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Celiac & Long Term Nexium Use

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Has anyone else been diagnosed as having celiac disease after being on Nexium or a another drug that suppresses stomach acid for a long period of time?

I am self diagnosed, and had been on Prilosec for many years. Now I no longer need it. I read a report once, don't remember where, in which a doctor stated that he felt everyone with reflux/GERD should be tested for celiac. That's not to say reflux causes celiac, but that reflux is a symptom of celiac.

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I was on Nexium for 7 years, then I changed my diet drastically to all whole wheat ceral, pasta and bread and that is when I got really sick and the nexium no longer helped. I do not need anything now and it has been almost 2 years. Jodie

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My story is the same. Used acid reducers for about three years until I was diagnosed. Was using stronger and stronger doses and still not always getting relief. Within several months of going gluten free I no longer needed acid reducers. The only time I have a problem now is if I'm accidentally glutened. I had other symptoms of active Celiacs for nearly ten years prior to diagnosis.

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My situation is a little different. I have been on Nexium for about 10 years because of GERD, I was diagnosed with celiac about 4 years ago and have gluten free since then. The reflux has not improved if anything it has become worse. I read an article about acid blockers causing an inability to digest gluten and I wondering if Nexium is what caused the problem in the first place. There are no studies for long term use of Nexium and I am becoming a bit concerned about the side effects of continually blocking stomach acid. After all it is there for a reason!!

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My situation is a little different. I have been on Nexium for about 10 years because of GERD, I was diagnosed with celiac about 4 years ago and have gluten free since then. The reflux has not improved if anything it has become worse. I read an article about acid blockers causing an inability to digest gluten and I wondering if Nexium is what caused the problem in the first place. There are no studies for long term use of Nexium and I am becoming a bit concerned about the side effects of continually blocking stomach acid. After all it is there for a reason!!

Sounds to me like your reflux may be due to another food intolerance and/or certain nutritional deficiencies. I would try cutting dairy and soy, and getting a sublingual methylcobalamin (B12) supplement. These are the two major culprits after gluten.

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My situation is a little different. I have been on Nexium for about 10 years because of GERD, I was diagnosed with celiac about 4 years ago and have gluten free since then. The reflux has not improved if anything it has become worse. I read an article about acid blockers causing an inability to digest gluten and I wondering if Nexium is what caused the problem in the first place. There are no studies for long term use of Nexium and I am becoming a bit concerned about the side effects of continually blocking stomach acid. After all it is there for a reason!!

This is why doctors so often fail their patients! If a person has acid reflux, unless a doctor does tests to prove you have excess acid, you most likely do not. As we age, and because of food issues, many people have REDUCED stomach acid. When this happens, you cannot digest your food properly and acid reflux results. It's undigested food that is going nowhere but rolling around your gut.

The fix, if there is still an on going problem after going gluten-free, is to take some Betaine HCL......which is hydrochloric acid....stomach acid. It's in pill form and should help with protein digestion. What people need is MORE acid to help digest that food, not something to suppress your gut acid.

G.I's tried to pull that one on me but I refused to take anything because I wanted to find out what the problem was. It took me 20 years because of their foolish advice!

Also, stomach acid is a natural defense against germs and bacteria, specifically pneumonia bacteria, and those with reduced acid have a tendency to have more problems with pneumonia and other illnesses affecting the lungs and gut. I guess that's why they push a pneumonia vaccine for older folks! :blink:

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The reflux has not improved if anything it has become worse.

This reminded me that after being gluten-free and then off of Prilosec, I did have a setback with the reflux.....once I cut out sugar I was fine.

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I also was on Nexium for about 2 years for stomach pain after eating, it improved some, and I then starting suffering with bloating, naseau and heartburn, which turned my doc thinking I had acid reflex and/or ulcer, so I was put on prevacid, it only got worse though.

Eventually I was dx with Celiac and as soon as I went gluten free I no longer needed any of the meds for heartburn and stomach issues.

This is a very interesting theory about Nexium, I wonder if It could be true

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I've also read things about most people not having enough stomach acid suggesting that some people need to take HCl to increase acid. The latest book I read (can't remember the name off the top, I can look it up if anyone wants the name) talked about carnivores having much more acidic stomachs in order to better digest meat. The author argued that humans were never originally designed to eat meat partly due to the lower stomach acid, but also because we really don't have carnivorous-type teeth. Not to take this thread too off-topic, but I'm wondering if most people need more acid because we tend to eat a lot of meat.

So Nexium is meant to decrease stomach acid to relieve symptoms of acid reflux and heartburn. This obviously doesn't get to the cause of the problem. If someone takes Nexium, do you think the reflux is still there, but is no longer uncomfortable because it's not acid coming up but just the food you eat?

I've never taken Nexium long term. I took it for a few weeks years ago when I only had mild celiac symptoms, but it made me feel much worse so I stopped taking it.

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I've also read things about most people not having enough stomach acid suggesting that some people need to take HCl to increase acid. The latest book I read (can't remember the name off the top, I can look it up if anyone wants the name) talked about carnivores having much more acidic stomachs in order to better digest meat. The author argued that humans were never originally designed to eat meat partly due to the lower stomach acid, but also because we really don't have carnivorous-type teeth. Not to take this thread too off-topic, but I'm wondering if most people need more acid because we tend to eat a lot of meat.

So Nexium is meant to decrease stomach acid to relieve symptoms of acid reflux and heartburn. This obviously doesn't get to the cause of the problem. If someone takes Nexium, do you think the reflux is still there, but is no longer uncomfortable because it's not acid coming up but just the food you eat?

I've never taken Nexium long term. I took it for a few weeks years ago when I only had mild celiac symptoms, but it made me feel much worse so I stopped taking it.

Many people do have enough stomach acid to digest proteins completely but for those with Celiac who also may have pancreatic insufficiency, along with the aging process, many have problems with acid reflux. I am not talking about old, old either.....most people after age 40 start to have a decrease in many things. It's all part of the aging process.

I think the worse culprit is the over processed, greasy, fast food stuff. People literally eat at McDonald's and other crappy food places on a regular basis. That stuff is very hard to digest and it isn't because of the proteins. It all boils down to a bad diet to start and then if you have any intolerances/allergies to boot, it will add to the problem. I am just blown away that the medical profession suppresses stomach acid with meds when it's a well known fact that stomach acid is reduced as we age. They put everyone on the stuff if they walk through the door with an acid reflux type of complaint. I can honestly say that there was not this problem to such a great degree when I was a kid. You didn't see large amounts of the population with acid reflux. Almost everyone I know is taking the stuff. Bizarre. It also makes me think how very many of these people have celiac disease/GS or some other food problem that is just not being looked into.

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Many people do have enough stomach acid to digest proteins completely but for those with Celiac who also may have pancreatic insufficiency, along with the aging process, many have problems with acid reflux. I am not talking about old, old either.....most people after age 40 start to have a decrease in many things. It's all part of the aging process.

I think the worse culprit is the over processed, greasy, fast food stuff. People literally eat at McDonald's and other crappy food places on a regular basis. That stuff is very hard to digest and it isn't because of the proteins. It all boils down to a bad diet to start and then if you have any intolerances/allergies to boot, it will add to the problem. I am just blown away that the medical profession suppresses stomach acid with meds when it's a well known fact that stomach acid is reduced as we age. They put everyone on the stuff if they walk through the door with an acid reflux type of complaint. I can honestly say that there was not this problem to such a great degree when I was a kid. You didn't see large amounts of the population with acid reflux. Almost everyone I know is taking the stuff. Bizarre. It also makes me think how very many of these people have celiac disease/GS or some other food problem that is just not being looked into.

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Sorry just tried to post a reply to a quote and I think I messed it up :-(

My diet was always very good, healthy (I never ate fast food!!) and of course now my diet is gluten free. The GERD caused damage to my esophagus and that was when they put me on the Nexium. I have a hiatal hernia which of course doesn't help. I had breast cancer anda mastectomy with reconstructive TRAM flap surgery in 2005 and have an inguinal and an abdominal hernia as a result of that surgery. I am sure none of these things help!!

Doctors are way to quick to treat the symptoms without addressing the cause but with the damage to the esophagus I wonder what else they could have done. I really want to get off the Nexium, they have tried weaning me off before but the acid reflux rebounds with a vengeance. Viscous cycle....

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Doctors are way to quick to treat the symptoms without addressing the cause but with the damage to the esophagus I wonder what else they could have done. I really want to get off the Nexium, they have tried weaning me off before but the acid reflux rebounds with a vengeance. Viscous cycle....

I wonder if there's anything more natural you can take to decrease the acid? Like you can get the HCl pills to increase acid - is there a basic yet more natural substance you could take instead?

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I wonder if there's anything more natural you can take to decrease the acid? Like you can get the HCl pills to increase acid - is there a basic yet more natural substance you could take instead?

I think you could certainly eat less acidic foods (I water down orange juice, for example--about 1 part oj to 4 parts water), as well as foods that might be able to absorb some acid, such as rice. Limiting fatty and sugary foods also helps.

Bananas, for some reason, used to give me severe reflux, and I still haven't figured that one out--what could possibly be blander than a banana?????

But what also helped significantly was to eat half as much, twice as often. In other words, 6 tiny meals per day instead of 3 squares. Exercise also helped, for some reason--maybe it strengthened muscles surrounding the esophageal opening????

