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Sunblock For Kids?

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Hi! What gluten-free sunblock do you use for your kids? I have California Baby right now but it's so expensive. $12 for a small thing of it! I'd like a cheaper alternative to keep in my diaper bag!

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We use Neutrogena Ultra Sheer Dry...I love how it is not greasy at all. Last year I called Banana Boat and Coppertone and both companies said all of their sunblocks were gluten free (as of last year). Aveeno has oats, so steer clear of that.

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We use Neutrogena Ultra Sheer Dry...I love how it is not greasy at all. Last year I called Banana Boat and Coppertone and both companies said all of their sunblocks were gluten free (as of last year). Aveeno has oats, so steer clear of that.

Thank you! :) I'll give the neutrogena a shot!

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Hello! I just got off the phone with a rep from Neutrogena and he said that their "Waterguard Kids" and "Age Shield Face" are gluten free.

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Hello! I just got off the phone with a rep from Neutrogena and he said that their "Waterguard Kids" and "Age Shield Face" are gluten free.

Thank you so much for passing this information onto me! :)

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    Jefferson Adams
    The Girl Scouts Adds New Gluten-Free Cookie to Popular Lineup
    Celiac.com 09/19/2018 - Great news for gluten-free cookies lovers!  Girl Scouts has announced the debut of a new gluten-free cookie to its enormously popular cookie brand. 
    The new Caramel Chocolate Chip is a chewy cookie that contains caramel, semi-sweet chocolate chips, and a hint of sea salt. also happens to be gluten-free. The new gluten-free treat will be available in select areas during the 2019 cookie-selling season; which typically runs from February to April each year.
    The gluten-free Caramel Chocolate Chip joins the Girl Scouts’ two other gluten-free offerings: Toffee-tastic, a buttery cookie with sweet and crunchy golden toffee bits, and Trios, a peanut butter oatmeal cookie with chocolate chips. 
    The Girl Scouts of America has been around for over 100 years and now hosts more than 1.8 million girl members. Every year, about 100 million scouts between the ages of five and 18 sell approximately 200 million boxes of cookies nationwide. According to the Girl Scouts website, that money stays local to develop local leadership training activities, summer camps, and more activities.
    According to a 2016 study conducted by the Girl Scout Research Institute, approximately 85% of Girl Scouts surveyed said that Girl Scout Cookie Program helped them learn how to set goals and meet deadlines, while 88% said it helped them become effective decision-makers. Another 88% said they learned how to manage money, while 94% said the program helped them to learn business ethics.
    The Girl Scouts have also added online sales and iOS and Android apps that allow people to find cookies or order from their phones.

    Jefferson Adams
    No Gluten-Free Diet for Tennis Champion Roger Federer
    Celiac.com 09/18/2018 - With a number of major tennis stars singing the praises of a gluten-free diet, including top players like Novak Djokovic, Swiss great Roger Federer weighed in on the topic.
    The 20-time Grand Slam winner says that he’s never tried the gluten-free diet, and that he doesn’t not “even know what that all means…I eat healthy, and I think that's what people should do, too, if they have the options. It's sure important the right diet for an athlete.”
    Djokovic, the 2018 US Open winner has been gluten-free since 2011, and calls the diet his biggest key to his success.
    For Federer, diet is helpful, but not the whole story. “[Diet] can help you, you know. I mean, I think every athlete should be in good shape. I don't think we should have any fat athletes, to be honest. We do too much sports and we should be too professional to let that happen to ourselves.
    If it happens, well, we should wake up. You don't have the right entourage. They're not telling you that you're a bit fat. Players try different things, and whatever works for them. I do my thing. It's been very easy and natural and healthy, and it's worked.”
    So, while Novak Djokovic, and a number of other athletes, have gone gluten-free and continue to tout the benefits, look for Federer to remain faithful to his generally nutritious non-gluten-free diet.
