Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

turbo

Key Symptom Differences Between Wheat Intolerance And Celiac?

Recommended Posts

As I wait for my blood test results, I was wondering:

What are the key symptom differences between wheat intolerance and Celiac?

My symptoms that I suspect may relate (maybe some aren't relevant) are:

Fatigue

Brain Fog (worst right after large wheat meals)

Headache after wheat meals

Irritability

Arthritis (since age 14)

Epididymitis (Since age ~20)

Wheat Digestion issues (though not as severe as some people's gastro issues on here)

Geographic Tongue

Are any of these specific to Celiac or could they simply be wheat intolerance?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


Here is my understanding, I hope I'm explaining it correctly:

To be certain about a diagnosis, you probably should get the biopsy done rather than just relying on blood work. The biopsy samples will be evaluated on the Marsh classification scale, which rates the level damage to the intestinal villi. There is a level of damage that must be present for it to be considered celiac disease.

However, some doctors think that "non-celiac gluten intolerance" IS actually celiac disease where the visible damage is not severe enough to meet the criteria. The problem with lowering the criteria is that, the more sensitive you make a medical test, the higher risk you have of getting false positives through that test.

That said, there is still also the possibility that there is indeed a form of gluten intolerance that is not related to celiac disease. This is still a field that is not entirely understood. (Fortunately, though, it's being thoroughly studied by quite a few people now!)

Many people would agree that there are no "typical" celiac symptoms. Many of the things you're describing do have a known link to celiac disease, but until the difference (if there is one) is better understood, we can't know if other forms of gluten intolerance might cause these too. Definitely share your concerns and questions with your doctor, and do all you can to educate yourself as well. If you do think there is a need for further testing, definitely talk to your doctor about that as well.

Hope this helps!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What are the key symptom differences between wheat intolerance and Celiac?

I don't know the answer but I would really like to know for sure.


May 2009: IgG abnormal (not tested for full panel)

Sept 2009: Negative blood tests (I was on and off gluten)

Sept 21 2009: gluten free

Sept 21 2011: gluten free for 2 full years

Dec 2012: chronic fatigue and leaky gut.

Feb 2012: IgG reactions to almond, amaranth, sesame, sunflower, dairy, eggs, beans and of course gluten.

March 2012: modified GAPS diet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found this website: http://www.wheat-free.org/wheat-allergy.html

I copy pasted the symptoms:

Symptoms of a wheat allergy or wheat intolerance (not exhaustive by any means):

Arthritis

Bloated stomach

Chest pains

Depression or mood swings

Diarrhoea

Eczema

Feeling dizzy or faint

Joint and muscle aches and pains

Nausea or vomiting

Palpitations

Psoriasis

Skin rashes

Sneezing

Suspected irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)/similar effects

Swollen throat or tongue

Tiredness and lethargy

Unexplained cough

Unexplained runny nose

Watery or itchy eyes

Coeliac/celiac disease symptoms:

Anaemia

Bloating

Chronic tiredness

Constipation

Dermatitis herpetiformis

Diarrhoea

Irritable bowel

Migraines

Mouth ulcers

Psychological issues (stress, nerves, depression etc)

Severe weight loss

Vomiting

(From what I read on celiac.com, the celiac symptoms quoted above don't seem complete).


May 2009: IgG abnormal (not tested for full panel)

Sept 2009: Negative blood tests (I was on and off gluten)

Sept 21 2009: gluten free

Sept 21 2011: gluten free for 2 full years

Dec 2012: chronic fatigue and leaky gut.

Feb 2012: IgG reactions to almond, amaranth, sesame, sunflower, dairy, eggs, beans and of course gluten.

March 2012: modified GAPS diet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't it also when the symptoms start that makes the difference?

In my understanding, celiac disease is more of an allergy therefore the body would react as soon as it has entered the mouth, infact just any contact via skin or whatever will trigger the symptoms.

Intolerance is when your body reacts when digested, so safely passing through the mouth and throat. Cos I am intolerant and I enjoy the taste of gluten products but as soon as they hit the digestive system, things start turning upside down.

Plus the severety differs also.

Celiac can be fatal since it is an allergic reaction thereby there is a possibility you can die direct from it.

Whereas although intolerance can be severe, normally it is not fatal and does not cause direct death.

Hope this helps and good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In my understanding, celiac disease is more of an allergy therefore the body would react as soon as it has entered the mouth, infact just any contact via skin or whatever will trigger the symptoms.

um sorry, you have it backwards, Celiac is not an allergy, rather an autoimmune disorder and an intolerance, some sort of digestion/absorption of gluten is required and depending on the person, symptoms may not be immediately noticeable and can take up to 24 hours or more to materialize.

Celiac can be fatal since it is an allergic reaction thereby there is a possibility you can die direct from it.

people can and do die from Celiac related conditions (cancer, malnutrition etc) but they do not "die direct from it". Celiac also tends to build up over time and it can take years before you are aware of any problems

Allergy has an immediate histamine response that can be induced by simple contact or inhaling of the offending substance, if your reaction is severe enough an anaphylactic <sp?> reaction can cause death within minutes.


Enterolab:

Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA 11 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA 18 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score <300 Units (Normal Range <300 Units)

Fecal Anti-casein (cow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites