Jump to content
  • Join Our Community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

happygirl

Celiac Disease Vs. Gluten Sensitivity

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

I think there's alot of truth in this.

Personally, I feel very strongly that Celiac and gluten sensitivity are two seperate conditions.

I think this would explain why so many do not test positive for Celiac...even though symptoms may seem similar and even though there is a positive response to the diet.

I think we (those who do not have Celiac) could continue to suffer symptoms while consuming gluten....without EVER having a positive biopsy or bloodwork for Celiac (regardless of how sick we may become). If the autoimmune response is not occuring...then its not Celiac Disease.

There has to be a genetic predispositon as well as a trigger.

I think many people can develop a "gluten sensitivity"....but without having the genetic predisposition its very unlikely to ever "turn into" Celiac.

Even if the treatment is the same....one involves an autoimmune attack....and the other does not.

I dont believe that all of the various genes found in people with gluten sensitivity can be associated with Celiac....especially in the absence of positive test results.

I agree 100% with Dr. Fasano on this topic of Celiac vs. Gluten Sensitivity. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I still wonder about the whole auto-immune thing though. I don't have Celiac. But I do have psoriasis and thyroid issues - both things that are associated with Celiac. I also have (had?) an auto-immune kidney problem which totally went into remission when I went fanatically gluten-free. (This was NOT a coincidence.) So, if non-Celiac gluten intolerance doesn't involve an auto-immune reaction in the intestinal tract, couldn't it cause an auto-immune reaction somewhere else in the body?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, this just confirms what I have already concluded about my own conclusion. Having had gluten-response symptoms for 40 years, if I did have Celiac, I would have expected more damage to have been done and to have been sicker. Eliminating gluten eliminated the symptoms and my gluten-response symptoms (when accidentally CC'd) have progressively gotten less and less severe.

...So, if non-Celiac gluten intolerance doesn't involve an auto-immune reaction in the intestinal tract, couldn't it cause an auto-immune reaction somewhere else in the body?

I wonder that, too. I have low thyroid that has not, however, excalated into anything else, and is slowly getting better. Although diabetes is in my family, I have not developed it and I'm 60 now, with only 4 years of gluten-lite and 2 years of gluten-free. And with 40 years of being gluten-sensitive, I would have thought that more would have happened to me. (I'm not complaining!)

Mind you, I have not had an official diagnosis for anything related to gluten, BUT, I did have symptoms of Sjogren's Syndrome (dry eyes and skin), which did significantly improve after going gluten-free; and my current doctor did agree that what I described was probably Sjogren's.

I'm really encouraged that there has been this level of activity in the medical community to try to understand gluten intolerance and Celiac. The more this kind of research and published reports are brought to the attention of the practicing physicians, the more these doctors are going to suspect gluten to be the root cause of all these "unexplained" symptoms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm really encouraged that there has been this level of activity in the medical community to try to understand gluten intolerance and Celiac. The more this kind of research and published reports are brought to the attention of the practicing physicians, the more these doctors are going to suspect gluten to be the root cause of all these "unexplained" symptoms.

I do think its encouraging that there is some interest in learning more about the differences between Celiac and Gluten Sensitivity. I hope this is something that they will continue to research.

I'm not convinced at this point that gluten is the "root" cause in most cases of gluten sensitivity. I think its often a symptom of other issues that are going on. It could be as simple as an enzyme deficiency....or it can be complicated with several different things contributing (as seen in Autism and other chronic conditions).

I do think that it can only benefit people if the doctors know more about this and are recommending the diet for those patients who have unexplained symptoms. Although I'm not sure if that would happen without having some way to "identify" gluten sensitivity with testing.