    Read more at: TennisWorldUSA.org

    Connie Sarros
    All About Eggplant
    Celiac.com 09/15/2018 - People have a love/hate relationship with the purple fruit called ‘eggplant’. Eggplants, first cultivated in southern India and Sri Lanka, are also known as aubergine, Guinea squash, melazana, and ‘poor-man’s caviar’. Like potatoes they are members of the nightshade family, and despite the fact that we all consider eggplant to be a vegetable, biologically it is defined as a berry, and therefore it is a fruit.
    When selecting the fruit, select ones that are firm to the touch, have a smooth and shiny skin and are heavy. Avoid those with brown or soft spots and have a dull color. Gently push with your thumb or forefinger. If the flesh gives slightly but then bounces back, it is ripe. If the indentation remains, it is overripe and the insides will be mushy. If there is no give at all, the eggplant was picked too early. Once you bring it home, avoid placing it near tomatoes and apples, as they give off a gas that quickens the ripening process. Try to use the eggplant within two days of purchase.
    There are several cooking hints that will make your ‘eggplant experience’ more tasteful. Do not cook this fruit in an aluminum pan as it may cause discoloration (both of the pan and the fruit!). The skin is edible on small, younger plants, but should be removed on coarser, older ones. Once you cut the eggplant and cook it right away because the flesh will brown (similar to cut bananas). This fruit absorbs oil very easily, so it is recommended that you coat the slices with cornmeal before frying or baking. To help reduce the bitter flavor in older plants, ‘de-gorge’ the eggplant—Slice the eggplant into ½-inch pieces, salt well, then weigh down each slice in a colander to allow the liquid to drain out of the eggplant for 30 minutes—then rinse with cold water and pat dry.
    Equivalents and Nutritional Value—one pound of eggplant equals 3½ cups of diced eggplant and 1¾ cups cooked eggplant. One medium eggplant weights about 1 pound. It contains vitamin C and potassium, has anti-bacterial and diuretic effects, as well as flavanoids (cancer fighting antioxidants). One cup cooked eggplant contains 25 calories.
    The different ways to prepare eggplant are limited only by your imagination. Cut it into matchsticks to add to a stir-fry. Cube it for vegetable stews (Ratatouille). Shred it to make fritters, or puree it for a hummus-style dip. You can also slice it lengthwise and grill it.
    This fruit is probably most famous for the Italian rendition of Eggplant Parmigiana. But the Greeks have taken this dish one step further, ‘Moussaka’. If you have never eaten this, it is a delight to savor. Lean ground beef may be substituted for the ground lamb. Three zucchini may be used in place of the eggplant (if you prefer). Even if you hate eggplant, you will love Moussaka.
    The beauty of Moussaka is that this casserole may be made in advance, then covered and refrigerated overnight, or covered with foil and frozen—before you bake it (thaw in the refrigerator completely before baking). Time is precious for us all, and this concoction does take some time to assemble, but every moment is worth it. This makes an impressive side dish for company, it is perfect for a buffet table, or it can be used as a main dish for a family dinner.
    The following recipe is from my “Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook”. Traditional Moussaka is ‘loaded’ with calories and fat and cholesterol. This version is lower in calories and fat without sacrificing any of the delicious taste.
