Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest Viola

Gluten Free Wheat Bread?

Recommended Posts

Guest Viola

I just got this from the Celiac Canada post.

From LifeScript Healthy News Bites:

Gluten Free Bread May be On the Horizon - 04/01/05

Sufferers of celiac disease, the condition that prevents many from consuming wheat and other grains, may finally be able to enjoy toast with their morning coffee. Researchers at the University of Oslo, Norway, recently located the proteins responsible for gluten intolerance and are in the process of identifying gluten-gree wheat strains. One such wheat, known as einkorn, has been used to make breads for centuries in the Middle East and parts of Europe. Though einkorn and other gluten-gree wheats currently remain too difficult to harvest widely, the research teams involved in the celiac study believe that breeding einkorn with more stable wheat strains could result in a "high quality" gluten-free bread in the near future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


Thank's Shirley. I would love a good piece of bread. When I went to the celiac conference at Stanford University in October there was a company named I can eat that. They had the best bread and pizza crust. I guess they don't sell it by mail but there are some stores in the bay area that have it. The following stores are carrying it. (I wish they sold it by me!) I think the web site is Icaneatthat@comcast.net

Sally

Dear "I Can Eat That" Customers,

We are very pleased to announce the introduction of The

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest BellyTimber

- was either of these extracts published on April 1st?

- will it end up utterly gluten-free or only low gluten?

- in any event it won't be any use to considerable numbers of people with celiac disease who, like me, are wheat intolerant per se.

Wheat is one of the gluten containing grains. So don't eat wheat. This craze for manufacturing low gluten wheat or (reportedly) growing it is astounding.

Surely it can't be cheaper - or more money-making - to go through all this jiggery pokery than to grow some rice, millet, tapioca and all the other things - all of which are good for non-celiacs - all of which are good for everybody - they have a 100% market, in every country.

If you are one of that profile of celiac disease which is not intolerant to the fibre, starch etc of wheat - which it is notnatural to isolate - then like everyone you decide what's OK for you. Personally some of you have spent the last month repeatedly telling me on this forum to not consider my position freakish and embrace my proper diet wholeheartedly. On it hinges my economic wellbeing as professional weakness has meant I probably shan't have a suitable medical certificate as a backstop, namely I eat successfully or sink. Some of you told me to consider my old diet out of line and since then when I bungle and eat some, it tastes like a piece of wood.

What disturbs me is the propaganda which is not sincere. Can any of you figure out the motives of the dealings of companies and organisations towards us in this gluten-crazed society? On commercial diversity my long term wellbeing depends. :huh::o<_<:angry::(:unsure::blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest BellyTimber

Clarification: I don't mean don't eat wheat if you're sure it's good for you, I meant before this jiggery pokery.

We are a diverse group and have different profiles - another one is the with/without oats (avenin) - I go without (regardless of the contamination issue).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't have wheat at all. It is a grass, and I react badly to grasses, including rice. Instead of spending all that money trying to grow a gluten-free wheat, why don't they just put it into harvesting oats by hand, and avoiding contamination of them, so that celiacs that can tolerate oats can have them? I do miss bread, but not bad enough to pay as much as it will cost, and to risk the cross-contamination!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with the above. I ate a piece of bread a few months ago, I just wanted a good sandwich. Needlesss to say I got very ill and it's not worth that. The other strange thing I noticed is the bread didn't taste as good as it used to? I won't be eating it again!

Sally

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Clarification: I don't mean don't eat wheat if you're sure it's good for you, I meant before this jiggery pokery.

But actually, wheat isn't good for anyone! It does have some nutritional value, but the human species developed for a long time without eating wheat. Wheat was introduced to our diet in the form of rewards. given by the Romans and the Greeks, who got it from the east, then other places as well. The point, though, is that by the time we were exposed to it, we had developed so much that our digestive symptoms were not supposed to even have it. While rice is fully digested, 10% of some of the other gluten-containing grains can't be digested.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Viola

Michael, it is dated the first isn't it :o Makes one wonder, I would have thought the Celiac list should have checked for April fools though.

I'm not too worried about getting wheat back in the diet anyway. One does just fine without it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree with the above. I ate a piece of bread a few months ago, I just wanted a good sandwich. Needlesss to say I got very ill and it's not worth that. The other strange thing I noticed is the bread didn't taste as good as it used to? I won't be eating it again!

Sally

The bread didn't taste as good? Is it possible that the longer we go without it, the more we lose our taste for it? I have heard my dad say that is what happened to him with cigarettes. If that is so, how long will it take before I no longer crave Oreos?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it might be true, we get used to eating more natural foods then the wheat or gluten ones don't taste so good.

I really don't crave cookies anymore. it might be that or I just figured it's not worth the price I will pay.

I have been craving donuts, but that might be because people have been eating tham at work?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites