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Jo Ann

Agave Netar

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Does anyone have any baking recipes using Agave Nectar in place of sugar? This is safe for diabetics since it does not increase blood sugar, and it's suppose to be much healthier than artificial sweeteners. Our daughter, after years of health problems, was finally diagnosed with Adrenal Fatigue. She is on a very restricted, but healthy, diet. She is allergic to dairy and feels much better eating gluten-free with our grandson. She longs for a few sweets, like cookies, cupcakes, etc., but I haven't found any recipes designed to use Agave. Would appreciate your help. Thanks! Jo Ann :)

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Just so you know, Agave Nectar *does* raise blood sugar in diabetics. They are lying when they say that. For me it's no different than sugar or honey. I have not used it in baking. Just in raw recipes and I always use far less than is called for. But I don't like sweet foods.

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It has a much lower level on the Glycemic Index, so some diabetics can tolerate it.

That being said, you can use it 1:1 for honey, maple syrup, et cetera, and use 3/4 c. per 1 c. of sugar, adjusting liquids by about 1/4 cup (use your eye - that is what I do).

Have fun!


Gluten-free, Vegan

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Does anyone have any baking recipes using Agave Nectar in place of sugar? This is safe for diabetics since it does not increase blood sugar, and it's suppose to be much healthier than artificial sweeteners. Our daughter, after years of health problems, was finally diagnosed with Adrenal Fatigue. She is on a very restricted, but healthy, diet. She is allergic to dairy and feels much better eating gluten-free with our grandson. She longs for a few sweets, like cookies, cupcakes, etc., but I haven't found any recipes designed to use Agave. Would appreciate your help. Thanks! Jo Ann :)

Here is a link I found. I have some agave but have only used it for tea. I am still getting a feel for baking gluten free so am somewhat chicken to add something new to the mix!

I don't see why the recipes from that site cannot be used but adjusting everything to be gluten free. You can always sub out 1/4 cup of the flour blend with other more healthy flours. Isn't the coconut flour supposed to be beneficial, or even some of the nut flours?

Best of luck with this and please post back your results.

http://www.blueagavenectar.com/agavenectarrecipes.html


~Barb

Gluten Free October 18, 2007

YIPPEE for Gluten free

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Julie, appreciate your comments about agave raising blood sugar. Have you ever heard or read of Dr. Oz who often appears on "Oprah"? I don't watch her, but Dr. Oz was the one who said agave was best for everyone, even diabetics, because it does not raise blood sugar levels like other sweeteners. Our daughter is not diabetic, but her doctor told her, too, that agave was the best and safest sweetner for everyone. Sorry if I hit a wrong note with this, but it's just what I've heard from doctors. Fortunately, no one in our family is diabetic, but our daughter's diet is very restricted. We have seen how much it has helped her. A nutritionist friend said that they are finding that "you are what you eat." They are finding that nutrition is far more important than they thought. They are even trying it in cases of infertility. My problem is trying to use agave (liquid) in place of sugar in recipes, not knowing how to safely make the substitution. I had my share of failure baking gluten-free, but using a liquid in place of a dry crystal is a challenge, and I thought maybe someone had a recipe source. I will check out your reference, baking barb. Thanks to all for responding to my request. Jo Ann

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I have not tried it yet... am curious though!

be well! :)


Collette

Positive Bloodwork Oct 1st 2007. Gluten-free 3 YEARS Oct 1st!

Dairy & Soy free since Dec 1st 2007.

Potato free since January 3rd 2008.

Remaining Nightshades since April 1st 2008. Back on September 2010. :)

Developed Rice & Tapioca & Corn Intolerances...

NO Carageenan.

In a constant state of evolution... sending love! :)

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I tried it. I never really cared for honey. This is really good. :P


Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden and I will give you rest. Matthew 11:28

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I found one today I think you would be interested in. I posted it : chocolate chip cookies.

Really good, good for you and easy!

Here's the link:

http://recipezaar.com/279485

I skimmed through some agave nectar web sites. I found a good one that explains alot @

http://www.sweetsavvy.com/sweeteners/summa...id=Agave+Nectar

One site said it helps with constipation...hmmm, I wonder.


Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden and I will give you rest. Matthew 11:28

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I've heard it is much higher fructose than even high fructose corn syrup. That is something that is being linked with a lot of problems like liver disease, insulin resistance and other stuff. Frankly, I think some the non-caloric sweeteners are healthier.

