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Sparkle1988

Biopsy - Got Some Questions

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Hi everyone

I have had an EMA blood test which came back negative. I have now been booked in for a biopsy appointment which is at the end of this month. Could someone please let me know what happens when you go in for a biopsy? Also, would you recommend the throat spray or the sedation. This may sound a bit stupid, but, is the sedation just the gas or is an injection? I am a bit nervous about the biopsy and want the sedation, but I am also scared of needles! lol.

Thanks,

Sparkle1988

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Hi everyone

I have had an EMA blood test which came back negative. I have now been booked in for a biopsy appointment which is at the end of this month. Could someone please let me know what happens when you go in for a biopsy? Also, would you recommend the throat spray or the sedation. This may sound a bit stupid, but, is the sedation just the gas or is an injection? I am a bit nervous about the biopsy and want the sedation, but I am also scared of needles! lol.

Thanks,

Sparkle1988

The biopsy process is an easy one for most of us. If you decide to go with sedation they would generally use IV sedation. If the idea of an IV makes you too stressed out you could go with just the throat spray. Either way what happens is they would put a mouthpiece in your mouth and then you swallow a thin tube, the endoscope, With this tube they can look at the inside of you small intestine and then do a biopsy. There are no nerve endings in there so the biopsy process shouldn't be uncomfortable. I personally would go with the sedation but you should mention your needle fears to your doctor. They might be able to give you an oral sedative to relieve your anxiety that you could take before you go for the procedure.

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I was really nervous about the endoscopy but it really was a piece of cake. I had sedation and it was the easiest I've ever had. It didn't make me sick like most do and didn't leave me all heavy and dopy either. I don't remember a thing. It seems like I blinked and they told me it was all over!

I don't honestly remember if the sedation was a pill or IV but it wasn't a mask which I dislike, would much rather have a shot. I just remember feeling stupid that I'd put it off when it really was so simple.

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Thanks for your replies.

I think I will go to my doctor before my biopsy and ask if they can give me something that would make me more calm about getting the sedation (if it is an injection).

The procedure doesn't last very long anyway does it?

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Thanks for your replies.

I think I will go to my doctor before my biopsy and ask if they can give me something that would make me more calm about getting the sedation (if it is an injection).

The procedure doesn't last very long anyway does it?

I don't know, I think I would feel more comfortable with the throat spray than being injected with a needle to calm. Only the thought of something going wrong with the injection, it will already be in your blood system. As oppose to just throat spray. I think when given the option of not being injected with a needle, most likely a good deal.

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I don't know, I think I would feel more comfortable with the throat spray than being injected with a needle to calm. Only the thought of something going wrong with the injection, it will already be in your blood system. As oppose to just throat spray. I think when given the option of not being injected with a needle, most likely a good deal.

The chance of an adverse reaction to the anesthesia that they would use is not a high one. The procedure is a very quick procedure and the anesthesia is a light anesthesia that would wear off quickly. Also in the rare event of an adverse reaction to the anesthetic the anesthesiologist would be right there to counter any ill effects.

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Hi everyone

I have had an EMA blood test which came back negative. I have now been booked in for a biopsy appointment which is at the end of this month. Could someone please let me know what happens when you go in for a biopsy? Also, would you recommend the throat spray or the sedation. This may sound a bit stupid, but, is the sedation just the gas or is an injection? I am a bit nervous about the biopsy and want the sedation, but I am also scared of needles! lol.

Thanks,

Sparkle1988

I just had the upper endoscopy and a colonoscopy today, and other than the colonoscopy prep the anxiety was the worst part. The staff at the facility where I had my procedure done were wonderful, and it was nowhere near the big deal I thought it would be. In my case, they used an IV for sedation (the IV was just a pinch, not painful at all) and they had me gargle and then swallow some sort of medication to numb my throat. I remember very little of the procedure, I know they put some sort of a plastic guard in my mouth to keep me from biting down on the endoscope, and I do recall some slight discomfort during the colonoscopy. It seemed as though as soon as it started it was over. Now it's just the wait for the results.