    Moussaka (Greek Casserole Dinner)
    Ingredients:
    1 large eggplant, peeled 2 teaspoons olive oil 1 large onion, chopped ½ pound lean ground lamb 5 teaspoons tomato paste ¼ cup white wine ¼ cup chopped fresh parsley 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon 18 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon pepper 1 tablespoon margarine 1 ½ tablespoon cornstarch 1 cup scalded 1% milk 1 egg beaten until frothy 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg ½ cup gluten-free lowfat cottage cheese 1/3 cup gluten-free corn muffin crumbs, dried 1/3 cup Parmesan cheese, shredded Directions:
    Preheat broiler. Cut the peeled eggplant lengthwise into ½-inch thick slices. Spray both sides of the slices with gluten-free nonstick spray; set on a broiler pan and broil until browned, turning once. Preheat oven to 350F. Heat olive oil in a skillet; add onion and sauté until lightly browned. Add the lamb and cook, breaking meat up with a fork, for 10 minutes or until the meat is browned. In a small bowl, stir together the tomato paste, wine, parsley, cinnamon, salt and pepper; add to the meat and simmer, stirring frequently, until all liquid has been absorbed. Remove from heat. Melt the margarine in a medium-size saucepan; blend in the cornstarch with a whisk. Slowly stir the hot milk into the cornstarch; cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until thickened. Cool slightly, and then stir in the beaten egg, nutmeg, and cottage cheese. Spray a 9-inch square pan with gluten-free nonstick spray. Sprinkle the bottom lightly with 2 tablespoons of the corn muffin crumbs. Arrange alternate layers of eggplant slices and meat mixture in the pan. Sprinkle each meat layer with the Parmesan cheese and remaining corn muffin crumbs. Pour the cottage cheese mixture over the top. Bake 45 minutes or until the top is golden. Cool slightly before cutting. Makes 6 (4 ½ X3-inch) serving.

    Jefferson Adams
    Nima Labs Claps Back at Gluten Free Watchdog Over Gluten Sensor Data
    Celiac.com 09/14/2018 - Celiac.com was all set to do a story on the latest peer-reviewed data on the Nima gluten testing device, when along comes Gluten-Free Watchdog with another of their famous non-recommendations. Gluten-Free Watchdog says they cannot recommend the Nima gluten test kit because of alleged flaws.
    But what does the science say? The latest Nima article and Gluten-Free Watchdog’s complaint both focus on the science, so let’s start there.
    Nima makes two different food sensors: one detects gluten, the other detects peanuts. Each sensor comprises a small, handheld electronic device and a cartridge. To test food, consumers place a pea sized amount into the cartridge, place the cartridge inside the sensor, and run the device.  They then receive a smiley face or wheat symbol with "gluten found," depending on whether or not the Nima device detected the allergen.
    Nima reported their original data in a peer-reviewed scientific journal. Among the conclusions: “Compared with reference R5, Nima antibodies (13F6 and 14G11) had 35- and 6.6-fold higher gliadin affinities, respectively. Nima demonstrated device performance using a comprehensive list of foods, assessing detection sensitivity, reproducibility, and cross-reactivity. Nima presented a 99.0% true positive rate, with a 95% confidence interval of 97.8%–100%.”
    Gluten Free Watchdog says that:
    “Based on third party testing data, the Nima Sensor fails to detect gluten at the 20 ppm level over 20 percent of the time. It isn’t until a sample contains a level of gluten at the 40 ppm level, that a gluten found result is received close to 100% of the time.” Gluten Free Watchdog suggests that this is a problem, because:
    “At a level of gluten in a sample from less than 2 ppm up to a level of gluten between 30 ppm and 40 ppm, the result displayed on the Nima Sensor may be either smiley face or gluten found. If a sample is tested with a Nima Sensor and the result is a smiley face, there is no practical way for a consumer to know if the level of gluten in the sample is less than or more than 20 ppm. If a sample is tested with a Nima Sensor and the result is gluten found, there is no practical way for a consumer to know if the level of gluten in the sample is less than or more than 20 ppm. As a result, the data point received from the Nima Sensor for gluten presents major interpretation problems.” Gluten Free Watchdog charges that Nima uses “NOT the scientifically validated Ridascreen Gliadin R5 ELISA Mendez Method from R-Biopharm used by Gluten Free Watchdog.” The fact is that R5 Elisa remains the industry standard for most testing applications. 
    Gluten Free Watchdog closes its warning with a word from their independent expert: According to Adrian Rogers, Senior Research Scientist at Romer Labs, “It could be argued that the device is not fit for purpose as the company states that there is a clear differentiation between safe and unsafe products based on a 20 ppm level which the validation data does not corroborate.”
    It’s worth noting that for all his accomplishments, Rogers is neither a doctor, nor a PhD. Rogers' LinkdIn page lists his education as: Bsc (Hons), Microbiology, University of Wales, Aberystwyth. A Bachelor of Science degree may not necessarily make an expert in this subject, yet he is presented as one.
