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SeMeCl

Falling Into Temptation.

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Hello everyone.

I am not new the whole celiac thing, I have been diagnosed for longer than I'd like to admit for what I'm about to say.

I try to follow the diet, be good, but always fall into temptation. I don't know if anyone else has experienced the same thing and has suggestions for me. I have heard people say that they don't want to get sick, nor do I, but my reactions aren't so strong it stops me. I have also had people say they fear cancer, I believe this as valid, but still it is not a deterrent. Don't get me wrong, I appreciate my health and want a long life, but when I default I do not think of the future.

I was diagnosed when I was 15 years-old. I wasn't good at first, but this had more to do with a doctor that told me that I was only mildly gluten intolerant and could eat some gluten. With more research during a year I found out that this was misinformation. I have periods when I am good and then I see something or smell something delicious I resist, but at times I give in. I feel denied. I do have little support from family and friends, it is not as though they shove the food in my face, but at the same time they have done little to understand this. They don't understand what this means in my life.

How do I get past temptation? I miss the foods that I could eat. I find that I indulge on other, not healthy things to fill my non-gluten void, NOT GOOD TOO MUCH WEIGHT GAIN!!!!

If you have experienced this and have suggestions please let me know.

(I am also in a different country where they LOVE bread right now and gluten-free items are limited.)

Thank you all so much.

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If getting sick or developing cancer are not enough....I just dont know what to say. It has to come from deep within yourself. You have to wan it. You have to love yourself enough to stay away from gluten. For some people it takes a major medical crisis for them to adhere to a healthy lifestyle. My Sis is a good example. She smoked since she was 13 and just Feb. at the age of 43 she got dx cancer. Now she knew that smoking could cause cancer of course, but she didnt think bout the future...until the cancer. She quit cold turkey on March 1st and hasnt lit up since. Maybe you are one of these types of folks. Me....I think of the future and take care of myself now. Not saying either way is superior....since I dont understand people that dont...it may just be a personality thing. I hope you can find that reserve now!

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I don't find the thought of cancer scary, it isn't that big of a risk.

I'd be more concerned about causing permanent nerve damage and spending the rest of my life in a wheel chair, or causing so much damage that my gut could never heal and I'd spend my life hooked up to an IV, or destroying my joints that I spend my life in pain, or some other lifelong damage.

There are far worse things than dying.

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Perhaps I didn't make my question clear. I'm not talking about not caring about getting sick or not "loving myself." I'm not here for my character to be attacked. I just don't see scare tactics as motivation. I just want to get another point of view on what people's motivation is and I don't believe everyone stays away from gluten out of fear.

Perhaps someone will understand my situation. I live in a house where everything is gluten filled. I have a small spot in the freezer for my flours and a little bit of cabinet space for cereal and occasionally cookies or another treat. I cannot be the only person that is the only celiac in the house and confined to such a small amount of product. It's hard to stay away from the gluten filled stuff when that's all there is and you're the only celiac in the house. Does someone understand this and have useful, non-judgmental suggestions?

Thank you.

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Hey I am sorry if I came across judgmental. It was not intentional. I guess I wasnt clear on what you were asking. For me it isnt exactly fear that motivates me to stay on track. I get really sick: vertigo and migraines. The vertigo is my worst symptom and I cannot think of any food I would eat to risk that. When it happens I cannot walk and I want to puke. It is horrible.

Human beings are motivated by two things (positive) and (negative) reinforcement. So if none of the negative motivation works for you, maybe you can try focusing on the positive. What are the benefits eating gluten free has given you? And keep your eye on those. You could also think of every time you resist as a little victory. A way you have made yourself stronger. And you can be proud of that. :)

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It took me approx. 16 years to get diagnosed. Even after that, I would cheat here and there, depending on how much I wanted whatever it was. Finally, one summer about 7 years ago after being sick for nine days straight, I said, "THAT"S ENOUGH!" :( It took that nine days of big D and other ailments to finally convince me that it was the only way. I made up my mind, then and there, and haven't cheated since. My health has improved greatly!

