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Gfresh404

Thinking About Seeing A Psychologist..

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I was just wondering if anyone had to or wanted to see a psychologist or a counselor after being diagnosed? And if so, did it help?

I only know of one other person on the forums, who, like me, suffers from post dramatic stress disorder. I was wondering if anyone else felt the same way. I have only been gluten-free for 6 months and I have noticed improvements. I am active and do my best to focus on the positive. But I always feel there's this void, that my entire childhood is missing, even when I am happy I still feel this way; I think: "I could have been this happy all the time."

I have yet to do many of the things I wanted to do, and I blame almost all of it on celiac. I'm 19 and haven't even kissed a girl yet. I have no issues talking to girls, some of my best friends are girls, I was just never able to mentally and physically connect with them since I was never consistently the same person if that makes sense: basically I was very moody. I didn't even know who I was a lot of the time. It's like I never felt I was ready for a relationship because I always had some issues I had to take care of. And now that I can do all the things I wanted to, I almost feel as if it is too late.

Does anyone else feel this way? Or does anyone have any advice?

Sorry for the slight rant, but it helps to get it off my chest and somewhat out in the open.

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I think that if talking to someone will help you then find someone. Try not to focus on what you could have done, instead focus on all the things you can do and will! I know from experience that it is easy to focus on all the negative my husband is right now. He is trying to deal with it. Surround yourself with positive people and experience new things together. If you are feeling well now, don't let life pass you by, enjoy it! :)

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I was just wondering if anyone had to or wanted to see a psychologist or a counselor after being diagnosed? And if so, did it help?

I only know of one other person on the forums, who, like me, suffers from post dramatic stress disorder. I was wondering if anyone else felt the same way. I have only been gluten-free for 6 months and I have noticed improvements. I am active and do my best to focus on the positive. But I always feel there's this void, that my entire childhood is missing, even when I am happy I still feel this way; I think: "I could have been this happy all the time."

I have yet to do many of the things I wanted to do, and I blame almost all of it on celiac. I'm 19 and haven't even kissed a girl yet. I have no issues talking to girls, some of my best friends are girls, I was just never able to mentally and physically connect with them since I was never consistently the same person if that makes sense: basically I was very moody. I didn't even know who I was a lot of the time. It's like I never felt I was ready for a relationship because I always had some issues I had to take care of. And now that I can do all the things I wanted to, I almost feel as if it is too late.

Does anyone else feel this way? Or does anyone have any advice?

Sorry for the slight rant, but it helps to get it off my chest and somewhat out in the open.

Hi: (and so sorry you are feeling a bit lost). To take your questions in order....

If this is the way you are feeling, it could well be worth your while to go this route. A good listening ear and feedback its worth its weight in gold if you find the right person.

It sounds like you are still going through the grieving process of celiac, what you are missing now, and what might have been if you did not have it. A counselor could help you get over this hump; the letting go of what might have been and the focusing on the here and now, and also the acceptance of what is and moving forward, rather than looking back. All is not lost; you are very young, albeit at an age where everything takes on heightened meaning and significance, the age of discovery of a new self even if you are not gluten free. You just have this added impediment to finding your way in the adult world by having to find your way in your different lifestyle to boot!! It can be very confusing.

Many of us have big voids where our happy childhoods should have been, for a variety of reasons, but we can't afford to mess up the rest of our lives by spending the years grieving over what might have been. Yes, I agree, it would have been wonderful to have a happy childhood, but I didn't :( l and apparently you didn't. So what?? Do I want to have an unhappy adulthood too, even though I have been handed the key to open the door and walk through? Well, no, I don't think so. And do you want to? I don't think so. So if a counselor is what it takes to walk through that door, go for it.

You are at the age where we all "find" ourselves'; there are those who do it easily and fluidly, and there are those of us who need a flashlight and a guiding light. You sound to me like you need someone to validate you, and that person could well be a counselor. Go and find that guiding light and achieve your potential. It is never too late--you can walk through that door....

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I think this is a good idea. If the first one you see doen't now seem a good fit don't give up just ask for a referral to different one. I have PTSD to the point where I am virtually agoraphbic. While celiac did excaberate the issues they do stem from other issues as well. I am early into treatment, my experience with doctors has left me very distrusting of them so it was a hard step to take but it does seem to be helping. They may want to put you on an antiaxiety med, some are more effective than others. It took a trial of 3 different meds before they found one that helps. Psychotherapy can be a long process but it may help a great deal so don't give up.