    Rogers also seems to have a potential conflict of interest that was omitted in Thompson’s press release. Directly from Rogers’ LinkdIn site:
    “Romer Labs®, Inc. developed an immunochromatographic lateral flow assay for the qualitative detection of gluten in raw ingredients, processed foods, finished food products, and environmental surfaces, using the G12 antibody developed by Belén Morón. The G12 antibody targets a 33-mer peptide which is resistant to enzymatic digestion and heat denaturation, as well as being the fragment of the gliadin protein to which celiac disease sufferers react, making it a reliable analytical marker.” The company Rogers works for, Romer Labs, makes its own gluten testing kits. It seems a bit disingenuous for Gluten Free Watchdog to use a spokesperson from a potentially competing company to try to counteract a peer-reviewed scientific publication for a device which is made by a potential competitor.
    Nima’s Scientific Advisory Board includes some of the most highly respected celiac disease researchers and scientists in the world. They include: Peter HR Green, MD Phyllis and Ivan Seidenberg Professor of Medicine. Director, Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University; Jody Puglisi, PhD Stanford University Professor of Structural Biology; Lucille Beseler, MS, RDN, LDN, CDE, FAND Family Nutrition Center of South Florida; Benjamin Lebwohl, MD, MS Director of Clinical Research Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University; John Garber, MD Gastroenterology, Mass General; and Thanai Pongdee, MD Consultant, Division of Allergic Diseases, Mayo Clinic.
    Nima says that Gluten Free Watchdog’s view of their recently published validation is incomplete and misleading. Nima wrote:
    “All the studies show Nima is highly sensitive across a range of both low and high levels of gluten." "The Nima third party data accurately reported gluten found at 20 ppm and above between 93.3% for food as prepared (a food item that is spiked with an intended quantity of gluten) and 97.2% for food as quantified by an ELISA lab kit (used to determine the exact ppm of gluten in the food)." "The Nima peer reviewed study published in the Food Chemistry Journal reported gluten found at 20 ppm and above at 96.9% accuracy." The statement that:
    “'Nima will fail to detect gluten at 20 ppm 20% of the time' is almost entirely driven by 1 specific food out of 13 tested. That sample, when quantified, was actually below 20 ppm." "In real life, people get glutened at many different ppm levels, not just 20 ppm. Nima has been shown to detect gluten at levels below, at and above 20 ppm across a variety of foods in a number of studies.” Reading the peer reviewed data provided by Nima, and reading Gluten Free Watchdog’s complaints, it becomes clear that Gluten Free Watchdog’s complaints sound serious and authoritative, but ring a bit hollow. 
    Consider the Following Analogy
    Imagine a gluten-sniffing dog that performed as well as Nima in scientific trials; same performance, same exact data. 
    You can give this dog a sniff, or a small bite of food, and he can signal you if the food’s got gluten in it with 97% accuracy at 20ppm or below. Nearly 100% accuracy at 40ppm or above (as stated by Gluten Free Watchdog).
    People would think that the dog was not only cute and fluffy, but wonderfully helpful and everyone would love it, and everyone with celiac disease would want one. And it would be a great big gushing warm and fuzzy feel-good story. Pretty much no one would be arguing that the dog was potentially dangerous, or somehow unfit for people with celiac disease. Such dogs would also be far more expensive to own and maintain than the Nima device. Apparently such dogs can cost upwards of $16,000, not including the cost of food, vet bills, etc.
    So, what’s the accuracy rate of a gluten-sniffing dog, anyway? From Mercola.com: Willow, a German shorthaired pointer, is another gluten-sniffing dog, in this case living in Michigan. Her owner, Dawn Scheu, says she can detect gluten with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy. She worked with a trainer (the same one who trained Zeus) to teach her own dog to detect gluten, with excellent results.
    Gluten-sniffing dogs may detect gluten in amounts as small as .0025 parts per million with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy. So, will Gluten Free Watchdog be warning against gluten-sniffing dogs anytime soon?
