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Ringing Ears And Hearing Loss

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I just came back from the ENT doc with a bottle of Prednisone. He doesn't feel it's autoimmune, but rather related to prolonged loud noise exposure, and I would guess he is correct.

But I'm so used to blaming everything on celiac, I can't help wondering if it's somehow related!

So I was wondering if anyone else here has had to deal with this. Being a musician, this is a bit scary for me. The ENT did say that he's seen very good results with prednisone, and is guessing I'll recover, but I'm still nervous.

Anyone?

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I have very mild hearing loss, and terrible constant ringing in my ears. My ENT could not find any reason for the ringing. Sometimes the ringing makes me want to scream, sometimes I can block it out, but it is never gone.

My ENT did say it's possible that malabsorption may have caused it to happen...I may never know. I do know it's not from loud music, but who knows otherwise!

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Well, in my job, I do have constant loud noise exposure, but usually wear earplugs when it's bad--except for last week. So it is certainly likely (but not guaranteed) that the noise had something to do with it.

I started the prednisone tonight, and my ears are already much, much better. (And you know me, I'm usually one to pooh-pooh medication.) I just hope it lasts (the improvement, not the prednisone--I will be off that in 12 days).

The ENT did dig out a 1/4 inch dried ball of earwax out of my ear, and said that while he does recommend ear plugs, they do have a tendency to prevent the wax from exiting the ear on its own, but that I just need to come in once a year or so to have it removed. He also said I had unusually narrow canal, which makes it tougher for the wax to come out. (I've also noticed that I have much more difficulty than my colleagues with getting the earplugs IN.)

Life is always an adventure, isn't it?

I read that adding white noise, like a fan, or headphones connected to an iPod with some kind of white noise playing on it, can make the ringing much more bearable. Haven't tried it yet, though.

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Life certainly is an adventure! When the ringing first started and was driving me crazy, a person told me to get earplugs to sleep with. He said it was the best thing for him. Well, for me, all they do is contain the noise inside my head and intensify it. At that time, I was walking the beach a lot and wondered if maybe the wind was causing the problem. I guess I will never know why it has attacked me.

Amazingly, the ringing doesn't keep me from sleeping, yet I do have to turn on the tv to drown it out. I have been diagnosed with sleep apnea, and now have a CPAP machine. I was hoping it may help with the ringing, but nope, it hasn't helped with anything so far. I have an appt with the sleep doc next Friday.

Yup, life is certainly an adventure!

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Actually last night I fell asleep watching TV, and woke up at 3 am with very loud ringing in one ear and the TV still on. I can't help wondering if my radio waves from the TV caused the ringing?

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My daughter was just turning 7 years old when diagnosed about 6 months ago. She complained of ringing in her ears prior to going gluten free and now talks about how nice it is not to have that annoying buzz in her ear(s) anymore. I never knew about it at the time - guess she just figured it was normal. She also said that her head used to hurt. Don't know if this helps you or not..... she has not been exposed to loud music or ear speakers or anything like that.

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I get ringing in my ears too, and certainly don't hear like I used to. I'm constantly asking people to repeat themselves (sometimes three, four or five times), especially if there's any kind of background noise at all. Ironically, I finally saw an ENT about this last year, after years of saying that I really needed to get my hearing checked (and my family telling me that as well).

So I had my ears checked (also complaining of dizziness and daily headaches for over two weeks straight) and the ENT says all is fine, the only thing I can't hear is a dog whistle (Yes, he actually said that).

I asked him why I was always asking people to repeat themselves then, and if there was anything that could be done to improve my hearing when there was background noise. He told me that my family and friends all mumbled, and that when I was out somewhere where there was background noise, to just make sure there was a wall behind me so I could hear better. <_<

Perhaps I need a second opinion?

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I asked him why I was always asking people to repeat themselves then, and if there was anything that could be done to improve my hearing when there was background noise. He told me that my family and friends all mumbled, and that when I was out somewhere where there was background noise, to just make sure there was a wall behind me so I could hear better.

Well, if your family isn't having trouble hearing each other, than yeah, that doc is useless. I too, must ask others to repeat things, and I honestly do not think everyone in the world mumbles, except for us! ;) I work for a doctor, and when there is a group of others talking, I can't hear on the phone...how would I get a wall behind that???

I too saw an ENT, he promised me he would figure out what was going on. He did one cat scan for sinuses, and some hearing tests. He said I have very minimal hearing loss (although, I would like to see how well others hear when there is a field of cicadas in their head). He was on vacation when my cat scan results came in, one of his assosicates called me, and asked me if I was ok. Scared me! When I told him I think I am ok, that I had a reaction to some cleaning supplies my boss had used, he told me my doctor would be calling me for a follow up appt after he returned from vacation. I never heard from him again. He had promised me answers, and in not calling me back, I lost all faith in him. I did not go back. Too many disappointing doctors.

AMQmom, that's wonderful for your daughter, I'm so happy she found relief. I have been gluten free for over 4 yrs, and the severe ringing didn't start until 4 yrs ago, probably not gluten related, but who knows.