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I was just wondering if anyone had to or wanted to see a psychologist or a counselor after being diagnosed? And if so, did it help?

I only know of one other person on the forums, who, like me, suffers from post dramatic stress disorder. I was wondering if anyone else felt the same way. I have only been gluten-free for 6 months and I have noticed improvements. I am active and do my best to focus on the positive. But I always feel there's this void, that my entire childhood is missing, even when I am happy I still feel this way; I think: "I could have been this happy all the time."

I have yet to do many of the things I wanted to do, and I blame almost all of it on celiac. I'm 19 and haven't even kissed a girl yet. I have no issues talking to girls, some of my best friends are girls, I was just never able to mentally and physically connect with them since I was never consistently the same person if that makes sense: basically I was very moody. I didn't even know who I was a lot of the time. It's like I never felt I was ready for a relationship because I always had some issues I had to take care of. And now that I can do all the things I wanted to, I almost feel as if it is too late.

Does anyone else feel this way? Or does anyone have any advice?

Sorry for the slight rant, but it helps to get it off my chest and somewhat out in the open.

So I don't know if this will help or not, but I got diagnosed about 2 months ago, am 23, and have recently thought about seeking some sort of psychologist or support group. The diagnosis for celiac hit me really hard and in the last two months I have had the worst immune system ever, to the point of being in the doctors office 1-3 times a week due to something else, as well as being on hand fulls of viamins and pills to heal my deficiencies as well as the other things that trailed along. Everytime I look forward to a concert or fun weekend, I get sick and nausious (not due to food, but vitamins from the doctor). I kinda feel like my world fell apart and I don't know how to pick up the pieces. I have almost been married for a year and find myself feeling guilty that my husband has to go through all the emotional ups and downs that I've been struggling with on top of all the medical issues. Between working full time, going to the doctors, making all food that I eat, and still keeping up with a house and being a wife I'm about at my breaking point. I feel like I woke up in a foreign body and have no idea how to get control back over my life. While I have not struggled with this since childhood, I still feel like a part of life has been stolen from me. Not just the last few years, but the future things I had planned on doing. Sorry for the little blurb, but the more I think about it the more I think that talking to either a psychologist or someone who actually really understands would be good. I am a firm believer in psychology since I am a psychology major so maybe I will go as well.

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as well as being on hand fulls of viamins and pills to heal my deficiencies as well as the other things that trailed along. Everytime I look forward to a concert or fun weekend, I get sick and nausious (not due to food, but vitamins from the doctor).

Labeling laws for supplements and scripts are very lax when it comes to gluten. Please make sure you are checking with the makers and your pharmacist to be absolutely sure they are really gluten free as you doctor will have no idea if they are or not.

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Let me first say that I completely feel that counseling can be beneficial in any situation where there is a "life changing" event or something that causes great stress and grief in your life. that is a very personal decision, and i really believe that talking to someone can only help... i really doubt that there could be any negative results.

with that being said, please understand that you are not alone. i am going on 32 years old and i was diagnosed about a year and a half ago. i recall being sick all the time from when i was 16 years old... was misdiagnosed and treated for years for crohn's disease, but things were never quite right. i do feel that there was a huge impact on my life through those years... i was always afraid to do certain things where i had to spend lots of hours where there was not easy bathroom access, especially first thing in the morning. i avoided lots of social things during the early years when i was the sickest. on top of that though... i am also gay, and had to struggle with my sexuality during these years. being a symptomatic celiac, my growth and development was severely impacted. i graduated from high school at 5'1" and didn't really hit puberty until right around then. because of this delayed development, my sexual "awakening" didn't really happen until after that. my point is this - there are definitely things that i look back on and wish i could have done differently during the time i was sick. however, i feel that i always made the best of everything, and stayed true to myself and what i was comfortable with. i fixated on things i could control... like academics (i was valedictorian of my HS) and sports (i've played every sport at one time or another, but worked my way up to a semi-pro level in beach volleyball). things have a way of working themselves out. i had two major struggles between my health and my sexuality, but i took it all in stride... and now that i was diagnosed and am feeling the best i have in years, i am happier in my life than i've ever been

i know this rant when on a bit, but i want you to understand that while everything we go through in life will form who we are today.... it doesn't always have to dictate who you want to be or will be in the future. that's always your decision.

best of luck to you Gfresh, i know it's rough, but at least you've crossed the hurdle to feeling healthy again.