    Somehow, because Nima is a mechanical device made by a company, it's not so warm and fuzzy, not so feel-good. Maybe Nima needs to shape their device like a cute little doggy, or a Pez candy dispenser?
    But the data remains, as does the fact, whatever its drawbacks, anything that detects gluten like Nima does, as well as it does, is potentially very helpful for celiac disease in numerous situations. And it is extremely unlikely to do them any harm.
    Nima seems very much committed to transparency, scientific excellence, and continual product improvement. These are noble goals and generally a win for people with celiac disease. Think of it, just ten years ago, a portable gluten-sensor with the kind of accuracy Nima is reliably achieving would have been the stuff of fantasy. Yet here it is. More accurate than any gluten-sniffing dog, and for a couple hundred bucks. People with celiac disease are living in a very different world than just a few years ago.
    Nima did not have to publish its data, but it chose to do so, and in a reputable, peer-reviewed scientific journal. Nima conducted its research using solid scientific standards, and reported those results publicly. They explained their methodology and results, they acknowledged product limitations and expressed a commitment to improvement. How is this remotely controversial?
    The celiac disease community is fortunate to have companies committed to investing time and money into products and devices that help to improve the lives of people with celiac disease. We feel strongly that the perfect should not be the enemy of the good. Devices like the Nima gluten sensor can be helpful for numerous people with celiac disease.  
    Disclosure: Nima is a paid advertiser on Celiac.com. Celiac.com's advertisers do not influence our editorial content. 
    Read Nima’s full report on test data at: Food Chemistry.com Read Gluten Free Watchdog’s Statement on the Nima device at: Glutenfreewatchdog.org Read Nima’s Reply to Gluten Free Watchdog at: Nimasensor.com

    Edward R. Arnold
    To HAIT and Back: The Musings of a Thyroid Patient on the Vagaries of Medical Diagnosis and Treatment in America
    Celiac.com 09/14/2018 - If it is really true that nobody really wants to see a grown man cry, then certainly nobody would have wanted to hang around me near the onset of a long illness whose mystery would take 14 years to solve.
    It began subtly and mildly in 1989, my 43rd year. I had just finished a long and exhausting malpractice suit on behalf of my daughter, an attractive, genetically-normal child who had contracted quadriplegic cerebral palsy in a completely avoidable incident of post-natal asphyxia which had radically changed the nature of life for my spouse and I. By the time 1989 rolled around, I was thoroughly exhausted and carrying a toxic load of anger directed at an incompetent member of the medical profession who had never learned the importance of state-of-the-art skills in a profession that literally has the power of life, death, and disability.
    From late 1989 on through 1990, I experienced strange episodes of profound sadness, usually of one to two hours duration, that became increasingly disruptive to my ability to handle a job and child-care duties. Initially, these episodes seemed to come from nowhere. Later on, I found that playing certain pieces of music of which I was fond, would send me into such intense sobbing that I would be forced to pull over if this occurred while driving.
    By the time 1991 rolled around, something was to be added to these periodic bouts of intense sadness. Early in that year, my daughter became very ill, keeping both my spouse and I awake at night for weeks on end. By the time the problem was diagnosed to be a dental infection and dental surgery was done, I had begun to have a sensation of “hollowness”, as though I really weren’t part of this world, most of the time. In late summer of that year, a series of events in which my subconscious had informed me that a friend had a serious illness, sent me into a final “dive”: I simply stopped sleeping more than about two hours per night. When I first stopped sleeping, I soon noticed that even low-level use of alcoholic beverages would further interrupt sleep and throw me into a state in which I couldn’t think of anything but how terrible I felt. This state of pronounced alcohol intolerance would continue for 14 years.
    The final blow came in November 1991, when I went into a completely disabling panic/anxiety attack that sent me to bed, cowering. I had no alternative but to seek treatment from the psychiatric profession. Unfortunately, the first two psychiatrists prescribed drugs which either had no effects, or had effects that seemed worse than the problem they were supposed to solve. The third psychiatrist, whom I stuck with for about six months, came up with a treatment plan that was partially effective (but certainly not restorative). I stayed with this psychiatrist until it became clear that his treatment was equivalent to Jefferson Airplane singing “one pill makes you larger, and one pill makes you small”. I was being jacked up every morning by a toxic, activating SSRI anti-depressant so I could semi-function, and then dropped by benzodiazepenes every night into a non-restorative twilight sleep state.
    In retrospect, the most amazing thing about these first three psychiatrists was that not one of them ordered any tests of my endocrine function. Treatment consisted solely of a series of benzodiazepenes, anti-depressants, mood stabilizers, and anti-psychotics, administered in a trial-and-error fashion that yanked my psyche and body chemistry around like a manic pit bull on a two-foot leash.
    Throughout the latter part of 1992, I transitioned to care with my primary-care physician, mostly because I trusted him more than any of the psychiatrists I had seen up to that time. He was able to stabilize me with one of the old tri-cyclic anti-depressants, doxepin, along with low doses of valium. Although doxepin packs a big morning hangover for many who use it, and has very strong anti-cholinergic effects, its ability to put me out at night helped me function satisfactorily for much of the 1990s, even at doses as low as 10mg, once daily in the evening.
    In 1993 I consulted a highly-recommended psychiatrist, who was the first psychiatrist who actually looked at my thyroid function. When my TSH was measured at 3.5, without also checking my FT3 and FT4, that doctor concluded that thyroid was not my problem. Of course, standards of thyroid diagnosis and treatment have changed radically in the 12 years since. Under the new AACE guidelines, a TSH of 3.5 would now be suspect, because studies of patients with TSH over 3.0 have shown that most progress to hypothyroidism (i.e., TSH greater than 5.5). The new AACE guidelines would mean that further testing and evaluation should be done.
    Until the fall of 1997, I continued treatment with doxepin and intermittent valium, adding the practice of meditation to help calm myself. At that time, I came back to my primary-care physician with the symptom of profound exhaustion on top of the symptoms of insomnia, anxiety, and depression I had suffered for years. Fortunately, my GP was suspicious of thyroid function, and found that my TSH was floating above 8. Since this was well above the old/traditional limit of 5.5, he was ready to start treatment, with (as would be expected of most GPs) T4-only replacement.
    I began taking thyroxine (T4) shortly thereafter with high hopes. Initially, the treatment was successful: getting the added thyroxine into my system caused an immediate improvement in quality of sleep.
    However, the use of T4 did not turn out to be an unqualified success. After use of T4 for about a month, it was apparent that use of thyroxine alone did not produce a full recovery—I still suffered from anxiety, which the medication seemed to be increasing.
    In the meantime, hair loss became an issue. Several years earlier, I had noticed that running my fingers through my hair would produce an unpleasant sensation, almost as though the hair roots were tender. By the time of my 50th birthday, in 1996, I had noticed that my pillow was virtually coated with hair by the time I would remove it for washing. Unfortunately, nobody, including my GP, reminded me that hair loss is a prime symptom of hypothyroidism; and, like most males, I was ready to assume it was plain old male pattern baldness. By the time I was treated correctly and the hair loss stopped, I had pronounced thinning on the crown which was too advanced to be reversed in response to the treatment of the thyroid problem.
    In about 1998, I began experimentation with amino acids which was to last for almost seven years. I found that use of tryptopan, 5-HTP, and GABA could reduce (but not correct) the worst of my symptoms. In retrospect, though, use of amino acids is a poor substitute for a well-functioning thyroid, as well as being expensive and inconvenient.
    By the summer of 1999, I had reached a paradoxical situation. Experimentation had shown that my body needed on the order of 100 micrograms of thyroxine (T4) to keep my TSH down to a reasonable level; yet taking that much T4 was causing intense anxiety, requiring me to use strong sleeping medications. By late summer 1999, I had noticed another distressing symptom—my acute sense of hearing was being increasingly impacted by tinnitus. Evidently, the root cause that drove me into hypothyroidism, could also impact hearing.
