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LisaInTexas

Help With Interpreting Enterolab Results

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Hi there~

First post. Not sure if I put it in the right spot...but I sure would appreciate help in knowing more about my below results. Specifically the genes. Where do I go for more info if I've already scoured this site and other postings. It's hard for me to understand the HLA stuff with just my Radio/TV/Film degree. ;) Please help me understand specifically what my results mean. Do I have celiac or if I stay gluten free...am I preventing it from rearing it's ugly head? What about future children and pregnancy? Will my kids need to be gluten free right off the bat or do I "wait and see" if they suffer from symptoms first? Also...what advice do y'all have in approaching this with parents? They are concerned for me...but this also relates to THEM. Lots to um...digest. Just lookin' for other good resources and advice. THANKS in advance y'all. ~Lisa

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 17 (Normal Range <10 Units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 11 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score <300 Units (Normal Range <300 Units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 7 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0602

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,1 (Subtype 2,6)

Interpretation of Fecal Antigliadin IgA: Intestinal antigliadin IgA antibody was elevated, indicating that you have active dietary gluten sensitivity. For optimal health, resolution of symptoms (if you have them), and prevention of small intestinal damage and malnutrition, osteoporosis, and damage to other tissues (like nerves, brain, joints, muscles, thyroid, pancreas, other glands, skin, liver, spleen, among others), it is recommended that you follow a strict and permanent gluten free diet. As gluten sensitivity is a genetic syndrome, you may want to have your relatives screened as well.

Interpretation of Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA: You have an autoimmune reaction to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase, secondary to dietary gluten sensitivity.

Interpretation of Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: Provided that dietary fat is being ingested, a fecal fat score less than 300 indicates there is no malabsorbed dietary fat in stool indicating that digestion and absorption of nutrients is currently normal.

Interpretation of Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody: Levels of fecal IgA antibody to a food antigen greater than or equal to 10 are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic "sensitivity" to that food. For any elevated fecal antibody level, it is recommended to remove that food from your diet. Values less than 10 indicate there currently is minimal or no reaction to that food and hence, no direct evidence of food sensitivity to that specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test.

Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: HLA-DQB1 gene analysis reveals that you have one of the main genes that predisposes to gluten sensitivity and celiac sprue, HLA-DQB1*0201 or HLA-DQB1*0302. Each of your offspring has a 50% chance of receiving this gene from you, and at least one of your parents passed it to you. You also have a non-celiac gene predisposing to gluten sensitivity (any DQ1, DQ2 not by HLA-DQB1*0201, or DQ3 not by HLA-DQB1*0302). Having one celiac gene and one gluten sensitive gene, means that each of your parents, and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of a gluten sensitive gene. Having two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity or celiac disease may be more severe.

For more information about result interpretation, please see http://www.enterolab.com/StaticPages/Faq_R...erpretation.htm

Stool Analysis performed by: Frederick Ogunji, Ph.D., EnteroLab

Molecular Gene Analysis performed by: American Red Cross

Interpretation of all results by: Kenneth D. Fine, M.D., EnteroLab

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hi,

You have the celiac gene DQ2. Your children have a 50%chance of receiving this gene from you. Even if they do get the gene from you that does not mean the reaction to gluten will be triggered. It can be triggered early in life or later in life or not at all.

You should tell your parents, you got the gene from one of them.

According to the antibody levels you are having a reaction to gluten.

Good luck

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Enterolab cannot dx Celiac. You have obvious gluten sensitivity and a Celiac gene. Are you gluten-free right now? If you are not you can go get bloodwork for Celiac from your regular doctor.

If you do not care for an official dx of Celiac, then you can just adopt the gluten-free diet and get healthy. You need to be on it for life.

Yes, your kids can get the Celiac gene from you and if your mate also has a Celiac gene and passes it on, this increases the susceptibilty.

First, work on getting yourself well. :)

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Each of your children will inherit one of those genes. Either the DQ2 or the DQ1. You inherited one of those genes from your mother and one of them from your father.

The U S medical community will catch up with the rest of the world in the next few years... If you do not have a diagnosis of celiac on your medical records, since you are so young, you might want to leave it that way.

It really does not matter if you have celiac, an allergy, or gluten intolerance, the treatment is the same - you cannot eat gluten. In my case almost all my other food allergies went away, but I cannot eat grains, for the most part grains are not in my everyday diet plan. The gluten free grains get added in for "treats & cheats" ;)

I love Enterolab.com

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Enterolab cannot dx Celiac. You have obvious gluten sensitivity and a Celiac gene. Are you gluten-free right now? If you are not you can go get bloodwork for Celiac from your regular doctor.

If you do not care for an official dx of Celiac, then you can just adopt the gluten-free diet and get healthy. You need to be on it for life.

Yes, your kids can get the Celiac gene from you and if your mate also has a Celiac gene and passes it on, this increases the susceptibilty.

First, work on getting yourself well. :)

Thanks y'all. I appreciate the help and clarification. Yes, I am gluten free. I started the diet change on 10/20; although I'm finding out gluten is in more things than I thought. Now I'm experiencing some weird "gotta go" moments like I've not had in a while. <_< My joint pain, headaches, back pain, neck pain, DH/rash, night sweats and moodiness have all become noticeably better just over the last couple weeks, though - so that's encoruaging.

Since I've had routine blood tests done for the last 7 years of my life with no positive results, I don't plan on doing it again for $h!t$ and giggles if I am already seeing a positive response from the change in my diet. I think I will stick to what you suggest - adopt the gluten-free diet, get healthy and stay with it for life. I won't borrow trouble and worry about my (future) kiddos just yet. Thanks again. :)

~Lisa

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You mentioned you have DH, dermatitis herpetiformis.

That is the other form of celiac disease.

If you have a diagnosis for DH, you are automatically a celiac. This is neither new or debated in the medical field.

If you have been diagnosed with DH, they should have put you on a gluten-free diet back then and given you a celiac diagnosis.

nora

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