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Picky Eater

Gluten-free Food And Teenagers

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I need some advice. My 14 year old daughter was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes in August and Celiac in September. She is doing great with the diabetes, but is still struggling with Celiac. She is a very picky eater and has not been eating a gluten-free diet completely yet. I can't get her to understand that it is very important. Please let me know your thoughts.

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It's really hard with teens and sometime you just cant win. They will have to be responsible for their own health. I know that is hard to accept.

But, what you can do is make sure you prepare delicious and nutritious gluten-free foods in your home. Unfortunately, a lot of the gluten-free processed foods will make her diabetes hard to control.

Focus on good gluten-free complex carbohydrates like brown rice, buckwheat, quinoa, etc. Learn to make them that tastes yummy. With my daughter I cooked these grains in gluten-free chicken broth and she loved them. Now I am not eating grains. But enjoying all of the wonderful winter squashes available. And she loves them too. A dollop of butter and salt and they are very good.

Low sugar fruits are good and you can make tarts and such with almond meal flour, fruit and stevia. Some recipe books might be in order. And have her join in and learn how to cook yummy gluten-free foods for herself. It could be a bonding experience for mother and daughter.

Keep an eye out for gluten-free cooking classes. I see them around here from time to time.

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I found this cookbook. It is Canadian, but no reason you cant have it shipped to the U.S.

Great Temptations: Recipes for People with Celiac Disease and Diabetes

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You could see if she is interested in joining the teens section of this forum...once she makes connections she might not think it so bad. She can have friends in the same boat to vent with and encourage her.

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I need some advice. My 14 year old daughter was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes in August and Celiac in September. She is doing great with the diabetes, but is still struggling with Celiac. She is a very picky eater and has not been eating a gluten-free diet completely yet. I can't get her to understand that it is very important. Please let me know your thoughts.

Didn't she have SOME symptoms for you to get her tested?

My son was 18 when diagnosed and initially he went in total denial, but it only lasted a few days. I had to let him own it though, but he was already "of age" where your daughter is not. He, like me, did not have the diarrhea and chronic aches, etc, but he was SO fatigued and finally was able to realize the two went together. He was napping during the day because he just could not make it though the day without one. We also just found out that he already has more osteopenia than *I* do and I'm 45! So it was definitely affecting him, but not in immediate dramatic fashion.

Hopefully you can find a support group in your area where there are others her age who have it and they can meet her. It really does stink to have this disease, much less to have diabetes as well. Encourage her all you can with how well she is doing with the diabetes and let her share her feelings. You can have the proper foods at home, but cannot really control when she is out. But there is so much out there that you can usually find a substitute for just about anything and still make it gluten free. I finally found a bread recipe for sandwiches that honestly does not taste that different than the whole wheat bread I was making months ago. That was a BIGGIE for my son.

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Didn't she have SOME symptoms for you to get her tested?

My son was 18 when diagnosed and initially he went in total denial, but it only lasted a few days. I had to let him own it though, but he was already "of age" where your daughter is not. He, like me, did not have the diarrhea and chronic aches, etc, but he was SO fatigued and finally was able to realize the two went together. He was napping during the day because he just could not make it though the day without one. We also just found out that he already has more osteopenia than *I* do and I'm 45! So it was definitely affecting him, but not in immediate dramatic fashion.

Hopefully you can find a support group in your area where there are others her age who have it and they can meet her. It really does stink to have this disease, much less to have diabetes as well. Encourage her all you can with how well she is doing with the diabetes and let her share her feelings. You can have the proper foods at home, but cannot really control when she is out. But there is so much out there that you can usually find a substitute for just about anything and still make it gluten free. I finally found a bread recipe for sandwiches that honestly does not taste that different than the whole wheat bread I was making months ago. That was a BIGGIE for my son.

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Beth,

The only reason we found out she has Celiac is when she was in the hospital for her diabetes and they told me they automatically screen for it. She has absolutely no symptoms whatsoever. That is why it is so hard for me to get her to eat all gluten-free meals. She has breakfast down pat, and some of her dinners, but none of her lunches. Since she is such a picky eater, it is hard at school. I thank you for your response. Could you please send me the recipe for the bread, as we have not been able to find one that she will eat. I guess I am going to have to put my foot down and tell her it is time to start.

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Hi Picky-Eater,

That's great that they caught your daughter's celiac early....I know some Diabetes docs test automatically- wonderful. And it should make it easier to control her blood sugar if she is gluten-free too, from what I've read.

My son was resistant to going gluten-free/CF but he is not growing and wants to very badly so that is a good motivator for him. Does your daughter have a similar motivation? Perhaps she wants to be more independent, which is hard to do if your blood sugar is not controlled.