Here's some info regarding the fructose in agave:

FRUCTOSE

When pressed from the plant, the agave juice is about 90 percent inulin-fructooligosaccharides. The processing breaks this down into into fructose and dextrose.

The fructose that comes from processing corn into high fructose corn syrup is harmful to health.

There is a difference, however, between the fructose in agave nectar and the fructose in high fructose corn syrup. Suppliers of agave say that the fructose in agave is a slow release, and does not stimulate the insulin secretion that causes blood sugar rise. High fructose corn syrup does make blood sugar rise.

Taken from the very same website listed above.

I think that natural sweeteners are healthier than chemical laden man made sweeteners.


Jayhawkmom -

Mom of three....

Jay - 11

Bean - 8

Ian - 3

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Agave raises my blood sugar just like anything else. If you have a glucometer, try it yourself. Make muffins with honey and test 1 hour after eating. Then on another day, make the same exact muffins with Agave and test after an hour of eating. I get the same results. So much for "slower release"......

And I do believe it would lead to liver issues and insulin resistance much more readily than honey and even sugar because of the way the body processes it.

Just my experience and 2 cents.

Do I ever eat it? Yes....but only now and again. Maybe once a month.


GLUTEN FREE 4/4/08. LEGUME/SOY FREE 5/15/08. YEAST FREE. CORN FREE. GRAIN FREE. DAIRY FREE. I am eating all meats, eggs, veggies, fruits, squash, nuts and seeds. I just keep getting better every day. :)

Do not let any of the advice given here substitute for good medical care. Let this forum be a catalyst for research. Find support for any post in here before you believe it to be true. Arm yourself with knowledge. Let your doctor be your assistant. Listen to their advice, but follow your own instincts as well. Miracles are within your reach. You can heal!

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Have you ever heard or read of Dr. Oz who often appears on "Oprah"?

Dr. Oz says a lot of things that are very controversial. Research it, and what you can on your own. It sounds like a good sweetener, but may not be good for diabetics, as the others have said. I too, wonder about it since it is so high in fructose. I gave up high fructose corn syrup, just to get away from fructose.


Deb

Long Island, NY

Double DQ1, subtype 6

We urge all doctors to take time to listen to your patients.. don't "isolate" symptoms but look at the whole spectrum. If a patient tells you s/he feels as if s/he's falling apart and "nothing seems to be working properly", chances are s/he's right!

"The calm river of your life approaches the rocky chute of the rapids - flow on through. You are the same water. The rocks cannot hurt you. Remember, now and then, that you are the water and not the boat. Flow on!

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Well, if you want a healthy, all-natural sweetener, try Stevia. It has zero carbs, zero sugars, zero calories, and is zero on the glycemic index. Absolutely no negative side effects, and is extracted from the herb with water. There are no chemicals involved in processing. The one linked above is not bleached like other brands, and comes from Brazil, not China, as others do. They also have a free sample offer on the site, though I don't know which of their products they send in the samples. I recommend the pure powder, called Simply-Stevia. It may look expensive, until you realize it only takes a tiny amount to sweeten the food. Google can help you find a good price on it.

Tastes and opinions do vary, but I've found that about 1 tsp is as sweet as nearly a cup of sugar in many recipes. I find that moisture helps bring out the sweetness, so foods such as pudding or pie require less Stevia than foods such as cakes and cookies. It is very easy to use too much, so just ask if you'd like some measurements for a given recipe. It's easy once you know how to use it.

I read a bunch of stuff on agave nectar, and it looks like a lot of fructose to me.


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

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Well, if you want a healthy, all-natural sweetener, try Stevia. It has zero carbs, zero sugars, zero calories, and is zero on the glycemic index. Absolutely no negative side effects, and is extracted from the herb with water. There are no chemicals involved in processing. The one linked above is not bleached like other brands, and comes from Brazil, not China, as others do. They also have a free sample offer on the site, though I don't know which of their products they send in the samples. I recommend the pure powder, called Simply-Stevia. It may look expensive, until you realize it only takes a tiny amount to sweeten the food. Google can help you find a good price on it.

Tastes and opinions do vary, but I've found that about 1 tsp is as sweet as nearly a cup of sugar in many recipes. I find that moisture helps bring out the sweetness, so foods such as pudding or pie require less Stevia than foods such as cakes and cookies. It is very easy to use too much, so just ask if you'd like some measurements for a given recipe. It's easy once you know how to use it.

I read a bunch of stuff on agave nectar, and it looks like a lot of fructose to me.

