0
stellar

Celiac Disease And Lymphoma

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

I have been having pain in my left groin and armpit, and a low grade fever/night sweats off and on. I am paranoid because I recently read an article about how Celiacs have an increased risk of developing lymphoma. I had a CT scan last week of my pelvic area and they "didn't find anything significant", but that was coming from the medical assistant since the doctor was out over the holidays. Also, not sure they can diagnose lymphoma by a CT scan anyway. At the onset of my symptoms I was told I had a slightly elevated white blood cell count... probably due to stress they said. But the same doctor sent me to therapy because they couldn't find anything wrong with me and thought I had generalized anxiety disorder :rolleyes: . Has anyone else had these symptoms or heard of the connection between the 2 diseases (celiac and lymphoma?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


There is a link. My mother died of lymphomia at 47, and I didn't figure out I had celiac till I was 48, so I freak out too. In her case she went to doctors for years with lymph problems. They kept telling her it was just a viral infection when they were probably missing signs of early lymphomia. I don't know if it can be easily diagnosed early or not. Once a doctor told me it could be with a blood test and tested me, but I think he was lying to put my mind at ease. Her early symptoms were swollen lymph nodes which are present in any infection so it was easily missed. I suggest you be insistent and ask lots of questions. Good luck. Hopefully it is just an infection.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a connection between celiac disease and lymphoma:

http://www.celiac.com/articles/1007/1/Celi...homa/Page1.html

Sjogren's Syndrome (an autoimmune disorder that clusters with celiac) also increases your risk of lymphoma. I've been reading about this lately because I've had a painless, swollen lymph node in my neck for more than two months... I have an appointment with an ENT on Tuesday. I'm hopeful that it's just an infection. I have good reasons to think that it is just an infection, but I'm also a bit worried because my platelets have been dropping lately.

There is a LOT of scary stuff on the Internet :( I think it's important to keep in mind that the symptoms of lymphoma can be caused by other things. For example...

Night sweats: could be a hormonal imbalance (early menopause)

Elevated WBC: bacterial infection

Low grade fever: lupus (which can also cause enlarged lymph nodes)

Enlarged lymph nodes: benign tumor, infection

Falling platelets: ITP (but you have to rule out scary stuff like lymphoma and leukemia)

I think you're smart not to assume this is just "stress." Try not to panic. :ph34r: (I'm telling myself this too). Lymphoma really is a rare disorder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My gastroenterologist told me that there was an increased risk of intestinal lymphoma with Celiac Disease. The test to ask for would be an Upper GI.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is an increased risk when we have not been diagnosed. One thing to help ease your mind a bit is that that risk drops for every year that you are gluten free. After I think it is 5 years with the gluten issues under control the risk is very close to the regular populations. They can biopsy the glands if needed to tell if lymphoma is present if the blood tests and other clinical signs point to it. Also once glands get swollen it can take a long time for them to go down. When I had active DH my glands in my neck and groin were always swollen and they were that way for many years. It took about a year for them to reduce. Try not to stress out too much about the risk but do be sure to get things checked.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


I agree--don't freak out. Do have it checked further.

But for the time being also consider natural remedies to turn things around like taking detox herbs for the liver, intestines and lymphs. That means dandelion or milk thistle (dandelion etc. for the liver--best to alternate these, one week on and then use the other herb the next, similar to the next "or's" I 'll list ahead), yellow dock or Oregon Grape Root (systemically good plus excellent for the intestines and helps out with the liver; both also have antimicrobial characteristics); and echinacea or cleavers (cleavers is the best lymphatic drain around; you might want to start with echinacea since its more gentle). Eating lots of parsley, broccoli and cabbage etc and other greens is excellent (necessary) too.

Barberry root taken now and then for a few days is excellent against both yeast and generalized microbial infections like in the lymphs. Oregano oil caps and enterically coated garlic are good too for this last. Oregano and garlic usually can be taken more regularly than the barberry.

Marshmallow root and slippery elm caps will help soothe and heal the villi, which may be the initial culprit in this matter.

Plus sauna, bentonite mud (Indian healing clay etc.) packs on hands and feet made mixed with a little apple cider vinegar in the water helps too.

And plenty of water...no alcohol and very little if any sugar. Use stevia as a sweetner whenever possible. NO artificial sweetners.

Also use digestive enzymes such as pancreatin and bromelain/papain, B complex, Vit. D and A preferably from fish oil.

Exercise regularly! Walk...! Etc. Work up a sweat daily!

Hope this helps! You don't have to be a passive victim and just wait for what may or may not happen. All the above is good for anyone, and it just might be necessary for you now. Think of it as a blessing, part of your spiritual path. You will probably end up healthier and more vibrant than most everyone else around you...

Bea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hope this helps! You don't have to be a passive victim and just wait for what may or may not happen. All the above is good for anyone, and it just might be necessary for you now. Think of it as a blessing, part of your spiritual path. You will probably end up healthier and more vibrant than most everyone else around you...

This is good advice :)

I'm already doing some of the things you mentioned... vitamin D (4000iu per day), fish oil, digestive enzymes (plus Betaine HCl)... I'm adding more garlic and dark green vegetables to my diet and I've cut way, WAY back on all processed foods and sugars. I love the sauna... I wish I had time to go more often.

What I'm wondering about is the herbs... are they safe to take while breastfeeding? I had a bad reaction to caprylic acid (chills, headache, swollen lymph nodes, achy feeling all over). After reading about how candida absorbs mercury, I'm a little worried to go messing around with the balance of flora in my body in any dramatic way :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also, not sure they can diagnose lymphoma by a CT scan anyway.

I've been told recently that they can't, but they can see abnormalities which might be a lymphoma, then investigate further. In my case, the radiologist saw a few things that didn't look quite normal in an abdominal CT scan, so my doctor consulted with Dr. Green in the Celiac Center at Columbia on how to proceed. What I was told was that they could use the biopsies preserved from my endoscopy + colonoscopy I had in November, and count the lymphocytes by type. Having a wide array of them is an indication that the body's natural defense mechanism is working normally. Having predominantly one type of the T-cell variety is an indication that it is running wild attacking the body, which is lymphoma, or cancer. (I'm not a doctor, this is simply what my notes say.)

Happily, I checked out okay, but they want to review things again after the inflammation in my jejunum has receded.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cancer can only survive on sugar. Humans can survive on other things.

.......your choice.

..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cancer can only survive on sugar. Humans can survive on other things.

I know this is your particular drumbeat...

http://junkfoodscience.blogspot.com/2008/0...use-cancer.html

I think yolo's suggestions are generally very healthy and consider the well-being of the whole person... physically, mentally, and spiritually.

Stress causes autoimmune disorders to flare... freaking out could really set me back :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


I know this is your particular drumbeat...

http://junkfoodscience.blogspot.com/2008/0...use-cancer.html

I think yolo's suggestions are generally very healthy and consider the well-being of the whole person... physically, mentally, and spiritually.

Stress causes autoimmune disorders to flare... freaking out could really set me back :)

Your website says the idea that sugar ingestion feeds cancer is just a baseless hoax, and offers as evidence an unrelated baseless hoax. This is not one of the other baseless hoaxes.

Your website claims there is no scientific evidence supporting the claim that sugar causes cancer.

Incorrect.

It's known as the Warburg effect, named after a Germany doctor who discovered it in the early 20th century. The reason it has had little (not "no") scientific study is that western governments refuse to approve any study which withholds sugar from cancer patients. .........as if withholding sugar from someone's diet would harm them. The only recent such study is:

http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,...1662484,00.html

It withheld sugar from patients with cancer so advanced that they had no hope of living. They replaced sugar with protein and oils. The result? Something like 80 percent of the participants' cancers stayed unchanged or their cancers went into remission. However, the study noted a very high dropout rate from people who could not adhere to a no-sugar diet.

Lessee .......I wonder what the source of resistance to this concept could be?

It's not like western oncologists don't know about this. The gold-standard method of finding cancer is a PET scan. The cancer patient is placed on a no-carb diet for 12 hours. Then a tech injects radioactive glucose, and takes an x-ray image. The glucose radiates in the places where the cancer consumes it.

I'd like to say this is all western medicine's fault, but it's not. Western medicine "treats" cancer only in ways demanded by its patients.