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I wonder if there's anything more natural you can take to decrease the acid? Like you can get the HCl pills to increase acid - is there a basic yet more natural substance you could take instead?

Another side-effect of long term use of proton-pump inhibitors is anemia. A lot of people find that apple cider vinegar works wonders for reflux.

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Sorry just tried to post a reply to a quote and I think I messed it up :-(

My diet was always very good, healthy (I never ate fast food!!) and of course now my diet is gluten free. The GERD caused damage to my esophagus and that was when they put me on the Nexium. I have a hiatal hernia which of course doesn't help. I had breast cancer anda mastectomy with reconstructive TRAM flap surgery in 2005 and have an inguinal and an abdominal hernia as a result of that surgery. I am sure none of these things help!!

Doctors are way to quick to treat the symptoms without addressing the cause but with the damage to the esophagus I wonder what else they could have done. I really want to get off the Nexium, they have tried weaning me off before but the acid reflux rebounds with a vengeance. Viscous cycle....

My goodness, Lady, you have had more than your share of problems! I hope you are doing better and am so sorry you have had to suffer all of these health problems.

Hernia's are definitely a problem and probably a contributing factor to the reflux. However, the poster who wisely made the suggestion of using apple cider vinegar gave an alternative to what I was suggesting...increase stomach acid. Maybe you could give that a shot to see if it helps. I think at this point anything that will cause no harm should be given a try. I have no other suggestions, sorry, but can understand your desire to get off the Nexium.

Good luck to you and I hope you are feeling better soon!

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Thanks for all the advice and thoughts. I'm willing to try anything at this point. Apple cider vinegar sounds reasonable. Any ideas of dosage?

I have never had a reflux problem so am not sure about dosage. You may want to start off small, like a teaspoonful. I don't think I would take anymore than a tablespoonful....if that doesn't help, I don't think downing half a bottle of vinegar would help any better! I hope this works for you...I know how frustrating it is when you keep trying things and not have them work. Keep us posted if you do because I would be interested in hearing what the outcome is!

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Long term use of antacids hinders the absorption of B-12. Make sure you monitor your levels.

Thanks. The one advantage to having had breast cancer is that my oncologist does blood work every 4 months:-)

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I've also read things about most people not having enough stomach acid suggesting that some people need to take HCl to increase acid. The latest book I read (can't remember the name off the top, I can look it up if anyone wants the name) talked about carnivores having much more acidic stomachs in order to better digest meat. The author argued that humans were never originally designed to eat meat partly due to the lower stomach acid, but also because we really don't have carnivorous-type teeth. Not to take this thread too off-topic, but I'm wondering if most people need more acid because we tend to eat a lot of meat.

So Nexium is meant to decrease stomach acid to relieve symptoms of acid reflux and heartburn. This obviously doesn't get to the cause of the problem. If someone takes Nexium, do you think the reflux is still there, but is no longer uncomfortable because it's not acid coming up but just the food you eat?

I've never taken Nexium long term. I took it for a few weeks years ago when I only had mild celiac symptoms, but it made me feel much worse so I stopped taking it.

That's an interesting theory that teh author posed about humans not being meant to eat meat. The fact is that meat is a huge part of human evolution. We wouldn't be near as evolved as we are without it. Eating meat meant that hominids had to plan and work together in order to hunt. Eventually they learned to make weapons to kill their prey. All of this stimulated brain development enormously. Meat also contained the right nutrients to help the brains of the hominids develop and evolve. Aside from meat, eggs were the only other source of complete proteins, that is, containing all of the essential amino acids. All of this contributed to rapid evolution, which is why we are here today, as advanced as we are. We may not have carnivorous teeth, or iron stomachs, but we definitely evolved to be able to eat meat. Just my 2 cents.

-Brian

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I had severe gastric reflux for about 2 years before I started to take Nexium.  The only time the reflux stopped was when I did a fruit detox.  Little did I know at the time, the reason for the temporary relief was that I had stopped consuming wheat during the detox.  I just hadn't made the gluten connection back then.   Eventually my doctor recommended I start taking Nexium, so I eventually built up to 20mg a day which certainly kept the pain away, but my health declined quickly.  My hair went grey really fast!

 

I did some research on Nexium and found out how detrimental it is to the human digestive system, so I began to look for alternatives.  That's when I discovered the connection between gluten intolerance and GERD.

 

When I went gluten-free within days I no longer needed Nexium ... and I still don't.  I want to point out though that I am pain-free because I have specific rules about what foods I put in my mouth.  Everything is measured and natural - for me this is the only way to optimal health.

 

 

The grey hairs are starting to me replaced with brown strands, which tells me my body is getting the needed nutrients again!

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