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New And Need Guidance, Please!

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Please help! I am just a couple of weeks into this and have, as much as I've tried not to, made

mistakes and eaten the wrong thing...lastly it was the Lundberg Rice Chips, labeled "gluten-free" which I took to mean "go at it!" My fingers and hand started to burn and swell shortly after...please, I would like to know what you all eat, specific examples of what you have for breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks....I've read a few books, bought a cookbook, etc., but mostly there are full-on recipes that take a good bit of time...I need ideas on what to grab in the morning and fix relatively quickly for lunch, etc. Any specific, favorite things you all eat and/or fix would be greatly appreciated....

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This is a great list to get started.

Disclaimer: This information, generated by Fox Valley Celiacs (FVC), is intended for the benefit of its members and other interested parties. Some celiacs may have other sensitivities (e.g. corn or soy). The text has not been submitted for approval to the Celiac Sprue Association (CSA). Neither FVC, nor any of its members, assume liability for the use of this information. Reproduction of this material is allowed to facilitate the exchange of celiac information. Food manufacturers' products are subject to formula change at any time. If you cannot confirm, by the label, that a product is gluten free, call the company's toll-free number. Many company websites will list their gluten-free products. A more inclusive list of gluten-free items can be found at www.glutenfreeinsd.com , which is also associated with CSA. ALWAYS read labels.

FOODS

Bacon― Oscar Meyer, Hormel

Baked Beans― B & M, Bush

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Thank you so much for taking the time and going in to such detail. I have so many questions and am feeling overwhelmed. It's been a long road as I'm sure most of you can relate to. Is psyllium husk considered safe as a fiber supplement? I am a mother of 2 w/one husband none of whom have been tested yet but 2 I would suspect...but I am cooking and feeding everyone and wondering to what extent do you all go to as far as having your own cooking utensils, section of the pantry, etc.? Are you just "careful" or should it be like laboratory conditions?? I guess my biggest disillusionment came yesterday with the Lundberg Rice Chips, saying they were gluten-free but had an anti-caking ingredient (tricalcium phosphate, less than 2%) that got me. Then I found out they are not a dedicated facility as far as their rice chips are concerned.

So the realization that you cannot "trust" products that say gluten free as being 100% gluten free is such a let-down. I don't want to munch on carrot sticks or plain rice cakes!! I have discovered Whole Foods Bakehouse items, dedicated and thoroughly CLEAN!...and so good too.

Thank goodness for Whole Foods. How did you all ever learn the ingredients and what is considered safe? What about rice milk? I have been told Rice Dream contains 2% or less gluten....and can say they are gluten free by FDA standards....geez! Are you gluten free or not!?

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Please help! I am just a couple of weeks into this and have, as much as I've tried not to, made

mistakes and eaten the wrong thing...lastly it was the Lundberg Rice Chips, labeled "gluten-free" which I took to mean "go at it!" My fingers and hand started to burn and swell shortly after...please, I would like to know what you all eat, specific examples of what you have for breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks....I've read a few books, bought a cookbook, etc., but mostly there are full-on recipes that take a good bit of time...I need ideas on what to grab in the morning and fix relatively quickly for lunch, etc. Any specific, favorite things you all eat and/or fix would be greatly appreciated....

Hi, I'm new also - about 2 months now. I was really overwhelmed with what to eat and not to eat. I also found the diet to be extremely expensive. i first decided what was most important to have to make meals easy on me and for cooking for my family. Pasta was the first issue. I tasted several different brands until I found one that I enjoyed. ShopRite in my area carries a nice brand, Schar, and whole foods carries several different brands. then I focused on breadcrumbs. I found Aleias to be the best flavored crumbs - extremely close to 4c or Progresso. Then I looked at what I normally use to my day to day cooking and called the companies. I found that most of the products I had on hand were gluten free. Breakfast is tough, trying to get something healthy and quick in the mornings, but I found two cereals at ShopRite, HoneyNut Chex and now they have a Chocolate Chex. Both are very tasty. I added some dried cranberries to the honey nut for a sweeter flavor/

For my breads, I've been going to whole foods. They carry a french baguette in two flavors, always good to have on hand for a quick sandwich. The nature's way or natures best waffles are very tasty very similar to eggo's - Vans were too thick and tasted terrible. They also carry gluten free hot dogs, another quick lunch or dinner and even to bring to a bbq.

Cookies and snacks you can get at the supermarket. Pamela's are good but expensive. Shoprite carries in the sugar free section by their baked goods, Aunt Gussies vanilla and chocolate cookies - they are delicious and sugar free!

One more thing - Axelrod yogurt all flavors are gluten free.