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when i first found out i had to stop eating gluten, i had that sort of feeling. "oh i really want a sub sandwhich i always eat them" "oh i love hemp bread i really want it"

but i handled it without breaking even once, because years before i had struggled with "no dairy"

as a baby i spitup any milk. as a little child, dilly bars from dairyqueen gave me diareah but i ate them anyway, regular milk always gave me a stomach ache. as i got older i simply ignored the allergy part, and avoided my growing lactose intollerance by cutting back on the more lactosy foods, then by taking lactaid enzyme pills.

i always knew i was not supposed to have dairy, but it was around and all my friends at it, even my parents and doctor pushed milk on me because i was so small (unknowingly from celiac) that they thought "calcium"

when i was 15, i became extremly sick. i reformed my diet to be excessively healthy just so i could survive the ordeal and i suspect also narrowly avoid physcially obvious malnourishment, and having to behave strict and healthy helped me drop dairy.

my whole mindset changed : dairy was not a yummy food everyone ate and i wanted too.. it was something that tasted nice briefly, then harmed me. i felt like it wasnt food anymore at all. i saw milk the way i saw paper when kids in school would eat it for fun : i dont want to imitate that idiotic act. paper isnt food!

to people like us, gluten isnt food either. its the enemy. it looks liek food, and it smells like food, but adding icing to paste doesnt make it food.

i dont know if it will help, but it works perfectly for me. when i see gluten i just think to myself - dont be fooled, that isnt food its like metal or dirt! it may help to remind yourself that gluten and dairy are technically NOT made for human digestion to begin with.

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I think it's a mindset, and only you can make it happen. I have been gluten-free now for over 8 yrs, and from the minute I decided to go gluten-free, I never cheated. I was so sick, for so long, I just wanted my life back, and if not eating gluten was going to give it back to me, then I made my mind up--NO MORE GLUTEN!!! At that time, I still had gluten in the house because I still had kids living at home. My food was labeled, they understood, they could use it carefully...new knife every time they used my jar of peanut butter, margarine, or mayonaise. Everything I ate had MOM on it, one son used to tease and say, "This must really be good, it says WOW!"

Shay was correct in her first post...only you can change your habits. No one else can do it for you. You can live in a house divided, if you need too, it isn't easy, yet you can do it!

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to people like us, gluten isnt food either. its the enemy. it looks liek food, and it smells like food, but adding icing to paste doesnt make it food.

i dont know if it will help, but it works perfectly for me. when i see gluten i just think to myself - dont be fooled, that isnt food its like metal or dirt! it may help to remind yourself that gluten and dairy are technically NOT made for human digestion to begin with.

This is more or less the trick I use as well. I see gluten stuff as something that looks nice and smells nice, but that isn't meant for consumption. Just like I don't go around eating roses either. :D

I think you could probably train yourself to think this way, if you start to tell yourself every time you see gluten food "that isn't food" it should start to stick after a while I think? That might help when you have to be surrounded by gluteny things (note I didn't say foods!). B)

What I also do is I try to focus on tasty food that is naturally gluten free, like veggies and fruit and meat, not so much the gluten free bread or cookies. I can really enjoy a yummy chicken stir fry...

And last but not least, if you feel like you need to vent to people who know what you're going through, do it here! Sure you will also get responses that you might not agree with, but I find that to also be a strength of a forum like this, because sometimes there's a point of view that I wouldn't have thought of otherwise. But there are people here who know what the impact of celiac is on your life, much more than the not-celiac people in your life are able to.

Hope this helps a little...

Pauliina

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semecl,

I don't have many ideas, but wanted to offer you some support. Hang in there. Don't beat yourself up over this - people who have less severe reactions, less access to gluten free foods, family and friends who don't completely understand, and incomplete information from their medical professionals are often the ones who have a tougher time with the diet. Its certainly not just you.

http://www.celiac.com/articles/21502/1/Low...oods/Page1.html

http://www.celiac.com/articles/21484/1/Stu...Diet/Page1.html

Are there substitutions (products to ship, or recipes) for 'normal' foods that we can help with? Maybe we can help with substitutions so that you feel less alone in your house. There are many members on this board who have recipes and tricks to make foods that are 'normal' - and then everyone in the house eats them. Do you need help with resources to provide to your family to help them understand Celiac?

I hope you find some answers and support here. Good luck!

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I agree with the others, it is a mindset. I'm not saying it is always easy to have a positive mindset. I often lose mine when I'm at a gluten filled party and everyone is enjoying amazing food but me. However, I am finally healthy. I can go to the gym and run and play. I still have pity parties. However, the positives of a gluten free diet far outweigh the negatives. It also helps to have such a supportive family.

