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Oonagh

Us Produced Malto Dextrin Is No Longer Safe

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In my post above, I gave a summary of one study to refute the "just guessing" comment. For anyone who thought my summary post listed every study ever conducted, it did not. Before a final answer is known, there will have to be many studies testing many aspects of gluten sensitivity.

Because a generalization is made from preliminary results, doesn't mean that the ones not in the central group "don't matter". If you want to deal with every extreme, the only answer is plastic bubbles for everyone.

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Questions regarding concerns of maltodextrin should be contained in this thread. As interesting as they may be, collateral conversations would be best served as a new topic.

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I agree with the first two parts of that, but the third is just wrong. There have been several studies where confirmed celiacs were given controlled amounts of gluten with before and after endoscopy results compared. Of the studies I've read about, most used small samples for short periods (one had about 40 people for three months). The results show that most people in the test showed no change in their villi on small amounts of gluten but there were outliers who had significant damage on small amounts and ones who had no damage on relatively high amounts.

Just because a study hasn't resulted in definitive answers doesn't mean any generalizations are "just guessing".

This is exactly what I meant, Tim, and thanks for putting it better than I did. There are ways to measure villi damage and how much exposure will cause it. I am one of the lucky ones who are uber sero-positive so have a point of reference to refer back to. I also am about as sensitive a Celiac as they come and cannot tolerate gluten, period.

However, no one on this forum or anywhere else lives a completely gluten-free lifestyle, unless you grow your own food and never eat anything that is not within your total control.....in other words, impossible to achieve. So, at various times, you will be exposed to and ingest some level of gluten. I think if there are those who do so and think they react down to 1 PPM, then they would not recover and have any quality of life. Celiacs do recover and many recover well. This couldn't be possible for many if it were true that the immune system was routinely triggered at such miniscule amounts. I would also guess that many who showed damage on smaller amounts (whatever those amounts are) could possibly suffer from refractory sprue, where there is no healing taking place.

I think the medical profession has done a good job with the research side of Celiac Disease and I think they are correct with their numbers. Where they fail miserably is recognizing and diagnosing the disease. That's the real problem.

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However, no one on this forum or anywhere else lives a completely gluten-free lifestyle, unless you grow your own food and never eat anything that is not within your total control.....in other words, impossible to achieve. So, at various times, you will be exposed to and ingest some level of gluten. I think if there are those who do so and think they react down to 1 PPM, then they would not recover and have any quality of life. Celiacs do recover and many recover well. This couldn't be possible for many if it were true that the immune system was routinely triggered at such miniscule amounts. I would also guess that many who showed damage on smaller amounts (whatever those amounts are) could possibly suffer from refractory sprue, where there is no healing taking place.

Not everyone heals at the same pace, not everyone heals, even Dr. Green tells us that...they do not know why some do, and some don't. I do have very good control over my foods, because I do not eat "gluten free" labeled foods, nore nearly anything processed. I do react to 5ppm. and if you don't, thats wonderful for you. Yet, don't try to tell those of us who do suffer, that we are wrong.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coeliac_disease

The diet can be cumbersome; failure to comply with the diet may cause relapse. The term gluten-free is generally used to indicate a supposed harmless level of gluten rather than a complete absence. The exact level at which gluten is harmless is uncertain and controversial. A recent systematic review tentatively concluded that consumption of less than 10 mg of gluten per day is unlikely to cause histological abnormalities, although it noted that few reliable studies had been done. Regulation of the label gluten-free varies widely by country. For example, in the United States, the term gluten-free is not yet regulated. The current international Codex Alimentarius standard, established in 1981, allows for 50 mg N/100 g on dry matter, although a proposal for a revised standard of 20 ppm in naturally gluten-free products and 200 ppm in products rendered gluten-free has been accepted. Gluten-free products are usually more expensive and harder to find than common gluten-containing foods. Since ready-made products often contain traces of gluten, some coeliacs may find it necessary to cook from scratch.

Even while on a diet, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) may be lower in people with coeliac disease. Studies in the United States have found that quality of life becomes comparable to the general population after staying on the diet, while studies in Europe have found that quality of life remains lower, although the surveys are not quite the same. Men tend to report more improvement than women. Some have persisting digestive symptoms or dermatitis herpetiformis, mouth ulcers, osteoporosis and resultant fractures. Symptoms suggestive of irritable bowel syndrome may be present, and there is an increased rate of anxiety, fatigue, dyspepsia and musculoskeletal pain.

Everyone is different, but many people with coeliac disease also have one or more additional food allergies or food intolerances, which may include milk protein (casein), corn (maize), soy, amines, or salicylates.

I have come to not trust maltodextrin, and I do not buy foods with it in them. Even if it's just CC, it's still is harmful to the super sensitive.

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I think that it's possible that some of us here are simply sensitive to maltodextrin in a way that might have nothing directly to do with gluten.

I don't have terrible, immediate reactions to gluten. My reactions to maltodextrin are quite similar, but much STRONGER than my reactions to gluten.

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I was just diagnosised with celiacs this year, and just registered (glad to find this community) just to add my own experience - happened just this week again - mix powder drinks that have maltodextrin (whether we know/agree gluten free or not) it continue to cause me headache, stomach ache, and painful bloating within same day of consuming -- so for me, whatever the reason, maltodextrin is on my NO list -- and I've got to keep remembering to check mix drink powder labels.. New part of life. I am still getting used to it, and kicking myself HARD right now for not checking AGAIN.. THANK YOU for everyone's posts - they've been VERY helpful!

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I don't know how long it has been since you went gluten-free. You may still be in the healing process. During that phase, random reactions to anything are not unusual. Your body is still healing. During my early healing process, I reacted to even such simple things as plain rice.

In North America, maltodextrin is made from corn. If the source was wheat (it isn't) then the word "wheat" would appear on the product label, either in the ingredients or in a "contains" statement.

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I have to agree with Peter. Just because you react to something, does not mean it contains gluten. Your body when you first eliminate gluten is reaction-set to a lot of things. and will have abnormal reactions for a while. Just be patient and a lot of those reactions will go away. The ones that don't may indicate another food intolerance, which unfortunately happens quite offen in celiacs. Don't automatically accuse a company of making a gluten-contaminated product until your are sure of your reactions.

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Regardless of the maltodextrin or citric acid issues, Wal-mart brand kool-aid, and as far as I know the Crystal-lite wannabe's actually state that they are processed in plants that also produce wheat products. Also, many of the GV(Great Value)brands used to be gluten-free and then Wal-mart decided to go with different suppliers and requirements (basically, in my opinion, they sold out to the lowest bid) and now most of the Gv brands are no longer safe. I will say this though, they at least clearly state on their products if there is any threat of an allergen in the product.

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I abhor water. I grew up drinking spring water until I was 9. We then moved to town and I discovered what bad water is. To this day I won't drink anything that isn't in a bottle from a spring. (Arrowhead and Fiji mostly) The only thing that gets me near tap water is those packets. Sad to know I can't have them anymore. :( One more thing that goes from really really cheap to pricy or live without it.

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