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Emmysweet

Symptoms Occur After Overeating? But With gluten-free Foods.

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Hi :

I am relatively new here. Its a wonderful sight.

I am having recurring neuro symptoms after eating. ANd I think I am eating 100% gluten-free foods. My neuro symptoms are the tingling on my hands and arms.

Since I am almost positive its not from CC---does anyone know if the gut is oversensitive to overeating. I just had too much salad and my symptoms came on. Very strange. I would love some input/advice if anyone has any.

Thanks, Emily

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Hi :

I am relatively new here. Its a wonderful sight.

I am having recurring neuro symptoms after eating. ANd I think I am eating 100% gluten-free foods. My neuro symptoms are the tingling on my hands and arms.

Since I am almost positive its not from CC---does anyone know if the gut is oversensitive to overeating. I just had too much salad and my symptoms came on. Very strange. I would love some input/advice if anyone has any.

Thanks, Emily

Hi Emily,

I will just tell you from my own personal experience that it could take some time before the tingling goes away. I had the exact same thing as you with many, many other symptoms. Most will tell you that it depends on your age and how long you were possibly undiagnosed. The younger you are and if if was caught early enough you should heal faster than someone who is older and had this going on a long time.

I am still no where near I need to be and that after being diagnosed July 14th of 2008. I have done my best to not eat gluten allthough, I know that I have inadvertently eaten some from time to time and it has set me back.

I wish you the best on your journey to recovery. Ted.

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When I overeat, I get a reaction as well. It does not last as long as a gluten reaction, and is not exactly the same, but still painful. My doctor told me a long time ago that, since there is so much damage done to my stomach, it will take a while before I'm able to eat large amount of food again. He actually advised me to eat several tiny meals a day, as opposed to 3 big ones. It helps me a great deal. :).

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Overeating in general, especially foods that are high on the glycemic index, can trigger a proinflammatory response in the body from the rapid rise in blood sugar. Your body could be reacting to the inflammation in the same way it would react to gluten/wheat or milk/casein. I believe this is what is happening to me currently, so just recently I have cut out all grains and processed foods until I can pinpoint what exactly is causing me pain.

Also, some grains even if labeled gluten free are only tested up to a detectable amount of gluten. This means that processed grains/flours and foods can still contain tiny amounts of gluten and you could be reacting to these tiny amounts. Some people are just more sensitive than others. I learned about this from doing some of my own research and from previous posts on this website. The FDA allows "gluten free" to be labeled on foods that may contain up to "20 parts per million (ppm)" of gluten. So, anything under a 20 PPM reading would be allowed to be labeled gluten free. Read more here:

http://www.fda.gov/Food/LabelingNutrition/...cm111487.htm#q6

There is also the chance that it is due to cross-reactivity response in your body. If you are newly gluten free or recently diagnosed, your body may still respond to certain foods as if they were an invader. Shari Leiberman talks more scientifically about cross reactivity in her book "The Gluten Connection". There are a ton of hidden thickeners, additives and preservatives added to canned, prepackaged and processed foods (even if they are gluten free) that could be causing you discomfort.

Hope this info helps, I have recently cut out dairy and started to feel better and more recently have cut out all processed food and grains for a while. I would suggest trying this for a bit or keeping a food journal that might help you pinpoint your reactions to certain foods.

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I don't know it this will be much help but I know that if I eat a full serving of peanut butter l(2 tbsp) I get a bad headache and stomach ache. If I limit myself to less than 1 tbsp I'm just fine.. Just not as satisfied!

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Also, some grains even if labeled gluten free are only tested up to a detectable amount of gluten. This means that processed grains/flours and foods can still contain tiny amounts of gluten and you could be reacting to these tiny amounts. Some people are just more sensitive than others. I learned about this from doing some of my own research and from previous posts on this website. The FDA allows "gluten free" to be labeled on foods that may contain up to "20 parts per million (ppm)" of gluten. So, anything under a 20 PPM reading would be allowed to be labeled gluten free. Read more here:

A great respnse BeLaugh86. I am one of those super sensitives.

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People who are sensitive to one food are more likely to be sensitive to more.

Sensitivity is worse with undigested proteins (which gluten, casein, etc. are proteins).

Your body is less able to fully digest all the proteins when you overeat. There is simply "too much" for the stomach to handle it all. Hence, undigested proteins make it to your bowel.

The undigested food is probably causing symptoms by entering your bloodstream. Improving your digestion will likely get rid of the problem, so that the proteins that make it to your gut are digested satisfactorily and the bowel is not overstressed.

Your bowel is also probably more sensitive because it was damaged by celiac. Over time, and after eating healthily (and not overeating) you should be fine eating most other foods.

To get a healthy bowel:

  1. Eat lots and lots of fruits and vegetables, preferably raw (but don't overeat!)
  2. Don't overeat, especially cooked meals or processed foods. Balance out each meal with an apple or orange, for example. Eat small meals and wait for the last meal to leave the stomach (but you don't have to wait for it to leave the bowel!) before eating again.
  3. Eat whole foods (high in natural fiber)
  4. Take probiotics. They substantially aid in digestion and are essential.
  5. Drink enough water
  6. Exercise moderately
  7. Love your life (okay, maybe not so scientific but probably helps!)

But that's just my opinion. What do you think?

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Hi Emily

You don't say how old you are or how long you have been sick, but the longer it's been, the more likely it is that you have nutritional deficiencies from malabsorption. Have you had bloodwork done to check vitamin and mineral levels? If you haven't and can't afford it, you might want to consider upping your intake of Vitmins D, B12, folate, zinc, iron and more.

it takes time to heal and good nutrition will help you get there sooner.

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