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It is good to hear that I'm not the only one. I really do want to follow the diet and my family is an obstacle. They do have plenty of information, but at the same time believe that I try to be too careful. My mom still thinks that my doctor was right when he said that I am moderately gluten intolerant and can have some gluten. These are my walls. I don't know how to propose a "separated" kitchen. It is a different dynamic if you are the "child" and they are the parent than the other way around. Does anyone have suggestions?

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It is good to hear that I'm not the only one. I really do want to follow the diet and my family is an obstacle. They do have plenty of information, but at the same time believe that I try to be too careful. My mom still thinks that my doctor was right when he said that I am moderately gluten intolerant and can have some gluten. These are my walls. I don't know how to propose a "separated" kitchen. It is a different dynamic if you are the "child" and they are the parent than the other way around. Does anyone have suggestions?

Hi!! I've had many temptations and sadly enough I am WEAK when it comes to food...i mean I just long for pizza!!! I've only been on this diet for about 3 months and it's been super hard! This past weekend, I didn't have time to pack lunches for sat and sun and so the only thing I could buy was gluten filled stuff. So I bought and devoured it! Well this Wed and continuing today I've had bad stomach aches and a constant urge to go the bathroom all the time. This is the worst attack I had yet, and from now on I don't plan on giving in because I don't want to deal with this again.

As much for the kitchen thing, I would ask them to be a little more appreciating to your gluten free diet. There's nothing more you can do for the fact they are the bosses... My parents try hard to make foods I can eat but I'm in college so they only have to deal with me every once in awhile. I don't know your situations but maybe informing them on the disease on what can happen to you if you don't go gluten free will help. Or ask them to go gluten free for 5 days so they can understand what you have to go through and how hard it is and be more likely to "separate" the kitchen for you and make foods that EVERYONE in the family can enjoy. Just be blunt and talk with them.

PS Celiac is most of the time hereditary...so most likely you got the genes from someone. So most likely you're not the only one who has celiac in your family.

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Treen Bean, I agree that a major part of my problem is when I am watching others eating it. I work in a convenience store, and I see everyone buying cupcakes and cookies that I would love to eat.

The cancer issue and such are not enough to make me stay glutenfree. I don't get diarrhea, just pain for a day or two. Since I am already in pain with my arthritis, what is a little more pain? It makes me weak in the remaining glutenfree plan. What helps me is that a couple of my customers are celiac, and we keep each other strong. Having someone in your life that looks you in the face and says, "What are you doing?!?!?" goes a long way.

I wish I could get that on a message board, but here, I can just log off. My celiac friends in real life don't let me just turn away from them.

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I come from a huge Sicilian family that thinks food=love and pasta+bread=food so they get personally hurt if anyone refuses to eat their food. I just had to learn to say no, period. I had MAJOR cravings for quite a long time, but not anymore. Gluteny things just do not mean food to me anymore. Someone posted here once that processed wheat has opiate like qualities that our bodies are actually addicted to. We just need to imagine a doughnut to begin salivating, but the longer you are off the gluten crap the more that will just disappear.

You truly just need a different mindset. Use visualization techniques. Think of something utterly disgusting to you. Like: the putrid remains at the bottom of a public garbage can. Now imagine whatever is your most tempting cheat food, let's say it's a cupcake. Now take the cupcake and roll it around in the bottom of that garbage can. It's not as appealing anymore, is it? If you can make this work for a while, you won't want the same things you do now. Those things won't even seem like food anymore. And they're not, they're poison.

Good luck!

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For me, the threat of cancer is very real. I watched my father die of leukemia at 53. If that weren't enough, I get violently ill for weeks from the smallest amount of cross-conatmination.

However, none of those things seem real to you. For me, the thing that made gluten free life with my friends easier was that I'm now a better cook than everyone else and they all love my food. I make all sorts of awesome stuff for meals and awesome bakery items that taste better than most storebought stuff, so noone in my family or friends minds eating my food, because it usually rocks. If you go to the recipes section of this forum, you'll find not only a great deal of truly wonderful recipes, but you'll find a bunch of literal geniuses who can convert anything you want to gluten free.

So if you were able to, say, make a baked mac&cheese casserole that your family loves, maybe they wouldn't mind giving you more space for your stuff..... (I have a recipe if you want.)

I'm off to bake some banana bread!