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I have a situation where my doctor tells me that my right eardrum is "drawn in". There is fluid in back of it, and it creates a feeling of my needing to "pop" it all the time. I also get a "whooshing" sound that comes and goes--no rhyme or reason to it.

I do get mildly dizzy once in a while, but it isn't a problem since it's rather vague. Since it's a eustation tube dysfunction, I use a steroid nasal spray which helps temporarily. Antihistamines are also useful for this, as are decongestants if tolerated.

She told me that if the dizziness gets worse, I can go to a specialist to have the "three bones" addressed, although in my case, she doesn't recommend that at this time.

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I started losing my hearing in my early twenties (I'm 45 now). I was diagnosed with otosclerosis (the bones in the ear harden and can't send the sound waves to the brain). I recommend you see a specialist, and have a hearing test. I've had tinnitus since my mid-twenties. It got worse when I went on Synthroid this past July, so I switched to natural thyroid; and the tinnitus lessened to where it's always been.

I think I remember the specialist saying that they believe hormones have alot to do with otosclerosis - and my hormones have been out of whack forever. Anyway, I'm not sure what percentage of hearing loss I have; but I can't hear without my hearing aid (I should wear two hearing aids, but my ear drum in one ear is constantly 'sucked in' and it gets painful, so I can't wear a hearing aid in that ear).

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I just came back from the ENT doc with a bottle of Prednisone. He doesn't feel it's autoimmune, but rather related to prolonged loud noise exposure, and I would guess he is correct.

But I'm so used to blaming everything on celiac, I can't help wondering if it's somehow related!

So I was wondering if anyone else here has had to deal with this. Being a musician, this is a bit scary for me. The ENT did say that he's seen very good results with prednisone, and is guessing I'll recover, but I'm still nervous.

Anyone?

wow my husband has both of these two....perhaps the malnutrition part of celiac damaged

the inner hearing bones in the ear. Just like osteoporosis.

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tinnitus is common when there is exposure to loud sounds. being a musician puts you at pretty darn high risk for hearing loss!

here's a decibel-damage chart http://www.dangerousdecibels.org/hearingloss.cfm

and another that includes loudness ratings for some common musical instruments: http://www.gcaudio.com/resources/howtos/loudness.html (and one that relates that to dynamics: http://www.aamhl.org/dBchart.htm)

you mention difficulty with earplugs, but I cannot emphasis enough that you *always* use them whenever you're around noises that could cause damage. while ordinary ear plugs may be an issue for you, consider getting custom fitted ear plugs. yes, they run about $200 for a pair, but they'll last you somewhere between 5 and 10 years. there's a reason you find reference to etymotic's custom earplugs on all kinds of musician's webpages, they're good. (I only wish I could afford the custom fit headphones ;) ) http://www.etymotic.com/ephp/erme.aspx. I learned about them from my brother in law, who plays piano, and used to design speakers for a living, then speaker test equipment. (quite the audiophile, and takes his hearing very seriously.)

they have a flat response curve, so they do very little to alter the sounds you hear. additionally, the custom plugs are designed to minimize the "rain barrel" effect of just emphasizing the sounds inside your head. doesn't make it go away, but way better than foam ear plugs or any other cheap kind. not to mention, they're comfortable! ;) (I have pediatric size ear canals, apparently, which must have been why I found most ear plugs horridly uncomfortable. also doesn't help wax buildup...) you can use different button inserts for either 9dB, 15dB, or 25dB attenuation.

I'm not trying to sound like a salesman here - I have no contact with the company. my brother in law taught me a great respect for hearing while still thoroughly enjoying the music you love.

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I get very sound sensitive sometimes; drives me up a wall. and I used their 15dB cheap ear plugs for years - carried them with me everywhere, used 'em at concerts, planes, all that. but they just weren't comfortable enough, and since they didn't fit well, they probably weren't 15dB for me. I hemmed and hawed about forking over $200 for custom ones. I mean, $200 for *earplugs*?! WTF? Right? I'm so glad I did. I totally keep those with me all the time. Used them at Bumbershoot for Paramoure and Offspring... made it quite comfortable to listen to. ;) None of that temporary hearing loss my husband reported. ;) Use 'em at work all the time too.

Take care with your hearing! And many, many more years of happy music playing!

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Bumbershoot! I remember Bumbershoot! (My first job was with the Seattle Symphony, many, many years ago...I miss Seattle!!!!)

Thanks for the good wishes. The ringing is much, much better, and I thought my hearing was coming back--but now I have a pretty nasty cold, and my head is all plugged up, so I can't hear anyway, thanks to the Prednisone turning off my immune system--I usually fight these stupid colds off much better. :angry:

One interesting thing--I'd been trying to describe one of the ways my ears were ringing, when I did NOT have tinnitus (which came a couple of days later)--it was like the sensation of extremely loud ringing, but with no noise. (Yeah, I know that sounds weird.) I described it to the audiologist as an "aural migraine," because it reminded me a lot of the sensation I get with migraines, but in my ears instead of in my eyes.

I met someone today who had been diagnosed with aural migraines--there is actually such a thing.

:blink:

But the audiologist looked at me like I was crazy. Apparently, she'd never heard of it either.

Oh, well.

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