Try to relax and not think about it too much. Best of luck to you!

BrianWI

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I also had the biopsy and colonoscopy at the same time with an IV and I would have to say that was the easiest medical test I have ever had. The anesthesia started and after a few seconds I was waking up in another room and I couldn't tell that anything had happened. Walking was a little bit of a challenge for the first half hour as there was some residual dizziness from the anesthesia.

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Hi everyone

I have had an EMA blood test which came back negative. I have now been booked in for a biopsy appointment which is at the end of this month. Could someone please let me know what happens when you go in for a biopsy? Also, would you recommend the throat spray or the sedation. This may sound a bit stupid, but, is the sedation just the gas or is an injection? I am a bit nervous about the biopsy and want the sedation, but I am also scared of needles! lol.

Thanks,

Sparkle1988

I had negative blood work too and I'm having the endoscopy tomorrow! It was helpful to have this info today! I've always tested negative w/blood work and am desperately hoping for a positive biopsy (doesn't it wound weird to hope for a disease!) I went mostly gluten free back in the spring and felt worlds better...until I ate barley. I've been eating gluten again for a couple of months and feel miserable. So..I'm hoping for a positive test result.

One question - how long does is normally take to get results back? Do you get immediate answers from the visual aspect then wait for the biopsy?

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I had negative blood work too and I'm having the endoscopy tomorrow! It was helpful to have this info today! I've always tested negative w/blood work and am desperately hoping for a positive biopsy (doesn't it wound weird to hope for a disease!) I went mostly gluten free back in the spring and felt worlds better...until I ate barley. I've been eating gluten again for a couple of months and feel miserable. So..I'm hoping for a positive test result.

One question - how long does is normally take to get results back? Do you get immediate answers from the visual aspect then wait for the biopsy?

After my endoscopy the doctor came in and told me what he found from the visual inspection. He told me I had distal esophagus inflamation, a normal appearing stomach, mild abnormal looking duodenum, that he took a biopsy from the stomach for h pylori and six samples of tissue for the small bowel biopsy and that he did not really think it was celiac but we will see when the results come back. I got a phone call a week later that the biopsy was positve. So yes it was nice of them to tell you what they saw and how the procedure went, but you'll need to consider the biopsy results. I was pretty lucky to get in for my endoscopy pretty guickly. I had my consult with the gi and the next week was my procedure with the biopsy results a week later. I think as for as scheduling the test so quickly I got in because I work where I had it done and the results because we are not as busy as a lot of big medical centers. Just ask your doctor what is standard protocol but I wouldn't think it should tate a month.

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After my endoscopy the doctor came in and told me what he found from the visual inspection. He told me I had distal esophagus inflamation, a normal appearing stomach, mild abnormal looking duodenum, that he took a biopsy from the stomach for h pylori and six samples of tissue for the small bowel biopsy and that he did not really think it was celiac but we will see when the results come back. I got a phone call a week later that the biopsy was positve. So yes it was nice of them to tell you what they saw and how the procedure went, but you'll need to consider the biopsy results. I was pretty lucky to get in for my endoscopy pretty guickly. I had my consult with the gi and the next week was my procedure with the biopsy results a week later. I think as for as scheduling the test so quickly I got in because I work where I had it done and the results because we are not as busy as a lot of big medical centers. Just ask your doctor what is standard protocol but I wouldn't think it should tate a month.

I had my endoscopy yesterday and it was a piece of cake...although I'm still groggy today - but I'm groggy a lot anyway. He said he thought he saw some damage then he wasn't sure so we'll wait on the biopsy report next week. He also said he'd be interested in doing genetics testing...so now I need to read up on that :) I would be gonig gluten free (again - did the challenge for the testing) starting today but we leave for vacation tomorrow and to start that while on vacation would be too much for my brain....and my family :)

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