And your link is incorrect in stating that the body's sole method of feeding cells in the absence of ingested sugar is to manufacture sugar from other food. The body is quite happy converting fats and oils into ketones for consumption. In the absence of ingested sugar, the liver mitochondria convert amino acids into glucose for the few brain cells which have no mitochondrial capacity for consuming ketones. The process is regulated so that the blood contains only the amount of sugar needed by those cells.

..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK... so your "evidence" is a TIME magazine article about a scientific study that has not yet been peer-reviewed or published. Only seven people were willing to stick with the sugar-free diet and two of them still died. Have the other five people gone into remission? It's probably too early to tell. I'm no statistician, but I have to tell you that this study has some flaws...

1. The sample size is WAY too small to get any valuable data. Seven people is meaningless (when it comes to science... nothing against them personally)

2. It's not a random sample... you can't force people to stop eating sugar. I realize it might not be the end of the world (gluten-free is not... corn-free is not...), but if I knew I only had a few months left on earth I would NOT spend that time being somebody's guinea pig. This is a common problem with scientific studies involving people. The Nazis found a way around it... but that is not a model of research we should be emulating!!

As someone who has a PhD, I have to tell you that it takes a lot of intelligence, passion, and a bit of luck to finish a graduate degree... especially in the hard sciences. My guess is that a lot of oncologists and people who do cancer research have been personally affected by it. Don't you think they would do just about anything to find some answers?

Clearly, food affects our health. Not all doctors are good doctors. I have plenty of reasons not to trust them. BUT... I still trust the basic idea of medical research. Apparently, you do too if you're concerned about sources of evidence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Don't you think they would do just about anything to find some answers?

Do junkies choose life, or the next fix?

As evidenced by the Wurzberg study, against all logic, sadly the answer is "no". A very large percentage of people, especially people who's bodies produce cancer, choose death over sugar abstinance. For the medical establishment, the motives are acceptibility and profit motive ......because, for onlookers the motive is social paradigm .......food is what our mothers said food is ........well, our tasty selections from that list.

Historically, agricultural carbohydrates are the prime reason for social and political upheaval in expanding societies. As those societies age, agricultural carbohydrates weaken populations into ineffectiveness. Finally agricultural carbohydrates become responsible for the decline of those cultures.

I'm sorry your science won't stand up without starting a credentials challenge.

..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to all for your advice. I must say I was surprised on the amount of feedback I received! I'm so glad I found a place to vent and "talk" to people who understand what I'm going through.

Stellar :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is good advice :)

I'm already doing some of the things you mentioned... vitamin D (4000iu per day), fish oil, digestive enzymes (plus Betaine HCl)... I'm adding more garlic and dark green vegetables to my diet and I've cut way, WAY back on all processed foods and sugars. I love the sauna... I wish I had time to go more often.

What I'm wondering about is the herbs... are they safe to take while breastfeeding? I had a bad reaction to caprylic acid (chills, headache, swollen lymph nodes, achy feeling all over). After reading about how candida absorbs mercury, I'm a little worried to go messing around with the balance of flora in my body in any dramatic way :(

I'll look up the safety of dandelion and other of the heavy duty herbs as far as safety with breastfeeding. Wasn't thinking about that. However peppermint, chamomile are completely safe, as is marshmallow root and slippery elm.

If you have had a bad reaction to capryllic acid, it really would indicate to me you probably have a yeast/fungal/candida overgrowth or some such infection. One way to really check this is to go off all sugars and quickly digestible carbohydrates plus reduce carbs in general. If you go into withdrawal (become b%$@#y and upset etc. can't seem to function clearly etc.) then its very likely you have some kind of fungal/yeast thing. In this case you need to reduce your carbs and sugars drastically if you want to get rid of the inflammation in your nodes. You should expect some reaction to the die off for at least a week (maybe longer--esp,. if you can't take regular anti yeast products) but it will be worth it. Saunas and exercise can really help. Garlic yes: I don't know about oregano oil and breastfeeding. Enterically coated acidophilus should really help too... I used to use pao de arco but discovered its an immune stimulant, not the best thing for us with celiac.

And by the way, once you get a yeast infection, it often returns. It often requires a lifelong vigilance... Sorry!!