The medical community is largely focused on "disease".....and pharmaceutical treatments. Even if non celiac gluten intolerance gets some kind of acknowledgement from certain doctors (like Dr. Fasano)....unfortunately, I think we're still a long way away from having the doctors recommending this diet instead of the medications for IBS and other nonspecific conditions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So now we have "celiac disease", "gluten sensitivity", "gluten intolerance", "latent celiac disease", "refactory sprue" . . . Someone needs to

develop a dictionary for us to keep track of the terminology. It was much easier when we all just had celiac disease.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i got so ill i almost died as a teenager, and i still get physically clear siring pain in my abdomen whenever i have gluten. despite going off gluten before getting tested, there is no doubt in my mind i have celiac disease.

while i refuse to get a biopsy, i am so physically sensitive that i can tell my intestines are pretty messed up after only 10 years of noticeable gluten-reaction. i am basically intolerant (to varying degrees) to all possible irritating foods, from teas to onion to plain rice. i almost cant eat without upsetting my stomach at least a little, and its been 6 months of gluten-free, but its getting better. at first i tried to avoid all irritants.. now im adding a few back and forcing myself to just deal with the reaction for the sake of a healthy diet. no one can live on fruit, burgers, and salad, alone.

my immune system has always been so screwed up in so many ways. i dont get every illness, just tonsillitis, sinus infection, ear infection, and every cold and flue that goes around - sounds like IgA deficiency. i also have other confirmed food allergies.

---

i was always surprised when i read about "gluten sensitivity" and tried to fallow the diets.. only to find they weren't strict enough, and that my symptoms seemed magnified. this explains alot, i didnt know they were two different conditions!

---

i wonder, if its related to the immune system - so, sensitives get dramatically less physical damage than celiacs?

typically, do celiacs have a milk allergy, and sensitives just have an intolerance?

are you more likely to have immediate relatives with your issues if its Celiac than Sensitive?

do only allergic people get the physical pain?

do only celiacs, or both groups get diabetic symptoms that vanish upon going gluten-free?

do most/all celiacs have a wheat allergy? (before hearing about celiac, i believed i was allergic to wheat, i never considered i may have been right!)

also - i have a serious thing for coffee. whenever my stomach is upset, i crave coffee.. usually coffee causes the upset, but in celiac, could it be helping somehow? like moving the digestive process along faster? if so do sensitives ever crave coffee too for this reason?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
or could it be that the tests aren't perfect and that you can have celiac disease and still test negative for the illness?

My betting money would be on this. I tested negative by blood test but have the symptoms of Coeliac including long term symptoms of infertility, and teeth enamel defects. Recently the DQ2 gene was found. I have 3 or 4 other autoimmune diseases....

Was my first Coeliac blood test a false negative. I think so and so does my Dr.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
or could it be that the tests aren't perfect and that you can have celiac disease and still test negative for the illness?

This was definately the case for me. There is no doubt that I have celiac disease with multiple autoimmune mediated disorders going into remission on the gluten free diet. My not showing up on the blood tests delayed my diagnosis by many painfilled years. The TTg was not in use yet so I might have been positive on that one but there is no way I would do a gluten challenge to find out. I do carry 2 copies of an 'unusual' celiac gene, at least in the US population so perhaps that had something to do with it. My doctors have not waffled at all about the diagnosis even with negative bloods. My children did show up on bloodwork and one with a biopsy. The doctors stated that they were celiac. Some here might disagree and my children might be classified now as gluten intolerant because the autoimmune issues have not shown however there is no doubt in my mind that if they continue eating gluten that they also will someday be classified as celiac.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I still wonder about the whole auto-immune thing though. I don't have Celiac. But I do have psoriasis and thyroid issues - both things that are associated with Celiac. I also have (had?) an auto-immune kidney problem which totally went into remission when I went fanatically gluten-free. (This was NOT a coincidence.) So, if non-Celiac gluten intolerance doesn't involve an auto-immune reaction in the intestinal tract, couldn't it cause an auto-immune reaction somewhere else in the body?

Yes it can. You are right that it was not a coincidence that those autoimmune issues resolved gluten free. It is the autoimmune attack that really classifies us as celiac. Folks that are simply gluten sensitive with no autoimmune features may share symptoms but those will be primarily gut related or related to vitamin and mineral deficits. As stated in the article it is the autoimmune aspect of the disease that really makes the difference in classification. Will folks that have only gluten intolerance eventually develop 'true' celiac? The ones who have autoimmune impact will the ones who don't won't. The autoimmune impact can attack any organ of the body.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is easy to confuse clustering effects with causal effects.