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All is not lost; you are very young, albeit at an age where everything takes on heightened meaning and significance, the age of discovery of a new self even if you are not gluten free. You just have this added impediment to finding your way in the adult world by having to find your way in your different lifestyle to boot!! It can be very confusing.

You are at the age where we all "find" ourselves'; there are those who do it easily and fluidly, and there are those of us who need a flashlight and a guiding light. You sound to me like you need someone to validate you, and that person could well be a counselor.

Thank you for your reply. I think you hit the head of nail. Especially these two parts. My parents and a few others have said the exact same thing. I don't think I trust myself anymore because if I "thought" I was fine all this time and I really was not, well how could I trust myself again right away?

The whole thing about finding myself is very true too. I do not feel so much as confused but more just have a feeling of being constantly lost. Like I thought this was what life is and I was wrong. The quality of life is 10 times better than that of the quality that I used to be living at.

And to everyone else thank you for your replies as well, it is always comforting to know that I am not alone because most of the time I forget that there are people out there just like me. And I have to keep reminding myself that just because I have yet to meet anyone like myself in real life, that does not mean you are not out there. So thank you.

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I'm a 24 year old girl and I feel the same way when it comes to relationships. I've had them, but I feel like I've missed out on a lot of opportunities because I wasn't diagnosed until a few months ago. Dating and all that while suffering from all the symptoms...not easy. But I try to think about all the things I have gained from being sick. Going through celiac has put me through a lot of situations people my age don't yet understand. I'm the only one I know who's exstatic I can go to college, because before there was no way I was well enough to go. I think now would be the perfect time for you to go and talk to someone, and I think you should look around until you find someone you are comfortable with.

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I've had them, but I feel like I've missed out on a lot of opportunities because I wasn't diagnosed until a few months ago. Dating and all that while suffering from all the symptoms...not easy. But I try to think about all the things I have gained from being sick. Going through celiac has put me through a lot of situations people my age don't yet understand.

I never had any "official" relationships but I sometimes felt as if I was the boyfriend. I think I was afraid of commitment because I knew I wouldn't be able to be there all the time when they needed me. And it might sound stupid but not having that physical aspect and physical connection, I am feeling left with a void. Unfortunately I live in a small town and am close with a lot of girls I would like move on but of course they all have boyfriends. So I feel like I missed my chance.

It is probably better not to think about it, but it is really hard sometimes.

I am also the exact same with the age thing. Maybe this is just the way I am but I also feel a lot older than I really am (19). It's almost as if living with gluten sensitivity has made stronger. The only thing I fear now is dying alone. Death in of itself does not frighten me. Maybe I just don't have enough to lose at this point to care. I know things will get continue to get better but in the meantime it helps a lot just to talk about.

Some of the similarities I have with people with the same condition truly amazes me. Thanks for sharing your stories.

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And it might sound stupid but not having that physical aspect and physical connection, I am feeling left with a void. Unfortunately I live in a small town and am close with a lot of girls I would like move on but of course they all have boyfriends. So I feel like I missed my chance.

It is probably better not to think about it, but it is really hard sometimes.

I felt like you do at your age and also being in a small town made me feel like there just weren't any choices. I took the oppurtunity to be an exchange student at that point. It changed my life and really opened my horizons. Just learning another language was life changing. I'm not saying you should do the same but maybe along with your diagnosis, another change is in order. If there is a place where you want to vacation or live or maybe go to college, just go for it. The big change might fit the emotional changes you're going through with celiac disease. Granted it is scary but so worth it.

I am also the exact same with the age thing. Maybe this is just the way I am but I also feel a lot older than I really am (19). It's almost as if living with gluten sensitivity has made stronger. The only thing I fear now is dying alone. Death in of itself does not frighten me. Maybe I just don't have enough to lose at this point to care. I know things will get continue to get better but in the meantime it helps a lot just to talk about.

