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Being that companies are not required to report potential cross-contamination on product labels, it is often a possibility that an item tagged as gluten-free could still have small traces of gluten. Items as simple as sugar, butter, or rice can be subject to cross-contamination simply from being processed on the same equipment or inside the same factory as other items that contain gluten.

My question is this:

When in a grocery store, and you see a product labeled gluten-free, do you buy it without more concern, or do you call the company to ask them if there is possibility of cross-contact?

I have only been gluten-free for 16 days, but have seen no results yet. I want to be careful with my consumption habits, but also realistic.

I am interested in any advice that can be provided. It would be most appreciated. Also, if I have missed a related posting that contains pertinent information, please let me know.

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If you are what we call a super sensitive it is a good idea to call the company about cross contamination. I have used gluten free labeled products without any adverse reactions thus far..

you may not see any real improvements for months if you suffer the digestive symptoms. It was a solid three months before i felt okay with eating. six months before i felt BETTER. not good, but better.

for now plain easy to digest foods may be a better idea for you if this is the case and then later you may add packaged foods back in and see what you can and cannot tolerate

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I believe if not produced on dedicated lines that they must say "processed on equipment that also processes wheat (or nuts, or whatever).

Personally, if I see a product that says gluten free and on the back it says it is processed on shared equipment, I pass it by.

Have a lot of healing to do and was over 50 when diagnosed so I'm being careful. I'd say if you're newly diagnosed, the cleaner the diet the better, just to be on the safe side.

I think you'll find that after you've had gluten out of your system for several months you'll be ultra-aware of it when you (accidentally) ingest it. Most of us seem to get quite sensitive to it, once it's been eliminated from our diets.

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hannahp57 and LDJofDenver, thank you very much for your advice. It has been helpful as I have continued on with a gluten free diet.

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I believe if not produced on dedicated lines that they must say "processed on equipment that also processes wheat (or nuts, or whatever).

Nope! Those labels are completely voluntary. Disclosure of shared facilities (buildings) or equipment is not required by law. The labeling laws in Canada and the US only apply to things INTENTIONALLY included in the product.

And, if you ask a company to "guarantee" that a product is gluten-free, expect the answer to be "no." Every time. Every company. The best you can hope for is that they will say that there are no gluten-containing ingredients used in this product, or in the same plant, and that they take every precaution, and blah blah blah. But you won't get a guarantee because that would make them legally liable if one of their suppliers accidentally sent them a contaminated batch of (insert ingredient name).

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No, I trust nothing that says "gluten free" unless it's a known dedicated company, but then, I'm one of those ridiculously super-sensitives. I also don't use many of those "substitute" foods- I cook most everything from whole foods myself. Sticking with whole foods and keeping a detailed food log is very helpful especially for the first year or so. My food log is 4 years old and it has helped me play detective countless times.

I am right now suffering after a heinous night and I believe the culprit is INHALED gluten from my niece and nephew stuffing their cute little faces with wheat chex in the back seat of my car- I'm not kidding- I can think of nothing else. And four years in, I know a gluten reaction and it is NO FUN!

Good luck and good health,

lisa

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