I forget, how old is your infant -- did you say?

Bea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'll look up the safety of dandelion and other of the heavy duty herbs as far as safety with breastfeeding. Wasn't thinking about that. However peppermint, chamomile are completely safe, as is marshmallow root and slippery elm.

If you have had a bad reaction to capryllic acid, it really would indicate to me you probably have a yeast/fungal/candida overgrowth or some such infection. One way to really check this is to go off all sugars and quickly digestible carbohydrates plus reduce carbs in general. If you go into withdrawal (become b%$@#y and upset etc. can't seem to function clearly etc.) then its very likely you have some kind of fungal/yeast thing. In this case you need to reduce your carbs and sugars drastically if you want to get rid of the inflammation in your nodes. You should expect some reaction to the die off for at least a week (maybe longer--esp,. if you can't take regular anti yeast products) but it will be worth it. Saunas and exercise can really help. Garlic yes: I don't know about oregano oil and breastfeeding. Enterically coated acidophilus should really help too... I used to use pao de arco but discovered its an immune stimulant, not the best thing for us with celiac.

And by the way, once you get a yeast infection, it often returns. It often requires a lifelong vigilance... Sorry!!

I forget, how old is your infant -- did you say?

Bea

Thanks for getting back to me!

My son is ten months old... I suspect he'll be breastfeeding for at least another year.

Last month I had a biopsy for an itchy (gluten-enhanced) rash that I thought was DH, but the results came back as "acute dermatitis"... I found a definition that said it's "a rash caused by inflammation somewhere else in the body, often in the presence of a fungal infection." I also have yeast overgrowth on my scalp... my dermatologist gave me a prescription shampoo for it. <_< I've been SUPER cautious about gluten and corn for the last month, which has helped. Now that the holidays are over I've sharply reduced the amount of processed (and moldy/yeasty/sugary) foods in my diet, although my birthday is on Tuesday and I'm planning to have a little dark chocolate :P

Should I be taking something to kill off the yeast/infection? :unsure: I was only taking two capsules of caprylic acid per day and the reaction was BAD. I don't think I can handle a week of feeling like I have the flu. Not with a new semester starting, food to cook, two small children to take care of, and a husband who means well but is not always helpful.

I actually feel pretty good... the swollen lymph node scares me a little (and I am getting it checked out), but as long as I'm not endangering my health I would prefer to take a slow and steady approach :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cancer can only survive on sugar. Humans can survive on other things.

.......your choice.

Even in the highly dubious "evidence" you present, there's nothing that claims cancer can survive ONLY on sugar. And even the researchers who seem to think they're on to something admit that getting off sugar is no miracle cure.

richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Even in the highly dubious "evidence" you present, there's nothing that claims cancer can survive ONLY on sugar.

Incorrect.

http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,...1662484,00.html

From the article I linked:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

........In 1924, the German Nobel laureate Otto Warburg first published his observations of a common feature he saw in fast-growing tumors: unlike healthy cells, which generate energy by metabolizing sugar in their mitochondria, cancer cells appeared to fuel themselves exclusively through glycolysis, a less-efficient means of creating energy through the fermentation of sugar in the cytoplasm........

.........The theory is simple: If most aggressive cancers rely on the fermentation of sugar for growing and dividing, then take away the sugar and they should stop spreading. Meanwhile, normal body and brain cells should be able to handle the sugar starvation; they can switch to generating energy from fatty molecules called ketone bodies

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for getting back to me!

My son is ten months old... I suspect he'll be breastfeeding for at least another year.

Last month I had a biopsy for an itchy (gluten-enhanced) rash that I thought was DH, but the results came back as "acute dermatitis"... I found a definition that said it's "a rash caused by inflammation somewhere else in the body, often in the presence of a fungal infection." I also have yeast overgrowth on my scalp... my dermatologist gave me a prescription shampoo for it. <_< I've been SUPER cautious about gluten and corn for the last month, which has helped. Now that the holidays are over I've sharply reduced the amount of processed (and moldy/yeasty/sugary) foods in my diet, although my birthday is on Tuesday and I'm planning to have a little dark chocolate :P

Should I be taking something to kill off the yeast/infection? :unsure: I was only taking two capsules of caprylic acid per day and the reaction was BAD. I don't think I can handle a week of feeling like I have the flu. Not with a new semester starting, food to cook, two small children to take care of, and a husband who means well but is not always helpful.

I actually feel pretty good... the swollen lymph node scares me a little (and I am getting it checked out), but as long as I'm not endangering my health I would prefer to take a slow and steady approach :)

You can go real slow to get rid of the fungal infection. I totally understand. It can make you crazy going through that die quick off. It may take forever but eventually you will get there. Just do the enterically coated acidophilus and enterically coated garlic perhaps and maybe oregano or thyme oil that you rub on your wrists and lymph points (those things!!) now an then (though again we need to check on the infant thing on this too...). And just do the no sugar, low or no quick carb. diet.

I honestly think the lymph problems you are having are a result of the yeast/fungal infection. To help your system along, eat lots of fresh parsley and coriander as well as lots of fresh greens in general. Celery is great too. The saunas are a good idea...plus exercise! And lots and lots of water...

Still haven't had a chance to look up the liver and lymph herbs and babies yet. But will do so soon. Just have been swamped of late...

Bea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A little update...

On Thursday I had a biopsy of that lymph node. It's not lymphoma! :D :D :D It's not any kind of malignancy at all. They did see some macrophages... so it looks like some kind of infection. Hopefully it will go away on the broad-spectrum antibiotic I'm taking. Not thrilled about antibiotics... but I'm taking probiotics in between doses and going VERY easy on the sugars/fruits (plus no yeasty/moldy foods).

What a HUGE relief. :ph34r:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


Mother of Jibril---

I am so happy for you! I was thinking about you a lot. I know that must have be scary for you to have to make that wait. Waiting is the hardest part!

I didn't want to write before since you weren't sure and didn't have a clear diagnosis. I was nervous when you mentioned the elevated white count. A CBC w/platelet differencial is a blood test that my drs used in the past with me.

I am a leukemia/lymphoma survivor and I do believe that the link with our disease is there. I do not have any scientific evidence to offer, only that each person in my family that display's gluten symptoms has also had some form of cancer.

So glad for your good news-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A little update...

What good news!! Thank goodness :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mother of Jibril---

I am so happy for you! I was thinking about you a lot. I know that must have be scary for you to have to make that wait. Waiting is the hardest part!

I didn't want to write before since you weren't sure and didn't have a clear diagnosis. I was nervous when you mentioned the elevated white count. A CBC w/platelet differencial is a blood test that my drs used in the past with me.

I am a leukemia/lymphoma survivor and I do believe that the link with our disease is there. I do not have any scientific evidence to offer, only that each person in my family that display's gluten symptoms has also had some form of cancer.

So glad for your good news-

Thank you for thinking of me! Thanks to Patti too :)

I agree with you about the general link to cancer. My dad's family has been plagued with it. Two siblings (out of eight) have died from breast cancer, one when she was only 29. Her two kids were just a little bit older than mine are right now. I've been thinking about her a lot. I also think about her daughter, who was a year younger than me and committed suicide in her 20s. Depression and alcoholism run in the family too... more signs of gluten intolerance, I imagine.

Last week it occured to me that I could get past records of CBCs from my OB's office. It turns out that my WBC and platelets have been all over the place the last few years... sometimes up (out of range), sometimes down. It will be interesting to see what happens now that I'm not constantly inflamed from eating gluten and corn.

Congratulations on your own survival!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is great news! What a relief!

Do you know what kind of infection, bacterial or yeast?

Also, if bacterial, be certain to do anticandida stuff afterwards to counteract the effect of the antibiotics. Candida is opportunistic and will likely flourish with the antibiotics. A good enteric coated acidophilus is de riguer.

Bea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OMG - YES Lymphoma and Celiac can be related.

Please stay on the gluten free diet if you have Celiac. My husband was diagnosed with Celiac in Dec. 2002, in Feb. 2003 he was diagnosed with lymphoma after a bowel perforation and died in March 2003 - only 11 days later.

My husband saw many doctors for over a year and no one found out that he had Celiac or lymphoma until it was too late. Also my DH - Bob had just turned 41 years old.