Thanks for your info on Stevia. I have wanted to try it for a long time.

Questions...if you replaced 1 cup of sugar in a cookie recipe, how much Stevia would you use and how does using less sugar affect the other ingredients? Just wondering...Thanks!


Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden and I will give you rest. Matthew 11:28

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I have tried stevia, and I find it too bitter. I am not fond of it at all.

http://www.steviashop.com/additionaluses.php

According to this site, 2 cups of sugar is the same as 1 tsp of Stevia.


Deb

Long Island, NY

Double DQ1, subtype 6

We urge all doctors to take time to listen to your patients.. don't "isolate" symptoms but look at the whole spectrum. If a patient tells you s/he feels as if s/he's falling apart and "nothing seems to be working properly", chances are s/he's right!

"The calm river of your life approaches the rocky chute of the rapids - flow on through. You are the same water. The rocks cannot hurt you. Remember, now and then, that you are the water and not the boat. Flow on!

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Thanks for your info on Stevia. I have wanted to try it for a long time.

Questions...if you replaced 1 cup of sugar in a cookie recipe, how much Stevia would you use and how does using less sugar affect the other ingredients? Just wondering...Thanks!

Well, the exact amount will vary somewhat with personal preference. Since I don't have a sweet tooth, even with sugar I always used less - typically half the sugar called for in the recipe. But to replace one cup of sugar, I'd guess at least 1 teaspoon of Stevia, probably a little more, for the average person whom is accustomed to sugar. Personally, I generally use around 1 tsp per cup of dry ingredients when making cookies.

As for how the absence of sugar effects the other ingredients, it doesn't. However, the resulting texture will be different for things which normally depend on sugar as a textural component. Sugar is sticky, melts in the oven, and can add a crispiness to things like cookies. Cookies made only with Stevia as the sweetener do not melt and spread out in the oven. If the sugar recipe resulted in crispy cookies, replacing the sugar with Stevia might result in cookies which are noticeably less crispy.

Many brands of Stevia use fillers and other things such as Erythritol, to bulk up the product to make it measure and behave more like sugar. They also add those ingredients to help cover the aftertaste of their comparably low grade Stevia extract. The pure Stevia I recommended has nothing added, and so little is required that it doesn't contribute any textural qualities. It also has the highest purity available on the market, which means little or no aftertaste. Most brands can only claim 70% to 80% purity, but Simply-Stevia is over 95% pure. I do not find Simply-Stevia to have any aftertaste. The liquid Stevia products often have grapefruit seed extract as a preservative, but that causes an aftertaste, so the pure powder is a better choice.

I just checked the website I had linked to in my previous post, and they aren't offering free samples on the site anymore, but apparently you can get the free samples from a health store that carries the product.


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

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Well, the exact amount will vary somewhat with personal preference. Since I don't have a sweet tooth, even with sugar I always used less - typically half the sugar called for in the recipe. But to replace one cup of sugar, I'd guess at least 1 teaspoon of Stevia, probably a little more, for the average person whom is accustomed to sugar. Personally, I generally use around 1 tsp per cup of dry ingredients when making cookies.

As for how the absence of sugar effects the other ingredients, it doesn't. However, the resulting texture will be different for things which normally depend on sugar as a textural component. Sugar is sticky, melts in the oven, and can add a crispiness to things like cookies. Cookies made only with Stevia as the sweetener do not melt and spread out in the oven. If the sugar recipe resulted in crispy cookies, replacing the sugar with Stevia might result in cookies which are noticeably less crispy.

Many brands of Stevia use fillers and other things such as Erythritol, to bulk up the product to make it measure and behave more like sugar. They also add those ingredients to help cover the aftertaste of their comparably low grade Stevia extract. The pure Stevia I recommended has nothing added, and so little is required that it doesn't contribute any textural qualities. It also has the highest purity available on the market, which means little or no aftertaste. Most brands can only claim 70% to 80% purity, but Simply-Stevia is over 95% pure. I do not find Simply-Stevia to have any aftertaste. The liquid Stevia products often have grapefruit seed extract as a preservative, but that causes an aftertaste, so the pure powder is a better choice.

I just checked the website I had linked to in my previous post, and they aren't offering free samples on the site anymore, but apparently you can get the free samples from a health store that carries the product.

Thanks for the info!


Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden and I will give you rest. Matthew 11:28

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Fructose is fructose. It is *all* processed in the liver and it won't raise your blood sugar, that's why diabetics thought it was so great. But it has a host of other problem. It sounds like a bit of marketing hype that their fructose is somehow superior to other fructose. Agave also contains glucose, so that portion will raise blood sugar.

http://www.abc.net.au/rn/healthreport/stor...007/1969924.htm

I think Erythritol is a good sweetener, it comes from fruit and really won't raise your blood sugar. Here's a wikipedia article on it. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erythritol

The wikipedia article on Agave Syrup is interesting too: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agave_syrup

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"Agave syrup consists primarily of fructose and glucose. One source[3] gives 92% fructose and 8% glucose; another[4] gives 56% fructose and 20% glucose. These differences presumably reflect variation from one vendor of agave syrup to another."

There is some concern about the health effects of fructose, since Agave has a fructose content much higher than high-fructose corn syrup. Due to its fructose content, agave syrup is notable in that its glycemic index and glycemic load are apparently lower than most if not all other natural sweeteners on the market [5].

NancyM, this is a quote from the site you mentioned. I'm certainly not an expert on these things, but 2 doctors have told our daughter to use Agave instead of sugar and artificial sweetners. If you take the time to research what is being said about artificial sweeteners (including Splenda), you will be surprised at what the medical professionals are saying about them. Sometimes one just doesn't know what is good and what is not.

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Xylitol is another excellent natural sweetner. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xylitol

It is considered safe for diabetics and it appears to have other healthful side effects. It also has no after taste which I like. It is expensive, but you can use it cup for cup as a sugar replacement and you really do not notice the difference in flavor between it and sugar.

Keep in mind with Stevia that is is derived from a plant very closely related to ragweed. Anyone with a ragweed allergy should not use Stevia. Also be carefull when you first start to use Stevia and watch for an allergic reaction. Trust me, the reaction is a doozy.

Fructose is fructose. It is *all* processed in the liver and it won't raise your blood sugar, that's why diabetics thought it was so great. But it has a host of other problem. It sounds like a bit of marketing hype that their fructose is somehow superior to other fructose. Agave also contains glucose, so that portion will raise blood sugar.

http://www.abc.net.au/rn/healthreport/stor...007/1969924.htm

I think Erythritol is a good sweetener, it comes from fruit and really won't raise your blood sugar. Here's a wikipedia article on it. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erythritol

The wikipedia article on Agave Syrup is interesting too: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agave_syrup


"My mother always told me, it's okay to play with a man's mind

as long as you put it back where you got it when you're done with it."

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VioletBlue, Thanks for the info concerning Stevia being from a plant closely related to ragweed. Didn't know that. Some in our family do have ragweed allergy. Appreciate your warning! Haven't heard of Xylitol before, but will check it out. Jo Ann

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A little warning on the Xylitol.....you have to "build up" to it. Or you can get horrible gas and D. A little each day to build up and you will be fine.


GLUTEN FREE 4/4/08. LEGUME/SOY FREE 5/15/08. YEAST FREE. CORN FREE. GRAIN FREE. DAIRY FREE. I am eating all meats, eggs, veggies, fruits, squash, nuts and seeds. I just keep getting better every day. :)

Do not let any of the advice given here substitute for good medical care. Let this forum be a catalyst for research. Find support for any post in here before you believe it to be true. Arm yourself with knowledge. Let your doctor be your assistant. Listen to their advice, but follow your own instincts as well. Miracles are within your reach. You can heal!

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The following is info we found on Agave. Thought some might be interested in it.

Blue Agave Nectar

Agave Nectar :

Buy Blue Agave Nectar

Cook'n with Agave

Agave Nectar Manufacturer

Glycemic Index of Sugars

Agave Nectar Recipes

Glycemic Testing of Agave Nectar

Agave Nectar Press Release

FDA Labeling Laws

Wholesale Store Orders

The Dangers of Artificial Sugars

Not All Agaves Are Created Equal

Glycemic Value of Agave compared to other sugars:

SUGARS

Organic Agave Nectar 27

Fructose 32

Lactose 65

Honey 83

High fructose corn syrup 89 [Pers. corres. w/Prof. Brand Miller]

Sucrose 92

Glucose 137

Glucose tablets 146

Maltodextrin 150

Maltose 150

Glycemic Load of our Agave Nectar 1.6

Glycemic Index Definition- GLYCEMICINDEXDEFINED.pdf from www.glycemicindextesting.com

Glycemic Load Definition- GLYCEMICLOADDEFINED.pdf from www.glycemicindextesting.com

Glycemic Solutions has the highest rate of accuracy available, with specific in-real-time analytical testing methods specifically developed by Glycemic Solutions. The typical accuracy of GI testing has a variable of 80 percent. Glycemic Solutions accuracy has a variable of < 2 percent.