For example, if you have a compromised (less than perfect) immune system you could have one or more of the auto-immune systems, for example diabetes and celiac. Neither disease caused the other, both were caused by the compromised immune system. That would be clustering effects.

On the other hand, if you have celiac and your body attacks itself in a manner to affect production of insulin resulting in diabetes, you would have a causal effect.

As the original post stated, none of this matters in terms of deciding what to eat. It does matter in terms of understanding what is going on and developing ways to prevent, treat or just watch out for these other things.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About the only thing that concluding that I'm "intolerant" rather than "celiac" is a bit of peace of mind that if I haven't developed autoimmune diseases by this time after 40 years undiagnosed, I probably won't ever. And a lessening of the fear of developing intestinal cancers.

Other than that, my life is the same as any celiac's. Centered around food and avoiding gluten and food allergens. And the constant striving to improve my immune system which, if anything was damaged by 40 years of gluten, that is it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I dont think that any tests are perfect 100% of the time. Some people will test negative for different reasons (biopsies missed damage, not enough samples taken, IgA definciency, etc.) and yet still have Celiac Disease.

However, I think that the majority of people testing negative.....test negative because they truelly do not have Celiac Disease.

Celiac is an autoimmune disease....this is what the tests are looking for. If you do not have the autoimmune reaction ....then its just not ever gonna show up in a test that is specific for Celiac Disease.

A person might be extremely sensitive to gluten....and feel tons better without it.....but personally, I dont feel that the tests are to blame for so many people coming back negative for Celiac Disease.

Gluten sensitivity appears to be very prevelant....and more and more people are experiencing the symptoms and yet NOT testing positive for Celiac (the autoimmune reaction).

If someone has impaired enzyme function and cannot properly digest gluten this alone can result in plenty of damage (that is not autoimmune) which can then lead to a leaky gut and all sorts of additional problems....including autoimmune diseases.

Autoimmune disease is associated with Leaky Gut.....so *anyone* having damage to the gut which allows for undigested food, toxins and pathogens to enter the bloodstream...may be more susceptible to developing clusters of autoimmune conditions.

I was diagnosed with both Graves Disease and gluten intolerance. I do not have the genes for Celiac.....nor did I test positive in bloodwork or biopsy. I dont have it (I'm very certain of this)...but nevertheless.....I developed an autoimmune disease (and all sorts of food intolerances).

If gluten is not getting broken down and is causing damage to the gut (inflammation)....removing it can certainly help with healing....and it can calm down the immune system. If Leaky Gut is allowing antigens to pass into the bloodstream *anything* which helps to heal the gut will in turn help the immune system. Alot of things will calm down when the immune system isnt having to deal with gluten and all sorts of other antigens entering the bloodstream.

So yes, non-celiac gluten sensitivity can lead to autoimmune problems.

Having various autoimmune diseases doesnt define Celiac....having an autoimmune reaction in the gut (that is occuring when gluten is consumed) is what defines Celiac Disease. If you dont have that going on....then the tests will not come back positive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As the original post stated, none of this matters in terms of deciding what to eat. It does matter in terms of understanding what is going on and developing ways to prevent, treat or just watch out for these other things.

I agree with this all of this.

It doesnt matter with regards to gluten because anyone who is sensitive should be avoiding it....regardless of whether or not they test positive for Celiac. However, since "gluten sensitivity" is a different condition....there may be other factors (besides gluten) playing a role.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, this is all making my head spin a bit, and I don't have a strong opinion one way or another. But I seem to recall reading lots of testimonies from people who tested negative for celiac at one point, then tested positive later. That's what really makes me wonder...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i was always surprised when i read about "gluten sensitivity" and tried to fallow the diets.. only to find they weren't strict enough, and that my symptoms seemed magnified. this explains alot, i didnt know they were two different conditions!

The gluten free diet is the same for both conditions...they are both equally strict. No gluten.

i wonder, if its related to the immune system - so, sensitives get dramatically less physical damage than celiacs?