My DS was diagnosed at age 9, having Celiac

My DD was diagnosed at age 4, Having Celiac.

My kids are now 15 and 9 and doing very well. They are well Aware that they should not CHEAT.

Good luck to all.

Dawn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
0

  • Who's Online   1 Member, 0 Anonymous, 270 Guests (See full list)

  • Top Posters +

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/23/2018 - If you’re looking for a great gluten-free Mexican-style favorite that is sure to be a big hit at dinner or at your next potluck, try these green chili enchiladas with roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for chicken, but they are just as delicious when made vegetarian using just the roasted cauliflower. Either way, these enchiladas will disappear fast. Roasted cauliflower gives these green chili chicken enchiladas a deep, smokey flavor that diners are sure to love.
    Ingredients:
    2 cans gluten-free green chili enchilada sauce (I use Hatch brand) 1 small head cauliflower, roasted and chopped 6 ounces chicken meat, browned ½ cup cotija cheese, crumbled ½ cup queso fresco, diced 1 medium onion, diced ⅓ cup green onions, minced ¼ cup radishes, sliced 1 tablespoon cooking oil 1 cup chopped cabbage, for serving ½ cup sliced cherry or grape tomatoes, for serving ¼ cup cilantro, chopped 1 dozen fresh corn tortillas  ⅔ cup oil, for softening tortillas 1 large avocado, cut into small chunks Note: For a tasty vegetarian version, just omit the chicken, double the roasted cauliflower, and prepare according to directions.
    Directions:
    Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a cast iron or ovenproof pan until hot.
    Add chicken and brown lightly on both sides. 
    Remove chicken to paper towels to cool.
     
    Cut cauliflower into small pieces and place in the oiled pan.
    Roast in oven at 350F until browned on both sides.
    Remove from the oven when tender. 
    Allow roasted cauliflower to cool.
    Chop cauliflower, or break into small pieces and set aside.
    Chop cooled chicken and set aside.
    Heat 1 inch of cooking oil in a small frying pan.
    When oil is hot, use a spatula to submerge a tortilla in the oil and leave only long enough to soften, about 10 seconds or so. 
    Remove soft tortilla to a paper towel and repeat with remaining tortillas.
    Pour enough enchilada sauce to coat the bottom of a large casserole pan.
    Dunk a tortilla into the sauce and cover both sides. Add more sauce as needed.
    Fill each tortilla with bits of chicken, cauliflower, onion, and queso fresco, and roll into shape.
    When pan is full of rolled enchiladas, top with remaining sauce.
    Cook at 350F until sauce bubbles.
    Remove and top with fresh cotija cheese and scallions.
    Serve with rice, beans, and cabbage, and garnish with avocado, cilantro, and sliced grape tomatoes.

     