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I struggle with temptation especially when grocery shopping or those rare times we eat out. Just yesterday in the grocery store I was wanting those little powdered sugar coverd donuts but what keeps me from getting them is the thought of doubling over in pain, a bloated stomach have the D followed by C all this lasting for 2-5 days. It is just not worth is not when there are such yummy gluten free tearts out there and I am learning how to make my own yummy treats. Don't get me wrong, I have been gluten free since Jan. 08 with a couple of cheats but they were not worth it so never never again and they were early in my gluten free days.

People who are not glulten free do not understand that you can't have any at all and surely that doctor didn't know what he was talking about. That like telling someone with a peanut allergy he can have a little bit of peanuts. NOT

Hang in there.

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Hi, I've had a really tough time dealing with eating gluten free, until recently, I went through my entire house, and got rid of any food product that contained any wheat/gluten, and then went grocery shopping, and forced myself to only get the stuff I can eat. This has really helped, because only having that kind of food in the house, forces you to come up with meals that you can eat. I have found some marinades that do not contain wheat that taste yummy, like A1 for example, they have some good marinades that we can eat. There are so many products that you can eat out there that you just don't know about, and I am finding more and more. Just try it, clean out your home of gluten, and only keep gluten free items in your home. It's really not as expensive as you think, I was always thrown off by the cost, and the taste of the gluten free items at like Trader Joe's and Henry's, but now I find, I can just go to a regular grocery store, and get practically everything I need for cheaper. I shop at the Commissary, and they recently started selling a lot of gluten-free products, like pasta noodles, bread mix, pancake mix, cookie mix, crackers, cake mix etc. Mixing some of those items with regular foods, like a normal roast meat with a safe marinade, makes things seem normal, because it tastes normal, and does not cost any more than you would have spent on wheat products. Hope you find this helpful.

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It is good to hear that I'm not the only one. I really do want to follow the diet and my family is an obstacle. They do have plenty of information, but at the same time believe that I try to be too careful. My mom still thinks that my doctor was right when he said that I am moderately gluten intolerant and can have some gluten. These are my walls. I don't know how to propose a "separated" kitchen. It is a different dynamic if you are the "child" and they are the parent than the other way around. Does anyone have suggestions?

I am not in your situation being an adult with my own kitchen. Would your family members be willing to come on the forum? There is a section for family members and there is a lot of support & good ideas there. I often read it so I can better empethize with others. Your family could better understand your needs & accomodate your very serious health concerns then.

To help me & others stick with the healthy eating, I visualize gluten foods as poison ivy. Would I eat a hamburger that had been wrapped in poison ivy (bun) even if it were removed from the bun & wiped off? NO.. and neither would anyone else. Would I eat food that had been in a toaster where poison ivy (bread) had been toasted or set my food on a counter full of poison ivy crumbs? To a server in a restaurant, I say, "Breads are like poison ivy in my body, so even if my food even touches bread, I'm going to have a reaction." That may be a little drastic but most laymen don't have a concept of the effects of gluten on your health. They mean well but I even don't understand all the compexities how could someone who doesn't have it?

Sorry for going on and on. I hope your family can extend a healing hand to you. Whether they do or not, we are here for you. You can always talk to us & we'll be here any time to here your problems or success stories. I know you'll feel better with every day that goes by.

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I've been using that imagining food as something gross or poison and it has helped me pass up the temptation to eat the item that had gluten. I really did it the last time I glutened myself and I am still feeling the effects, but I'm getting better. I accidentally had gluten after I dedicated myself to resisting temptation, but that had more to do with being in a foreign country where they do not label everything and somethings are not what they appear to be (I learned my lesson, only eat it if I know exactly what it is!)

My family may be willing to get on the forum, I didn't think of that. That cleaning out the kitchen idea is great, I just don't think my parents would appreciate me taking away all of their glutenous food. I do plan on having no gluten in my home when I have one of my own!

JNBunnie1, I would love that mac and cheese recipe! I have yet to find a decent macaroni and cheese, premade or homemade, I always end up throwing it out and then depressed that I went through all the work and was so excited for nothing. I hate those let down moments; I'm SO EXCITED to have _________! and then something happens to let you down.

Thank you all so much, everyone's personal stories makes me feel a little less alone and I appreciate being supported and not made to feel like a failure.

Any more suggestions about my parents? My mom at first did a little research, but really left it up to me to know about this. They also know that it is genetic and I asked them to consider getting tested, but neither thinks they are affected and seemed to be more concerned if I had asked the other parent to get tested too. So that is where they are: This is your disease, your problem so good luck. My mom still doesn't believe that there are cross contamination issues with stuffing a turkey with glutenous turkey, but I think I pestered her enough that she doesn't do it. And my dad refuses to make sure anything is gluten-free (thank goodness I don't live with him.)

Chrissy B, I think I saw you are from Colorado Springs. Have you been to Out of the Bread Box yet?

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Ok mac&cheese.

I use:

1 bag Tinkyada pasta shells

1 big huge pile of shredded cheese (mozz doesn't work well for this, unless it's fresh mozz in slices under the other cheese)

1/2 stick butter

diced onions if you want

enough milk to fill a 12x10 casserole halfway (maybe a quart, it's ok to use a little water to fill in)

Preheat oven to 375.

Pour dry Tinkyada pasta into pan, melt butter, stir into noodles. This is where you would add any seasonings you want, garlic, pepper, whatever. Stir good & flatten the noodles in a smooth layer. Then the shredded cheese goes on top, sorry I don't measure, but it needs to completely cover the noodles fairly thick, maybe 1/4 inch deep. No noodles showing. Do not stir. If you want a creamier end result, try slices of fresh mozz under the other shredded cheese, that's my favorite. If you use all cheddar and romano, say, or some provolone, the end result will be chewier. Just don't put mozz in any form on top or it will get way too dark too fast and be very chewy. My boyfriend loves it that way, but I like it creamy. It's yummy with diced onions mixed into the dry noodles too, I tried that last time. Next time I'll try browned ground beef.

Pour milk over all until you can just see it at the edges, not above the noodles but not too much below the noodles level either. Bake at 375 for 45 min-hour, depending on your oven and how brown you like the top. My noodles are done at 45 min in my oven, but it's a piece of crap, so don't take that to heart. It should be golden on top, when it starts to get too brown take it out and test it, when you go to scoop some out, there should be no loose fluid, there may be some grease from the cheese but no dripping milk.

Sorry this is so imprecise, but I swear it's fabulous. And it's really easy, I get my boyfriend to shred all the cheese for me! We buy big blocks of Land'o lakes. You could always buy it preshredded. My fave combo is mostly cheddar, a cup or two of romano, and soft mozz slices underneath.

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I grew up feeling like a freek in my house because of my allergies. I my folks could not get why I was not greatfull for powdered goats milk( cause it tastes really bad.) Rather then providing me with things I could eat they kept harping on what I could not eat due to allergies. For years I had my breakfast cheerios with water. Gross. So I know what it feels like.

but I also know that feeling sorry for myself will not help at all. In AA we have a saying "poor me, poor me, pour me another drink. "

I have to live in the solution, not the problem.

I also was sick enough and wanted my life back. When I was in my 20's gluten made me fat, depressed ( 7 years on antidepressants) and I would crave it like crack. I would sneak and keep it all to myself, I would reward myself and comfort myself with gluten things. Look out if you ate the last of my stash. I was not sick enough either to stop using it or to realize deep down that gluten was causing my depression. IN my 30's every time I went to the doctor they wanted to take something out. My parents thought I was one of those people that was addicted to surgery. In my 40's I had a goiter and my thyroid removed. The gluten that had once been my comfort totally turned on me. I have spent the last 2.5 years of my life in constant pain from fibro, and mostly asleep. What I am saying and what most will tell you is that it only gets worse. In a way it is like you have a toe that has a tiny infection. You can treat it now or you can wait.

You could wait until your toe swells and oozes or you can let it go and maybe treat it when you can not walk any more on your foot. Or maybe you can wait till you have gangrene and then treat it. Do you Want to start now while you only need a little ointment or wait until you have to uses a saw? This only get worse.

What helps me is to think the bite through. But then I get sick, tired and feel hung over.

You are not a freek, you are not a less then other people because you can not eat gluten.

Actually you are pretty lucky. It is at an early stage before much damage has been done to your body and

you have this board to ask questions to and to find out what you can eat. Some of us will say things in ways to hurt your feelings. I am sorry for that but that was the kind of talk we needed to get things though our heads at time and it is said with hope that you get well. Sometimes things just come across wrong on the web because you can not see us smile or nodding our head But we mean well.

Good luck

ONe more mile

I love the poison ivy idea I may use that one.

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Hello everyone.

I am not new the whole celiac thing, I have been diagnosed for longer than I'd like to admit for what I'm about to say.