I wouldnt say that damage is less. Damage can still be severe....although, the autoimmune attack to the intestines would not be occuring as it does in Celiac. Anything that puts alot of stress on the immune system can ultimately cause alot of harm to the body.

typically, do celiacs have a milk allergy, and sensitives just have an intolerance?

Celias have an intolerance to gluten....and in the beginning stages of the diet (while villi are still damaged and healing) many Celiacs have lactose intolerance. A milk allergy is a totally seperate thing....anyone can be allergic to milk....its not specific to Celiac or gluten sensitivity.

are you more likely to have immediate relatives with your issues if its Celiac than Sensitive?

Celiacs are more likely to have relatives who also have Celiac Disease. There hasnt been enough research on gluten sensitivity to say whether or not this would also be the case for the non-celiac gluten sensitive individuals. Since genetics probably plays a role (to some extent) I would assume that its likely.

do only allergic people get the physical pain?

Neither Celiac Disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity are "allergies". They are not allergic reactions in either case. But yes, both conditions can cause physical pain.

do only celiacs, or both groups get diabetic symptoms that vanish upon going gluten-free?

I think they would have to do studies on this to answer that question. I would guess that both groups can experience a resolution of symptoms for various conditions.

do most/all celiacs have a wheat allergy? (before hearing about celiac, i believed i was allergic to wheat, i never considered i may have been right!)

Celiac is not a wheat allergy. A wheat allergy is a seperate condition. Its possible to have both though.

also - i have a serious thing for coffee. whenever my stomach is upset, i crave coffee.. usually coffee causes the upset, but in celiac, could it be helping somehow? like moving the digestive process along faster? if so do sensitives ever crave coffee too for this reason?

I'm not sure about this. I've never been a coffee drinker. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Okay, this is all making my head spin a bit, and I don't have a strong opinion one way or another. But I seem to recall reading lots of testimonies from people who tested negative for celiac at one point, then tested positive later. That's what really makes me wonder...

I think gene testing can be helpful since approx. 97% of diagnosed Celiacs carry either DQ2 or DQ8. There's a very small percentage who test positive for Celiac without having either of these genes though. However, its less likely to be Celiac without having either of the main genes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Okay, this is all making my head spin a bit, and I don't have a strong opinion one way or another. But I seem to recall reading lots of testimonies from people who tested negative for celiac at one point, then tested positive later. That's what really makes me wonder...

The lab report from my Coeliac blood tests said "up to 10% of coeliac patients may have negative serology testing. Suggest further investigation only if there is a high clinical suspicion of coeliac disease."

Sadly my Dr didn't read this at the time and just made me start the gluten-free diet...... In hindsight it would have been a good idea to have a biopsy done despite the negative blood test.....but hindsight is 20/20 :lol:

For example, if you have a compromised (less than perfect) immune system you could have one or more of the auto-immune systems, for example diabetes and celiac. Neither disease caused the other, both were caused by the compromised immune system. That would be clustering effects.

On the other hand, if you have celiac and your body attacks itself in a manner to affect production of insulin resulting in diabetes, you would have a causal effect.

Its the proverbial chicken and egg story. What causes the clustering of autoimmune diseases...Bad luck ? Weakened immune system ? By what ? If the tests for Coeliac can be less than 100% accurate - it would be wrong to assume a negative test is an accurate result if symptoms, clustering of other autoimmune diseases, and family history suggest otherwise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The lab report from my Coeliac blood tests said "up to 10% of coeliac patients may have negative serology testing. Suggest further investigation only if there is a high clinical suspicion of coeliac disease."

Sadly my Dr didn't read this at the time and just made me start the gluten-free diet...... In hindsight it would have been a good idea to have a biopsy done despite the negative blood test.....but hindsight is 20/20 :lol:

I'm assuming they are referring to IgA deficiency....which can result in negative serology in people who have Celiac Disease. This is why the total serum IgA is included in the Celiac panel. Did you have this test?

The prevalence of celiac disease in patients with selective IgA deficiency ranges from 10% to 30%, depending on the evaluated population. This association between celiac disease and IgA deficiency complicates serological testing for celiac disease.

Most laboratories offer IgA- based assays only to accomplish serological testing for celiac disease and monitor response . If IgA deficiency is not excluded, the physician may not recognize a false-negative celiac serological test result attributable to IgA deficiency. Thus, patients with IgA deficiency and celiac disease will remain undetected by the conventional IgA-based serological tests unless IgA concentrations are simultaneously assessed.

http://www.redorbit.com/news/health/151655...ches/index.html

The total serum IgA is an important test and should not be left out when being tested for Celiac Disease.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It is the autoimmune attack that really classifies us as celiac. Folks that are simply gluten sensitive with no autoimmune features may share symptoms but those will be primarily gut related or related to vitamin and mineral deficits. As stated in the article it is the autoimmune aspect of the disease that really makes the difference in classification. Will folks that have only gluten intolerance eventually develop 'true' celiac? The ones who have autoimmune impact will the ones who don't won't. The autoimmune impact can attack any organ of the body.

This brings the number of wheat-induced autoimmune manifestations to three:

1. Celiac disease ......the intestinal immune system attacking the intestinal lining.

2. Gluten intolerance .......an autoimmune attack against organs in the circulatory system resulting from the intestine "zonulin dumping" its contents into the circulatory system in the presence of gluten.

3. Gluten sensitivity ......a gluten or other opioid antigen attack which results from the intestine "zonulin dumping" its contents into the circulatory system in the presence of gluten. Besides the zonulin dumping, there is no immune response. Prime examples would include type 2 diabetes and high cholesterol.

Any given person may display any single manifestation, or any combination of manifestations.

..

Edited by veggienft

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm assuming they are referring to IgA deficiency....which can result in negative serology in people who have Celiac Disease. This is why the total serum IgA is included in the Celiac panel. Did you have this test?

Yes... My Total IgA was 1.44 g/L and this lab says <4.00 is normal. But I was eating Gluten light at the time as well... I am almost certain my villi are/were damaged due to the subsequent dairy / lactose problem. That is now healing to a certain degree...

As the testing improves there are articles like this coming through. I found this interesting ...that people with positive blood tests can have a normal biopsy ...but which now with better techniques of testing ....may have the pre mucosal changes evident...

Recently, doctors have begun to embrace the idea that some patients with positive celiac blood tests may have mucosal lesions that are too small to appear on routine histopathological analysis.

http://www.celiac.com/articles/21646/1/Hig...ccur/Page1.html

So where does this leave people that may have had a false negative blood test and a negative biopsy ( using basic testing and assuming that their Dr even DID a biopsy... ). Are they undiagnosed Coeliac or only Gluten Intolerant....cc and crumbs and "this bit won't hurt me" allowed ... ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes... My Total IgA was 1.44 g/L and this lab says <4.00 is normal. But I was eating Gluten light at the time as well...

The total serum IgA is a different test than the antigliadin IgA.

The total serum IgA is a test to check that you are producing normal amounts of IgA. If someone is IgA deficient the Celiac tests (which are checking for IgA antibodies) are not going to be reliable...and IgG antibodies need to be checked instead.

Eating gluten light shouldnt affect the results of the total serum IgA...this is not a test for Celiac Disease....but a test to make sure that the Celiac tests will not result in false negatives due to IgA deficiency.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for explaining that. The labwork looked as clear as mud :D IgA and IgG Antibodies were also tested. And the disclaimer was for all tests.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is my theory. I think that celiac disease is actually a family of diseases all of which include gluten intolerance. The fact that different genes are responsible for it is consistent with that. Different forms of the disease have difference levels of tolerance to gluten, different symptoms, and differences in test results. I don't think that there are just two forms. I think there are many. It seems inaccurate to say that you don't have celiac if you test negative since so many people have negative tests followed by positive ones. This in

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Top Posters +

  • Upcoming Events

    • May 29, 2019 04:00 PM Until 08:00 AM
      0  
       
       
       
      Celiac Emotional Healing Support Group
       
       
       
      Again you are invited to join Johnny Patout, LCSW for Baton Rouge's first emotional healing support group meeting to assist those living with celiac disease manage the emotional challenges so many of us face. Most often the emotional disturbances include depression, disinterest in normal activities, insomnia, grief, mood changes, anxiety, inability to concentrate, extreme concern about managing a gluten-free lifestyle and other emotional and behavioral challenges.
       