Agave Nectar Breaking News!

The Glycemic Research Institute in Washingtion DC ran extensive tests on our Agave Nectar for the past several months and have concluded that our Agave Nectar is safe for Diabetics! If you buy Agave Nectar without this seal, it may not be safe for Diabetics. Click here for the Full Report and check out the FDA Labeling Laws.

Up until a few years ago, health professionals believed that if a food was composed of complex carbohydrates (starches), it must break down into sugar more slowly in your body than food composed of simple carbohydrates (sugars). Through research, we have learned more about how foods affect blood glucose levels. When you eat a slice of bread, the flour from the bread breaks down into sugar (glucose) in your body to provide you with energy. The same thing happens when you eat a piece of fruit, drink a glass of milk or eat a chocolate bar. Each of these foods contain a different kind of sugar. Fructose is a sugar in fruit, lactose is found in milk and sucrose is found in the chocolate bar. All of these sugars are broken down during digestion and provide you with energy.The speed at which a food is able to increase a person's blood glucose levels is called the glycemic response. The glycemic response is influenced by many factors. Some factors may be the amount of food you eat, how the food is processed or the way the food is prepared. For example, pasta cooked 'al dente' (firm) is absorbed more slowly than pasta that is overcooked.The glycemic index

The ranking of different foods based on their glycemic response was first studied by Dr. David Jenkins and colleagues at St. Michael's Hospital (Toronto). The research team conducted several experiments looking at the speed at which different foods affect blood glucose levels and compared the numbers to a slice of white bread. White bread is given the glycemic index value of 100. Foods that have a value less than 100 are converted into sugar more slowly than white bread. Foods that have a glycemic index value greater than 100 turn into sugar more quickly than white bread.Other researchers have used glucose as the reference food, so glucose would have a value of 100. Today either glucose or white bread may be used as the reference food (if white bread = 100, then glucose = 140). Current values listed in this article should be divided by 1.4 to obtain the Glycemic Index(GI) of a food for which glucose = 100.What the researchers found surprised them. Foods such as milk and fruit tend to have a lower glycemic index value than common starchy foods such as bread, rice, potatoes and breakfast cereals. Even sugar (sucrose) had a glycemic index of 83, lower than some starchy foods. The good news is foods that were previously avoided by people with diabetes can now be added to their diet in moderation.

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Keep in mind that Agave is a very concentrated source of "fructose". So much more in a tsp of that than an apple. We arent designed to eat that much fructose in one sitting. The body always rebels against what is not natural. Always. The body is smart that way.

So like I said, eat sparingly. I eat it now and again in my Coconut Ice Cream from Turtle Mountain. But only like once a month.


GLUTEN FREE 4/4/08. LEGUME/SOY FREE 5/15/08. YEAST FREE. CORN FREE. GRAIN FREE. DAIRY FREE. I am eating all meats, eggs, veggies, fruits, squash, nuts and seeds. I just keep getting better every day. :)

Do not let any of the advice given here substitute for good medical care. Let this forum be a catalyst for research. Find support for any post in here before you believe it to be true. Arm yourself with knowledge. Let your doctor be your assistant. Listen to their advice, but follow your own instincts as well. Miracles are within your reach. You can heal!

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NancyM, this is a quote from the site you mentioned. I'm certainly not an expert on these things, but 2 doctors have told our daughter to use Agave instead of sugar and artificial sweetners. If you take the time to research what is being said about artificial sweeteners (including Splenda), you will be surprised at what the medical professionals are saying about them. Sometimes one just doesn't know what is good and what is not.

Unfortunately there's a lot of ignorance about the dangers of fructose out there. Some of this info is pretty new so it isn't going to filter down to doctors for another 10 years or so.

I have done a lot of research on the topic of sweeteners over the last 5 years. Unfortunately there's a lot of really bad information whose source is the sugar industry. They've done a lot of whisper campaigns over the years to discredit non-caloric sweeteners with things that are just out-and-out untrue. I wish I could remember the name of the sweetener they killed with a PR campaign, it's making a comeback now. I think it's Stevia, now some big agri companies are getting involved in marketing it so I'm sure we'll be hearing more whispering about it causing cancer or some such.

I've compiled a lot of info from several months into this thread about fructose.

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