I try to follow the diet, be good, but always fall into temptation. I don't know if anyone else has experienced the same thing and has suggestions for me. I have heard people say that they don't want to get sick, nor do I, but my reactions aren't so strong it stops me. I have also had people say they fear cancer, I believe this as valid, but still it is not a deterrent. Don't get me wrong, I appreciate my health and want a long life, but when I default I do not think of the future.

I was diagnosed when I was 15 years-old. I wasn't good at first, but this had more to do with a doctor that told me that I was only mildly gluten intolerant and could eat some gluten. With more research during a year I found out that this was misinformation. I have periods when I am good and then I see something or smell something delicious I resist, but at times I give in. I feel denied. I do have little support from family and friends, it is not as though they shove the food in my face, but at the same time they have done little to understand this. They don't understand what this means in my life.

How do I get past temptation? I miss the foods that I could eat. I find that I indulge on other, not healthy things to fill my non-gluten void, NOT GOOD TOO MUCH WEIGHT GAIN!!!!

If you have experienced this and have suggestions please let me know.

(I am also in a different country where they LOVE bread right now and gluten-free items are limited.)

Thank you all so much.

Dont worry. I dont cheat anymore but I use to! Now all I do is make all the food that temps me and bring it! Since I am still in school (high) and food tempting me is all around I just bring the same good stuff as well. Lets say in spanish we have a fiesta? I bring my own treats and it works fine. Honestly Im scared of what the wheat will do to my body, and I know seeing people eat other foods stink. And I dont know how I do it sometimes. At the begining I was really bad and use to cheat when my friends had good food items and I didnt. And it is extremely hard when like my family brings home doughnuts and all but I have gotten to the point where I smell them and all and I still dont want one because I am afraid of getting sick,ect. When doughnuts come home, I make doughnuts! I know I am only 15 but if I helped in any way, good! :)

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SeMeCl~

I have been going through the same exact thing. I was diagnosed with celiac in 2003 and for 2 years I lived completely gluten free. I was healthy, happy and 30 lbs lighter than I was before I was diagnosed. I had my first son in July 2005 and my second son in July 2006. From my first pregnancy up until about a month ago I ignored what I was supposed to do and ate whatever I wanted. Like you, the consequences of my actions werent enough to stop me. I knew what it was doing to me and I just didnt care. I loved food so much that I felt like following a gluten free diet was like losing a part of myself. I have finally realized that I have other issues behind my relationship with food that were causing me many problems (eating for comfort, "happiness", etc). For nearly my entire life (except for the 2 years I was gluten free), I have acted like food was my best friend. I ate when I was happy, when I was sad, when I felt alone, when I was celebrating..... you get the picture! Food was there like a friend would be. Food needs to be seen for what it is... fuel. The way I am looking at it now is that the gluten free diet is (in my opinion) probably one of the best ways for a person to eat... I stick to the basics... fruits, veggies, dairy, meats. Now I only eat what is necessary for my body to function and thrive. My sons and my husband do not have celiac but more often than not I find them eating off of my plate rather than eating the "regular" food I prepare for them! And yes, it is extremely difficult and yes I want to give up every single day... (imagine how difficult it is to prepare macaroni and cheese for my family and not even have a bite!!!)... But, the pounds are falling off (20lbs lost in the last month!!!), I have so much energy and my mood has improved dramatically. Basically, my problem had nothing to do with celiac and it had everything to do with my "issues" with food. Once I admitted my problem and worked though it, my compliance with the gluten free lifestyle was a breeze!

I hope this will help you in some way because I had a long, lonely, miserable journey to get where I am today!

Good luck!

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It is good to hear that I'm not the only one. I really do want to follow the diet and my family is an obstacle. They do have plenty of information, but at the same time believe that I try to be too careful. My mom still thinks that my doctor was right when he said that I am moderately gluten intolerant and can have some gluten. These are my walls. I don't know how to propose a "separated" kitchen. It is a different dynamic if you are the "child" and they are the parent than the other way around. Does anyone have suggestions?

that was my biggest problem - my house was a gluten-zone and my parents were so used to me being "the hypochondriac" that they couldn't adjust to the fact that i was RIGHT and should be taken seriously. i just bared with it until i moved out, sense i was already an older teen once diagnosed.

printing up medical websites explanation of how severe CC risk is can help. parents tend to believe doctors, even if they wont believe their own offspring.

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