With teenagers (speaking only for myself...I have two) you have to balance the carrot and the stick. Only you the parent can make that call. With diabetes in the picture you may have more clout because her health is truely and absolutely in the balance. But we all know that kids can go out and buy almost anything they want when their parents aren't around and parents can't watch them 24/7/365.

The deal my son and I made is that when he's an adult he can make other choices but for now he can't. My contribution is treats because he needs to gain weight. Anything he wants, I make. I've tried 8 pizza crust recipes and finally found one that we like. Brownies. Carrot Cake. PB cookies. Pasta. Tacos. Turkey, pumpkin pie and all the trimmings. Yorkshire pudding at Christmas. You get the idea.

Good luck!

~Laura

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Welcome to the board!! I think you have been given great advice. I think coming in and reading some of the teen section could help her wrap her mind around the whole thing. It's a lot to take in especially at her age and double conditions! Wow, I really admire her for being able to face each day. I might just want to pull the covers over my head!

Her helping with the cooking also can help her own it. I know once I learned to prepare my "must have" foods I felt so much more in control. Otherwise you just feel like the person who can't eat anything.

Hang in there. She'll come around and she's lucky you're so on top of her health.

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Just guessing . . . at home she's doing well . . . but with her friends??? I think at that age, kids just want to "look" normal. I would help her research some foods (and she's old enough to get involved and learn to help herself) that she can get at the fast food restaurants. The stuff she can get out of a vending machine or at a convenience store . . . the mainstream, namebrand stuff. There's plenty of it out there. And yes, I know that's not the best/healthiest stuff to eat . . . but we're talking teenagers here and appearances and peer pressure are real issues that need to be addressed.

What does her school cafeteria serve? Can she get a salad? yogurt? Are there a couple of things that she can buy ala carte to supplement a couple of items brought from home for lunch? Is there a favorite food that she keeps cheating with?? We can help you with a good alternative/replacement.

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Just guessing . . . at home she's doing well . . . but with her friends??? I think at that age, kids just want to "look" normal. I would help her research some foods (and she's old enough to get involved and learn to help herself) that she can get at the fast food restaurants. The stuff she can get out of a vending machine or at a convenience store . . . the mainstream, namebrand stuff. There's plenty of it out there. And yes, I know that's not the best/healthiest stuff to eat . . . but we're talking teenagers here and appearances and peer pressure are real issues that need to be addressed.

What does her school cafeteria serve? Can she get a salad? yogurt? Are there a couple of things that she can buy ala carte to supplement a couple of items brought from home for lunch? Is there a favorite food that she keeps cheating with?? We can help you with a good alternative/replacement.

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School lunches are the hardest for her because she does not like salads, lunchmeats - pretty much nothing except pizza, chicken nuggets, mozzarella sticks and french fries. The school is not willing to let me bring in a toaster oven or do anything to help her. I got fed up with the school. We have to eventually figure out what to bring for lunch and stick with it. I did buy a thermos, but she is not willing to try to bring her own lunch yet. I have not been pushing her because I cannot be with her 24/7 - she needs to be willing to change the foods that she will eat. This is very hard to deal with. Any lunch ideas would be helpful (but consider that she is very picky). Thanks.

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Would she be willing to eat trail mix? This is what I lived off in high school. I hated the school food and hated the idea of lugging a bag of lunch. But trail mix could easily be put in my purse. I would mix up my own using nuts, seeds, sometimes dried fruit, coconut and occasionally chocolate chips. Of course with diabetes, the chocolate and fruit would have to be limited, but the seeds and nuts shouldn't be a problem. Another option (if she likes it) would be a GoRaw pumpkin seed bar. It's filling and has 24g of carbs in it. I have diabetes myself and it's what I keep around for an emergency meal when I am out somewhere. My daughter used to eat them too, but one day she just decided she didn't like them.

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Somwe off the top of my head ideas:

How about a gluten-free boyfriend? Betcha that would do the trick!

Picture of a diseased/damaged small intestine on the fridge?

Some box lunches to bring with her that are actually better than the school food? She's picky but you never know - how about one of those fancy Japanese boxes to go? Or something trendy from the local Whole Foods/Gourmet shop? (Kids today, eh? I brought my lunch to scvhool with me every day for four straight years!)

I would not 'put my foot down' - that's a for sure way to get her to rebel. Somehow you've got to make it her idea and her cause. Someone had the idea of the teen forum here. That's good thinking.

How about suggesting she start a club at school? If she was the president of the Gluten-Free Dieters I'm sure she wouldn't cheat at lunch? And it would boost her self-esteem. Perhaps combine the diabetes and celiac into some kind of Eating Right club?

My school had Home Econ where we learned to cook - does she get to attend such a thing? Maybe she could talk to the teacher about gluten-free recipes?