Sure you feel older. Your life experiences put you ahead of your peers. That's why another change like a move or starting a new career or school can disrtact you from that. You'll be working hard to adjust and learn all you can and before you know it, you'll meet others you can relate to.

You have a long while to worry about dying alone. You're 19, only 1/5th of your life is past. You have 4 times more than you already have lived to go! So many good things are going to start happening to you! And that thing about dating, my daughter says when you're looking too hard it will never happen. If you just have fun with your friends and family, love will come along by itself, in it's own time. It certainly happened to me that way. This week we're celebrating our 32nd anniversery. So hang in there, reach out for the new experiences life is going to show you and happiness will come.

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And it might sound stupid but not having that physical aspect and physical connection, I am feeling left with a void. Unfortunately I live in a small town and am close with a lot of girls I would like move on but of course they all have boyfriends. So I feel like I missed my chance.

It is probably better not to think about it, but it is really hard sometimes.

I felt like you do at your age and also being in a small town made me feel like there just weren't any choices. I took the oppurtunity to be an exchange student at that point. It changed my life and really opened my horizons. Just learning another language was life changing. I'm not saying you should do the same but maybe along with your diagnosis, another change is in order. If there is a place where you want to vacation or live or maybe go to college, just go for it. The big change might fit the emotional changes you're going through with celiac disease. Granted it is scary but so worth it.

I am also the exact same with the age thing. Maybe this is just the way I am but I also feel a lot older than I really am (19). It's almost as if living with gluten sensitivity has made stronger. The only thing I fear now is dying alone. Death in of itself does not frighten me. Maybe I just don't have enough to lose at this point to care. I know things will get continue to get better but in the meantime it helps a lot just to talk about.

Sure you feel older. Your life experiences put you ahead of your peers. That's why another change like a move or starting a new career or school can disrtact you from that. You'll be working hard to adjust and learn all you can and before you know it, you'll meet others you can relate to.

You have a long while to worry about dying alone. You're 19, only 1/5th of your life is past. You have 4 times more than you already have lived to go! So many good things are going to start happening to you! And that thing about dating, my daughter says when you're looking too hard it will never happen. If you just have fun with your friends and family, love will come along by itself, in it's own time. It certainly happened to me that way. This week we're celebrating our 32nd anniversery. So hang in there, reach out for the new experiences life is going to show you and happiness will come.

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I felt the same way as you about relationships. Only had one boyfriend my whole life, and it was a silly high school thing that lasted for a month and a half.

I have just been best friends with boys my whole life.

Then I tore my ACL and had to have knee surgery. downward spiral, see my signature.

I went Gluten-Free. A year later I feel like normal human being now that I am super strict.

Now for the coincidences: After going Gluten-Free and "finding myself" as many of us on here have said happened only once we went Gluten-Free, I started dating one of my guy best friends who I had a crush on for three years! Plus all these wonderful professional oppurtunities have sprung up now that I am Gluten-Free. I feel like its because I have a clear head and I know what I want to do now.

Also, I don't know if it's practice from being gluten paranoid but I feel like my judgment is so much better after being Gluten-Free.

When I went to the emergency room in my college town because I thought I was going to die with all my "downward spiral" symptoms (see below) they gave me steroids and recommended I seek counseling. Luckily, my mom rushed up to school to visit and scheduled an appointment with a holistic doctor. I started to feel better so there was no need for steroids and counseling, especially because my mom and doctor were so supportive and I got my closest loved ones on board with me too.

IF YOU GET ANYTHING OUT OF MY RAMBLING POST IT IS THIS: if you go see a counselor make sure they are supportive and educated about celiac and gluten and each and every side effect. otherwise, they are going to make you feel worse! my one roomate was a nutty skeptical (go figure his mom was doctor that would rather hand out a pill than listen to you) and when i tried talking to him he made me feel like a whack job! he said being a celiac was all in my head!?!?!?!? grrrr i have found that it is better to talk to supportive people. you may be able to find that on these boards.

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@Alaskaguy With regard to the timing, I think that everyone is a bit different! I used to have a shorter time to onset when I was first diagnosed (within 24h). As time has gone on, and I've glutened myself less and less, I have noticed that the time gets a bit longer.  Recent history seems to matter a bit too - if I've been glutened recently and then get glutened again, the rash will show up faster on the second round. For example, in the last 3 weeks I got slightly glutened by inadvertent
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