    Roxanne Bracknell
    Celiac.com 06/22/2018 - The rise of food allergies means that many people are avoiding gluten in recent times. In fact, the number of Americans who have stopped eating gluten has tripled in eight years between 2009 and 2017.
    Whatever your rationale for avoiding gluten, whether its celiac disease, a sensitivity to the protein, or any other reason, it can be really hard to find suitable places to eat out. When you’re on holiday in a new and unknown environment, this can be near impossible. As awareness of celiac disease grows around the world, however, more and more cities are opening their doors to gluten-free lifestyles, none more so than the 10 locations on the list below.
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the U.S is a hotbed of gluten-free options, with four cities making the top 10, as well as the Hawaiian island of Maui. Chicago, in particular, is a real haven of gluten-free fare, with 240 coeliac-safe eateries throughout this huge city. The super hip city of Portland also ranks highly on this list, with the capital of counterculture rich in gluten-free cuisine, with San Francisco and Denver also included. Outside of the states, several prominent European capitals also rank very highly on the list, including Prague, the picturesque and historic capital of the Czech Republic, which boasts the best-reviewed restaurants on this list.
    The Irish capital of Dublin, meanwhile, has the most gluten-free establishments, with a huge 330 to choose from, while Amsterdam and Barcelona also feature prominently thanks to their variety of top-notch gluten-free fodder.
    Finally, a special mention must go to Auckland, the sole representative of Australasia in this list, with the largest city in New Zealand rounding out the top 10 thanks to its 180 coeliacsafe eateries.
    The full top ten gluten-free cities are shown in the graphic below:
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      110,276
    • Total Posts
      949,866
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      77,907
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    Allison Coldwell
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Dear Cyclinglady,   thank you for your help. Yes, I am trying to find out what my underlying condition is. But the doctors don’t help at all (insurance can’t be an issu since I have ful insurance). But they closed my case with the diagnosis: nonfunctional LES with constant taking of ppis for a lifetime. But ppis are making my problems even bigger so I trying to fing out what is happening. I’ve been convincing them to test me for celiac disease and because the result was negative (only IGA testing) they ruled it out. All I have is low vitamin d, low iron, same problems as before taking ppis, nausea with ppis, still bloating with gases and burping. Ppi works only 12 hours - the biggest dose. After 12 hours burping brings more acid to my esophagus. All that doctors say is that ppis should work and don’t believe me that in my case ppis are working just half of the time. I tried to take half dose in the morning and half in the evening but half dose helps only for 6 hours. So their suggestion is: take more ppis and another medicine for motility. and case closed for them letting me desperate and completely lost. Any help appreciated, Aya  
    • Posterboy, thank you sooooo much. I can’t tell you how greatful I am for your long and detailed answer. I have many additional questions (I asked you few more additional questions in my other post about celiac and reflux) I am just trying to find my underlying condition. I am afraid I’ll have to stay with ppi for two additional months, since I have esophagitis grade b, confirmed with biopsy a week ago. It was first time that I have inflamed esophagus. Last endoscopies showed only nonfunctional LES. I think this inflamarion is because od a panic attack after drinking coffee with a lot of sugar and nausea after that. Some coffees make me sick and some don’t. I would just like to find out what relaxes my LES and what is my underlying condition.  Ppis obviously don’t help, since my problema with bloating and gases and reflux are continuing. Stomach hurts when is empty. And I have huge amount of gases 1 hour after eating and during the night 4-6 hours after last meal. Please if you have any additional idea what could it be, tell me!!! Best, aya
    • Oh, wow, thanks, I was told by my doctor that I had the "full" panel but I guess not. Unfortunately I have the type of insurance that means I have to see her again before I can do anything else and she is out on vacation until July 10 so there is almost no point in trying to make another appointment before the specialist one. I doubt urgent care would do it?
    • Thank you all for your help!!! It’s a bit clearer now.  I had problems with gases and bloating and reflux a year ago and doc prescribed Lansoprazol. He said my lower esophageal sphiincter doesn’ t work properly.  I was taking lansoprazol 30mg for half a year with huge problems with nausea and even more bloating. Than I lowered the dose to 15 for next half a year and felt better and than stopped taking them. I’ve been off for a months when I started noticing numb tongue and reflux again. So I started taking ppi again. And it’s worse again. I know I have to stop using ppi, but I think I have underlying condition that is making my bloating and reflux and I have to solve it first so that reflux, which is my biggest concern, will go away. I have been anemic long years before taking ppi, now I have low vitamin d, and quite high result IGA 16 (celiac is >20). Can be reason for low vitamin d in ppi too or is more likely because of celiac? Doctors don’t want to make any additional test because they say celiac disease can’t be the reason since this test is negative. And so I am still searching what could be my primary problem. They just want to operate my LES and that’s it for them. But I know this won’t solve my problem since the reason has to be somewhere else. The problem is that the highest dose of lansoprazole is helping me for 12 hours and not 24 like it should. It’s just making my nausea worse and doesn’t help like it should I get bloated with reflux gases, burping 1 hour after eating. My last meal of the day is at 8 p.m. And the worst reflux attac is usually around midnight and 1 a.m. Aya
    • The full celiac panel includes: TTG IGA
      TTG IGG
      DGP IGA
      DGP IGG
      EMA
      IGA A positive on any one blood test should lead to a gastroenterologist doing an endoscopy /biopsies to see if you have celiac. It looks like you are missing the DGP tests. Perhaps you can get them done while you are waiting for your gastro appointment. You could possibly have a more definitive result from them.  
  • Blog Entries

  • Upcoming Events