Have you tried to talk to her about all of the other reasons people go on a gluten-free diet? Maybe if she thought she was doing it for some other reason she might be more inclined to go along with it. For her weight or her skin or etc.

Has she read any of the books or surfed any of the websites?

I think the key is to somehow turn her into an advocate of the lifestyle. It would also boost her self-esteem to know that she is in charge of her body and that what she is doing is good for her body. Try to glamorize the gluten-free lifestyle somehow ... Any celebrities out there swear by it? How about teen idols that are gluten-free?

How about a mutual visit to a nutritionist/dietitian?

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I send mac&cheese in the thermos (food jar) and that goes over well with my kids. You could do chicken nuggets, too (we like the Bell&Evans brand) but I'm not sure if they would stay crispy . . . I'm guessing not but I haven't tried it. How about tacos? Send the taco meat in the thermos and have tostitos for scooping and some shredded cheese to sprinkle on top. Ortega also has the individual mexican cheese cups that she could do some "nachos" with.

Does she like rice . . . flavored or plain that you could throw stuff in - kind of stir fryish but only with stuff she likes . . . peanuts, chicken, pork, chopped carrot)

I'll think about it some more.

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Beth,

The only reason we found out she has Celiac is when she was in the hospital for her diabetes and they told me they automatically screen for it. She has absolutely no symptoms whatsoever. That is why it is so hard for me to get her to eat all gluten-free meals. She has breakfast down pat, and some of her dinners, but none of her lunches. Since she is such a picky eater, it is hard at school. I thank you for your response. Could you please send me the recipe for the bread, as we have not been able to find one that she will eat. I guess I am going to have to put my foot down and tell her it is time to start.

She does have symptoms. She has diabetes. That's why the doctor at your hospital screened for Celiac. I know your daughter seems to be handling the diabetes fairly well, but you might want to have a chat with her about how many other autoimmune disorders she's willing to put herself at risk for so that she can continue to eat junk food for lunch. Why doesn't she have breakfast for lunch? Bring cereal and buy a milk, peanut butter rice cakes, deviled eggs, kasha porridge is very good cold with fruit in it. And please I beg you, try harder with your school. There is no school that should be so callous and unhelpful, if anything they should provide her access to a microwave so she can have soup or pasta for lunch.

Oh-try making homemade chicken noodle soup with rice noodles. She might change her mind about what she 'likes'. Make sure to boil the noodles in the broth, makes them super yummy.

For sandwich bread, perfect for pb&j, try this blog: http://glutenfreebay.blogspot.com/search/label/breads

about 2/3 of the way down, it's called Gluten Free Bread That just might make you cry. And boy is it good, works better in a bread machine for me personally.

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More lunch ideas for Picky Eater's daughter. (P.S. Let us know how it goes....thanks)

I use the wide mouth thermos jars too for school lunches. I heat them up with tap water first, then put boiling water in and let it sit for 5 minutes while I heat the food. This way the food stays hot for 4-5 hours, not just tepid.

Maybe homemade lasagna would imitate pizza flavors? You could put it in the thermos.

Chili - homemade or canned Hormel is gluten-free (I have a great vegitarian chili recipe)

Soup - Progresso or Amy's each have some that are gluten-free and some DF.

Leftover curry, casseroles, stews, spagetti and meatballs -- whatever you serve at home.

Baked beans, mac&cheese. I put a hot dog in these for extra protein.

For cool meals, I send hummus or salsa with gluten-free tortilla chips.

Or try sending mozzarella sticks, gluten-free crackers and a gluten-free cookie or cereal bar (Envirokids are good). Save the experimenting (and balanced meals) for home. Many kids eat that kind of lunch and to her friends, no one will know that the meal is gluten-free so there shouldn't be any teasing or peer pressure. The trail mix is a good idea. I did homemade trail mix of nuts, dried cherries or craisins and chocolate chips or white chocolate chips. Or chex mix with rice chex, peanuts etc. Use gluten-free soy sauce.

Good luck!

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I need some advice. My 14 year old daughter was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes in August and Celiac in September. She is doing great with the diabetes, but is still struggling with Celiac. She is a very picky eater and has not been eating a gluten-free diet completely yet. I can't get her to understand that it is very important. Please let me know your thoughts.

You and I are in the same boat here with the gluten. My daughter is 16 and refuses to deal with it at all. I am not going to force her so please no one suggest that. She is doesn't understand fully the ramifications but she has said she doesn't get sick enough for it to make it bad enough for her to not eat it all the time. It is hard enough being a teen but being different in this way when they all feel they are different in the first place. She said when she gets older she will deal with it. I keep guiding her but I am not going to force it. Its something she has to decide on her own. I don't like it and I provide gluten free food as much as I can to her. She knows that gluten free tastes just fine but again she isn't going to do it when she is away from home or has friends over.

