding his hand. He has to be able to handle a bit of this on his own when my husband and i are not there.

Again its all up to you in the end. Hope you find your answer god bless

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I have had a nanny and daycare with both children. My first son didn't start to really talk or play with other children at (30 months) until he went to daycare. That was a good move for him. I think part of the decision depends on the child. You know what's best.

Now on to ds2- the preemie with allergies... I think in spite of my attempt to educate our nanny, he still got his hands on wheat, etc. He was always sick with dark circles under the eyes and D. It was so bad the sitter didn't want to keep him while pregnant. We just enrolled him in daycare, and they have forms (from the Dept. of Social Services) that the doctor fills out and explains any health/medical issues. I have also spoken with the teacher and day care director about my concerns. I have opted to provide all of his snacks/food. I'll let you know how it goes when he starts next week.

I like the daycare because the state has regulations regarding food allergies and intolerance. The staff is also trained on these issues (at least in my state).

Buena Suerte (Good luck!)


Knitting is a gluten free hobby!

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I toally agree with celiac mommy / rachelle..my mom says this all the time because she is a 1st grade teacher and kids need that social involvement before school. The whole thing about influences from bad behavior, children should be taught at home what is acceptable and what is not, also if the teacher is a good one they will put a stop to inappropriate behavior anyway! I went to a daycare for 3 years because my parents weren't ready to put me in pre school as a celiac(this is not that they doubted anyone it's that they weren't completely confident with the kitchen thing and wanted a smaller atmosphere, it was also a catholic preschool/elementary school where my dad was the principal and yet still they just weren't ready) but they did not hire a nanny because they were both in childhood education, mom in early childhood and strongly believe that children need to be introduced to other kids. In the three years I was in pre school I did get glutened...but it wasn't from daycare, it was from trial and error, because sometimes as hard as you try something goes wrong. On the other side of things if the nanny could bring the child to a ''play group" or a gymboree gym or baby/toddler yoga or something to get the child to get used to other kids that is great(or you guys could go to a mommy and me class). Hope this helps you out...and sorry about the babbling I am very talkative tonight. :P

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wow, I'm surprised by some of the answers. I guess I don't understand why anyone who could afford a nanny situation would prefer to send their child to a daycare. Even apart from the whole gluten situation. Add in the gluten situation, and I'm not sure why its even a question.

Rarely, has a child sufferred from having one-on-one attention from someone they love every day. There are many ways to "socialize" you child without putting them in a daycare situation. perhaps a nice private preschool as they get older for 1/2 days.

Take advantage of the care your child could get from a loving individual caregiver.


Janet

DH diagnosed 4/2003. gluten free (for the most part) since.

Daughter diagnosed Celiac by biopsy after + endomysial and TTG Antibodies 6/08. (7 yo)

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wow, I'm surprised by some of the answers. I guess I don't understand why anyone who could afford a nanny situation would prefer to send their child to a daycare. Even apart from the whole gluten situation. Add in the gluten situation, and I'm not sure why its even a question.

Rarely, has a child sufferred from having one-on-one attention from someone they love every day. There are many ways to "socialize" you child without putting them in a daycare situation. perhaps a nice private preschool as they get older for 1/2 days.

Take advantage of the care your child could get from a loving individual caregiver.

I totally agree-and I believe the social development can happen from playdates and from the many classes (music, Mommy and Me, Gymboree, tumbling, dance, T-ball, art, swimming, etc.) offered for toddlers.

I know many home-schooled children, although I did not home-school my own children. The home-schooled children I have met are not only totally socially well-adjusted, but they usually have far better manners than most of the kids whom I have seen at daycares and preschools.

My kids went part-time to a daycare that was staffed by WONDERFUL people, who actually taught me a lot of organizational and parenting skills (i am still in awe of the women who were in charge of the infant room, as they juggled 4 babies each, and I hardly ever heard any baby cry for more than a minute or two, as their needs were met so quickly. But as marvelous as they were, I could see that many of the toddlers who were in full-time daycare seemed to be starving for one-on-one attention.

With toddlers, the law allows for 6-8 toddlers (18 months-2 years) per caregiver. All you have to do is watch "Jon and Kate Plus 8" and you get a very clear idea how tough it is to handle 6-8 at a time, even with 2 parents who obviously adore their kids.

The one advantage of daycare over nanny is that with a nanny, everything is behind closed doors. You have NO IDEA what really is going on when you are not home, unless you have a hidden camera. In a daycare, there are always other adults present, as well as parents coming in and out, who can let you know if something doesn't seem right, either with your child, another child, or with one of the caregivers.

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With toddlers, the law allows for 6-8 toddlers (18 months-2 years) per caregiver.

Ours is different, ours is no more than 5 per giver (I think it's Oregon law) and no matter how many kids in the class, they have at least 2 teachers and no more than 10 kids per classroom. Once they hit pre-school at 3-5 years of age, it moves to up to 10 per teacher, but our preschool class my son will be entering in September will have no more than 17 kids and no less than 3 teachers.

We have the means for a nanny, but we chose the daycare. I have to say a majority of the reason is that it's private and on-site of where I work and it's also a REALLY good school with really high standards.