      The professionals at Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center created the emotional healing support group to give us a safe place to begin to process our emotions and support each other as we heal emotionally while managing celiac disease and the resulting autoimmune disorders.
       
      The emotional healing support group meets every Thursday, 6:00-7:00pm, at the Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center of Baton Rouge. Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center is located at 4637 Jamestown Avenue, Baton Rouge, Suite B-1. Suite B-1 is upstairs.
       
      The support group is free and open everyone managing celiac disease. For more information: emotionalhealingforceliacs@hotmail.com
    • June 01, 2019 Until June 02, 2019
      0  
      Nourished Festival is a family-friendly event with 10 locations across the US. Attendees will be able to sample food, health and beauty products, meet with companies, learn about the most current food lifestyles, receive coupons and attend educational sessions with industry experts. 
      Nourished Festival, managed by The Nourished Group and presented by Enjoy Life Foods, is the largest gluten-free, allergy-friendly and specialty diet event in the US, with 10 locations including.
      ABOUT THE NOURISHED FESTIVALS
      Managed by The Nourished Group, formerly The Gluten Free Media Group, The Nourished Festivals are the largest and fastest growing special diet consumer events in the United States. Started in 2007, the events have expanded from one to ten cities throughout the country. The festivals cater to anyone looking to lead a healthier lifestyle or those who follow a specialty diet due to autoimmune conditions, food sensitivities, allergies or intolerances. Offerings including Paleo, Keto, Plant-Based, Gluten-Free, Allergen-Friendly and Nut-Free products. The events provide the opportunity for attendees to sample and purchase new products, receive coupons, meet with brand ambassadors and attend educational classes with industry experts. For more information, visit http://www.nourishedfestival.com 
       
    • July 07, 2019 Until August 03, 2019
      0  
      For more information, visit www.kefss.com or call (407) 255-6550. info@kefss.com 

      KEF USA Summer Camps Announces the New KEF Gluten-Free Camp in Orlando, Florida for Youths with Celiac Disease.

      [Orlando, FL February 6, 2019]-KEF USA is excited to announce that we will offer a new 100% gluten-free camp program to give kids and teens with Celiac Disease a safe, exciting and healthy summer. KEF USA programs offer fun and unique experiences that can only be found in Orlando, Florida. Campers explore the theme parks and local attractions, make new friends, discover new interests and create memories that last a lifetime.


  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      87,370
    • Most Online
      4,125

    Newest Member
    Maria 1952
    Joined
  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      112,549
    • Total Posts
      958,066
  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Forum Discussions

    Thank you for all of the suggestions and information.  I will see a lot of the symptoms that I have that I didn't mention listed caused by lack of certain enzymes.  I have blood tests every 3 months. That is when I noticed my cholesterol, etc. not in check.  I eat too many carbohydrates because it causes less diarrhea than a lot of vegetables.  But in talking to 3 of my sisters they are already on medication for the problem.   One has Celiacs the other has Sjorgrens which I also have.  I'm conce
    For the fog and memory, it can be many things, the brain requires certain ratios and amounts of fat to function, it also requires b-vitamins the full spectrum among other amino acids, minerals and vitamins, nerve functions require magnesium, potassium and other things to fire right.  Celiac can hamper the ability to break down and absorb nutrients, digestive issues and enzymes can further complicate this, and trying to eat the right ratios of foods. I supplement with Liquid Health Mega B-compl
    I am interested in your comments about losing your memory.  I have Celiacs and IBS, etc.   Very difficult to eat a healthy diet.  One goes against the other.  The past year I have noticed a marked difference in my memory and was very concerned about it because my mother had Alzheimer's.  I had a brain scan but that is not the problem at least it doesn't show up on the MRI.  All of my blood enzymes are way out of line for my size and I'm thinking it's the diet and inability to do extensive exerci
  • Blog Entries

×
×
  • Create New...