I also have a son that is 23 that refuses to deal with the possibility. Its like anything they have to choose just as we do. You can say well DUH shouldn't be a choice, its your health why wouldn't you follow the diet. Oh I don't know, people smoke even though they have heard it can be harmful but you can't make them stop. It is a choice. Guide her and provide the right foods but don't push, she will go the other way as fast as possible.

Good luck because as one parent to another, we all need it! :rolleyes:

Oh I have another son that just went gluten free last month so they do grow up at some point in time! There is hope and age is the great equalizer!

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You can make chicken nuggets. Dip the pieces of chicken in a gluten-free flour, egg and then Rice Chex cereal that has been processed in a food processor or blender or a loaf of EnerG bread that has been processed(freeze the extra crumbs in a ziplock). Freeze them(uncooked) on a tray that has been lined with parchment or waxed paper and transfer to a container or ziplock. Deep fry straight from the freezer or defrost gently in the microwave and pan fry in a generous amount of oil. Drain on paper towels and let cool to room temp.before packing in a container to take to school. If there's any steam in the container, the breading will get soft.

Here's a bread recipe that has been well received.

http://www.glutenfreeforum.com/index.php?s...=28633&st=0

I substitute gluten-free oats that have been processed in the food processor for the flax seeds that the recipe calls for. I can eat it with my blood sugar problems but have to eat enough protein with it. I slice it a little thin.

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For breading any kind of chicken nuggets or meats I use gluten-free instant potato flakes. I just buy the WalMart brand. You can season any way you like but the coating is crispy and delicious. Easy to use too.

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Beth,

The only reason we found out she has Celiac is when she was in the hospital for her diabetes and they told me they automatically screen for it. She has absolutely no symptoms whatsoever. That is why it is so hard for me to get her to eat all gluten-free meals. She has breakfast down pat, and some of her dinners, but none of her lunches. Since she is such a picky eater, it is hard at school. I thank you for your response. Could you please send me the recipe for the bread, as we have not been able to find one that she will eat. I guess I am going to have to put my foot down and tell her it is time to start.

My 13 year old daughter just started the gluten free diet last week (after her biopsy). So far so good. She is used to gluten free food because I have Celiac disease. I have been involving her in making alot of the gluten free foods that I supply for her because she is keen about learning to cook.

I have found a great bread wrap at Gluten Free gobsmacked blog site that she likes (I just leave out the seeds), she is my pickiest eater so I was happy that she like this. It is a great one to make because it only takes about 5 minutes to throw together then 16 minutes to cook. It makes enough for about 3 sandwiches.

Gluten Free, Whole Grain Sandwich Wraps

Recipe makes one jelly roll pan of wraps/ gluten-free lavash bread

Ingredients:

1/4 cup sorghum flour

1/4 cup millet flour

1/4 cup potato starch (NOT flour)

1/4 cup tapioca starch

1 Tablespoons yeast

2 Tablespoons powdered buttermilk or non-dairy powdered milk

2 teaspoons xanthan gum

3/4 cup of warm water (+/- tablespoons of water)

1 1/2 teaspoons agave nectar

1 teaspoon olive oil

1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar

3/4 teaspoons salt

3/4 teaspoons cracked black pepper*

3/4 teaspoons cumin*

3/4 teaspoons dill*

3/4 teaspoons fennel*

(*Feel free to omit the seasonings (but not the salt) if you prefer a plain flavor. I found the herbs to be an amazing addition for my sandwiches.)

Directions:

1. Preheat your oven to 400F.

2. Mix together the dry ingredients in the bowl of your mixer - sorghum, millet, potato starch, tapioca starch, xanthan gum, yeast, powdered buttermilk, salt and optional seasonings.

3. Mix together the water (start with 3/4 cup), agave nectar, olive oil and vinegar.

4. Pour the liquid ingredients into the dry and mix on low until blended. The dough should not resist the beaters and bounce around in the bowl but rather be more of a soft cookie dough - maybe even a bit more wet.

5. Beat the dough on high for no more than 2 minutes. Line a jelly roll pan with parchment paper. Spread the dough as thinly as possible to cover the 10 x 15″ jelly roll pan. (To do this, I used a rubber spatula and kept dipping it in to water to keep the dough from sticking. This dough is not really as sticky as you might think - but the extra water helps push it out easier.)

6. Bake at 400F for 13-16 minutes until the top begins to brown and the edges are browned. Let cool completely before storing in an airtight bag. (I rolled mine up in the parchment paper and then tucked it in to a gallon size Ziploc last night before heading off to bed.)

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