I agree that there are daycares where the kids get a lack of attention and even neglect, but if that's the route you choose, it's up to you to make sure it's the right environment for your precious child. I have nothing but praises and love for our daycare and between the 2 kids, we've been there for nearly 7 years.


Rachelle 20dance.gif

Daughter diagnosed 1/06 bloodwork and biopsy
-gluten-free since 1/06

Son tested negative-bloodwork (8/07), intestinal issues prompted biospy (3/08), results negative, but very positive dietary response, Dr. diagnosed Celiac disease (3/8)

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It also depends on what kind of kid you've got. A super active kid in a colder climate might do better in a kid space that a professional daycare offers. We had a lovely nanny when my son was a baby, but he ultimately needed more stimulation than one person could provide once he was mobile and the winter hit. The structure and routine and the interaction with the other kids were very important to him and he really thrived. I know older toddlers and preschool aged kids that do just great with a nanny or whatever.

WRT gluten, my son's daycare is dealing with his celiac and anaphalactic dairy/nut allergies in the same classroom in different kids. They've made every accommodation we've asked for. He has his own water pitcher, fruit plate and the always have some gluten free crunchy for snack and the people preparing the snack know to wash their hands first and to use clean plates. All the kids bring their own lunch, so that's not an issue. A well managed daycare can deal with it just fine. It's just a question of what you think works best for your family. It's nice having a nanny come to your house and not to have to deal with drop off and pick up issues. But it's nice to know your kids are in a really safe playspace with multiple adults and consistent friends and routines.

You really can't go wrong.

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I have been a nanny for 9 years, taught in a preschool, and my mom had a home based daycare when I was growing up. I also have a 10 month old who is wheat sensitive, and product sensitive (wash, lotion, sunscreen...). The 2-year-old I nanny for is lactose intolerant, and has food sensitivities that cause massive eczema. After having my son, I was offered both a teaching job at a child care center, and two nanny positions. After spending a day in each environment, I knew that nannying would be the best option for my child. As much as we as teachers, try to keep things separate, there is no guarantee. Allergies and sensitivities are clearly marked, but there are often so many things going on, and so many children to keep track of, things get overlooked. I wasn't willing to take that chance with him. Luckily, I have a wonderful family, who allows my son to come with me to work. Having two product/food sensitive children can be a challenge at times, but I feel that it's easier with the one to two (soon to be three) ratio is much easier to manage. They each have their own creams, lotions, wipes, foods that they can tolerate, and I have to manage the non cross-contamination. It can be hard enough with two to keep track of - The little one I nanny has rice milk/soy milk, and my son has breastmilk/formula - they do try to drink from eachothers cups, and I can't imagine a daycare/center room with a dozen children, and a dozen cups. At this age, they don't understand that the cup is someone elses, and it will make them not feel well.

Bottom line, look at the child/adult ratio, see if there are other children who have sensitivities, and how the cross contamination is dealt with. Go with your gut instinct. I have always made sure to have the children I care for interact with other children. Being a nanny can be an isolating job. You're with children all day, and don't have much adult interaction. Playgroups, classes, and trips to the parks/zoo/museums, are great activities to socialize, and get a break from the norm. I always look for other nannies at the park, and we set up playdates.

There are pros and cons to both situations. Do what is best for you and your child.

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The decision to hire a one-on-one nanny or to provide group oriented daycare whether this is home-based or in a center is a personal one and not a right or wrong answer type of question. The longitudinal research does not show that either is better, just that the quality is what counts. As for one of the parents staying home, it does not matter whether it is the father or the mother as fathers do just as good of a job as mothers. Realistically, not everyone has the option financially and/or career wise to make the move to stay home and/or work part-time and must decide upon using a nanny versus sending their child to daycare. Returning to the work force after a leave of absence can be difficult for some career professional men and women. For some, it would be career-suicide to stay out of the work force a few years and then return because of the fast changing pace of their profession and due to the difficulties in convincing employers to hire someone who hasn't worked in the profession in a few years. A nanny is not always the best option for some families, especially for those who have recently adopted a child and need to maintain boundaries with external caretakers and the child. There is also the possibility of the nanny needing a day off and of being sick. So, whether someone stays home or works and whether someone has a nanny or sends their child to daycare really is a personal decision that should be based on one's finances, professional career, the quality of daycares and nannies available, and individual needs of the family and child.

The gluten free diet would require a nanny who agrees to completely follow the gluten free diet and who will not think that a little gluten is no big deal. The same goes with the daycare. But, what if the daycare does not understand what it means to be gluten-free? Then, we have to educate them. I'm interested in hearing what others have done to educate and prepare the daycare for a child with celiac disease.

For my husband and I, who only adopted our 2 year old three months ago, a nanny would not feel right since we have been working very hard with bonding and attachment. For children who are adopted, it's not recommended for others outside of the mother and father to step in and be the primary caretaker, which would sort of be like a nanny. A daycare teacher has more boundaries and there is less confusion to the child. In addition, we are both career professionals who cannot temporarily leave our professions for a couple of years and then return back easily. We will be sending our child to daycare after having been home with her for four months. A month ago, she was tested and had a biopsy that confirmed that she has celiac disease. As a result, we are in the process of transitioning to a gluten-free lifestyle.