Good luck and start in your own refrigerator - you may be surprised.

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About 1 1/2 yrs in, I no longer eat very many grain based foods. Sounds like the two of you are eating a lot of those products. They are expensive and since I couldn't afford them in the beginning, I just am used to not eating them. I also cut back even more because I just feel better that way. Here's what I'm eating today.

Breakfast: 3 scrambled eggs friend in butter with a little onion and a little tomato, salted and with 2 sliced of Hormel Natural Deli Ham. Constant Comment tea with stevia.

Lunch: leftover spaghetti and meatballs topped with cheese. Water.

Dinner: chicken breast fried in butter and olive oil with seasoned salt, green beans. Koolaid with stevia.

Snacks: Mocha Frappe with stevia using coconut milk and soy milk with a little chocolate syrup. Grapes and cheddar cheese. Banana. Pineapple.

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Thank you all for your input...I've come to the realization that I cannot depend so much on packaged "gluten free" foods and must take charge and learn to prepare my own whole foods....guess I was looking for the easier way out (?!)....thank you all for allowing me to see that. Today I am fixing a pot roast in a slow cooker with potatoes, carrots and onions...not bad, right? Something everyone can eat! As far as snacks, cookies, etc., I will try and limit those and stick to the "dedicated" facilities, like Mary's Gone Crackers products...I am also going to try and make some type of homemade cookie from scratch...this after realizing how much money I have been spending for just 9 cookies in one box!

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Things like this will also simplify your life.

There are grocery shopping guides out there to make your life WAY easier at the store. They list mainstream products (Kraft, Heinz, Kroger, Hormel, etc.) by category (soups, chips, dressings, spaghetti sauce, etc.) There are lots of mainstream groceries that are gluten free, more than you think.

Gluten-Free Grocery Shopping Guides:

http://www.ceceliasmarketplace.com/

http://www.triumphdining.com/?gclid=COPJ4f...CFdVL5QodHR95Bw

There

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Things like this will also simplify your life.

There are grocery shopping guides out there to make your life WAY easier at the store. They list mainstream products (Kraft, Heinz, Kroger, Hormel, etc.) by category (soups, chips, dressings, spaghetti sauce, etc.) There are lots of mainstream groceries that are gluten free, more than you think.

Gluten-Free Grocery Shopping Guides:

http://www.ceceliasmarketplace.com/

http://www.triumphdining.com/?gclid=COPJ4f...CFdVL5QodHR95Bw

There’s another out that can also be downloaded to your PDA device, etc., by Clan Thompson.

I bought the Cecilia’s guide, it was about $25 and worth every dollar. Put an end to standing in the aisle and reading packages for 20 minutes at a time!

It will get easier!

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I apologize for "replying" twice here; I'm still learning how to post correctly, sorry!

Thank you all so much for your help and advice. I am relaxing a bit more, I was extremely uptight when I first posted regarding the "what to eat?!" SOS...I then went through a phase where I would eat things just because they were gluten free and thinking "oh! I can have that, I'm going to eat it, and a lot of it!"....it was as if I thought calories didn't matter anymore...so that is kind of where I am now, back to reality and how I used to eat, keeping tabs on quantity as well as quality (and now quality AND gluten free)....I just read the book "Gluten Girl" and she mentions she went through that period too, lasting about a month before calorie reality set in...I actually made cabbage rolls for last night's dinner with organic ground bison and quinoa! See, I am getting it!

Thank you all.

Ann

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There are two cookbooks that I recommend very highly.

The first is by Carol Fenester and can be found at this link Gluten Free Quick and Easy

The other is a new book that is just incredible. We have tried about 6 entrees and his cookies, and his muffins and lets just say my 16 year old daughter who hates that we are gluten free said "These taste normal" which is the greatest compliment I can give. Robert Landolphi's wife was really sick and I believe in 1999 was diagnose. He is a trained professional chef and he has 100 receipes. Many non-gluten free people are amazed at his receipes. Here is the link Gluten Free Everyday Cookbook. His book alone is worth it for his flour mixes.

One of the things my wife and I dislike is that often gluten free food seems to come across as being what we call "Tree Nut Food." Were from California and sometimes it just reminds of fanatics who are health crazy. We know we can have great tasting gluten free food that is not only healthy but great tasting. One of the benefits for our family is that it use to be before I got diagnosed that we did quick cassroles and had left overs and did not help my wife with the cooking or eat together at the table. We now all pitch in on the cooking and we are sitting down to eat. That has been a huge blessing. Yes, you'll cook more as a celiac but your food should not only be healthier, but you'll be able to have awesome tasting food. Knowing you have to cook more, we just plan that into our day.

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