If you have any suggestions for us with regards to educating the daycare staff, please post them. We are particularly looking for daycare facility/teacher handouts, but do not want any that reference other dietary issues and/or ADHD/behavioral issues as these do not apply to our daughter. She has celiac disease only.

If you have any ideas on snacks and lunch menus for a two year old, that would be helpful. We will need to provide these for the daycare. The current menu at the daycare for three weeks include the following gluten items: cheerios, cheese pasta with marinara, graham crackers, bagel, hamburger on a bun, fig newton, whole grain bread, chili and beans, corn bread, soft pretzel, apple pancakes, chicken strips, whole grain cracker, string cheese, blueberry muffin, chicken enchilada casserole, granola bar, turkey hot dogs, marinara sauce, chicken nuggets, zucchini bread, bread sticks with marinara sauce, cheese pizza, cheese crackers, English muffin with jelly, beef stew with carrots and potatoes, granola bars, turkey tortilla, cheese wrap, wheat crackers, golden grahams, chex mix, bean and cheese burritos with salsa, and sugar cookies. If you have ideas on substitutions and where to obtain them, that would be helpful. We will be sending all of her foods and snacks to the daycare; however, we'd like for her to eat similar items, just gluten-free.

Looking forward to your suggestions!

Tawnya K.

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You might consider contacting you local Celiac support group. They may know of someone who does home daycare in a gluten free household.

I hope whatever decision you make turns out well.


Phyllis

Gluten Free - 30 years

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If you have any suggestions for us with regards to educating the daycare staff, please post them. We are particularly looking for daycare facility/teacher handouts, but do not want any that reference other dietary issues and/or ADHD/behavioral issues as these do not apply to our daughter. She has celiac disease only.

If you have any ideas on snacks and lunch menus for a two year old, that would be helpful. We will need to provide these for the daycare. The current menu at the daycare for three weeks include the following gluten items: cheerios, cheese pasta with marinara, graham crackers, bagel, hamburger on a bun, fig newton, whole grain bread, chili and beans, corn bread, soft pretzel, apple pancakes, chicken strips, whole grain cracker, string cheese, blueberry muffin, chicken enchilada casserole, granola bar, turkey hot dogs, marinara sauce, chicken nuggets, zucchini bread, bread sticks with marinara sauce, cheese pizza, cheese crackers, English muffin with jelly, beef stew with carrots and potatoes, granola bars, turkey tortilla, cheese wrap, wheat crackers, golden grahams, chex mix, bean and cheese burritos with salsa, and sugar cookies. If you have ideas on substitutions and where to obtain them, that would be helpful. We will be sending all of her foods and snacks to the daycare; however, we'd like for her to eat similar items, just gluten-free.

Looking forward to your suggestions!

Tawnya K.

Tawnya,

Welcome! You might want to post this (if you haven't already) in a different thread-create one specific to your queations, I think you will find more responses...

For us, I work 3 days a week, so I supply cereal for the preschool. I make sure on the days I'm home, the kids get hot breakfasts. With supplying all the snacks and packing lunches for 2 kids and myself, I can't worry about making them breakfasts too. Anyway, I have a large snack box in the classroom and I've filled it with all things pre-schooler: graham crackers, animal crackers, Glutino ritz style crackers, pretzles, gluten-free oreos, cereal bars etc... so the teachers can match up his snack with what they're having. Most of the time, they open the box and let him choose, which he's completely content with. For lunches, I will bring sandwiches, leftovers, quesadillas, etc... for his main dish and the school has vegetables and fruit for him (plus fruit for breakfast). I tried matching the menu when my dd was there, and it worked for a while, but it was too much for me. I started having them help menu plan and let them help make lunches. At 2 years old, I'm not sure how much your dd will care about having the same things as the other kids. Since this is pretty new to her, you might want to stick with the food items she likes best to keep it familiar and tasty to her. My ds was diagnosed at 2 and I have to say it was a little difficult to keep him from running to the table and grab food from other kid's plates. This only lasted a few weeks. The repetition of telling him he had to eat HIS food on HIS plate over and over, and keeping a teacher at the table BEFORE he came over made a difference as well. At this point, he could honestly care less what I pack and he would be completely content eating a sandwich every day if I let him. Today they both had PB and banana sandwich on waffles (I was out of bread and they LOVED it!!) I made a spread sheet of simple safe and unsafe foods for his teachers to reference. I have a binder in the classroom with all the information on celiac disease and more detailed lists on safe and unsafe foods. I have met with all of the teachers, all children's allergy info is listed in the same area and any new teacher makes sure to reference it before touching the food because there are other kids with various allergies or dietary/religious food preferences. It's all gone pretty smoothly.

Hope this helps some! :)


Rachelle 20dance.gif

Daughter diagnosed 1/06 bloodwork and biopsy
-gluten-free since 1/06

Son tested negative-bloodwork (8/07), intestinal issues prompted biospy (3/08), results negative, but very positive dietary response, Dr. diagnosed Celiac disease (3/8)

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