    It was soon after a household move in the spring of 2000, that I had a partially-disabling attack of severe epicondylitis (more commonly known as tennis elbow). It was obvious that my body was no longer able to handle the short-term stresses of the hard physical work required by a move. This obvious physical symptom, accompanied by increasing periodontal issues and continuing mental issues, prompted me to seek other treatment.
    In September 2000, I began seeing a prominent “metabolic” doctor (M.D.) who is well known for his treatment of the metabolic disorders of diabetics. This doctor has written a number of books related to dietary changes and supplements needed to stave off metabolic degeneration as one ages. I was switched to Armour thyroid, and began treatment with other hormones (primarily hydrocortisone in low doses to supplement adrenal function, and pregnenolone). I took an enormous range of nutritional supplements recommended by this doctor, and also made radical changes in diet, which I maintained for nearly two years. Unfortunately, nothing seemed to really work—I did not obtain substantial relief of my symptoms. A thyroid test in Sep 2001 still showed unsatisfactory results—my TSH was 4.7, and my FT3 was below the bottom of the normal range.
    By the spring of 2002, I had decided I would have to take my care elsewhere if there were to be progress. After doing a brief telephone consult with a naturopath outside my home state, I began seeing a naturopath in my home town for whom I had obtained very positive recommendations via a web search. By March 2002, the naturopath had informed me that testing showed my hypothyroidism was due to anti-thyroid antibodies, i.e., my body was attacking its own thyroid gland. This condition is officially known as Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (HAIT—as I now know, HAIT is the leading cause of hypothyroidism). I found this discovery quite amazing; how come the three endocrinologists I had seen between 1998 and 2002, had not given me this information? I was started on Thyrolar (synthetic combination T3/T4) by the naturopath, because she said that my body’s ability to make T3 may have been compromised by HAIT.
    Soon after beginning to see the naturopath, I learned that Dr. Stephen Langer of Berkeley, CA might have additional information on the problem I had been having with thyroid hormone causing anxiety in a hypothyroid patient. I had searched for information about this syndrome in a number of places but found nothing; for instance, the well-known book “Thyroid Solution”, by Ridha Arem M.D., contains no information on the condition. So, I consulted with Dr. Langer and learned that a small percentage of people with Hashimoto’s are exquisitely sensitive to even low doses of Thyrolar. In fact, the condition is rare enough that virtually no GPs, and only a few endocrinologists, know of its existence. Apparently, it does not have an official name attached to it. I decided to refer to it as “HAIT anxiety syndrome”, although there are a few doctors who prefer to refer to any neurological symptoms accompanying HAIT as “Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy”.
    I began to feel a little better between March 2002 and June 2003. I’m not sure why the message about gluten grains had not penetrated before, but by June 2003, the naturopath reminded me again that she had seen a positive result to a test for antibodies to gliadin (one of the two major proteins in gluten grains) in 2002, and that I really should consider removing gluten grains from my diet. This recommendation was based on three factors:
    I had antibodies to the protein gliadin found in wheat and other gluten grains such as rye and barley; I had anti-thyroid antibodies which were over the threshold that defines HAIT; Medicine really is an experimental science, and this experiment, in spite of its inconvenience, appeared to be worth a try. In a numbers sense, the response of my anti-thyroid antibodies to the removal of gluten grains from my diet was slow, but gratifying. My thyroperox test started off at 25, dropped to 19 within 6 months, 7 within 10 months, and became zero in less than 2 years. I eventually concluded that the removal of gluten grains from my diet was not all that difficult, partly because I wasn’t a celiac who had to worry about that last 1%. I also concluded that removal of gluten would have a positive health effect in terms of the reduced glycemic index of the foods I consumed.
    My symptomatic improvement thereafter was not immediate. It soon became obvious that T3/T4 treatment is not an exact science, and the proportion of T3 to T4 needs to be closer to the human body’s need, not the pig’s need (Both Armour and Thyrolar have the T3/T4 ratio of one part T3 for every four parts T4, typical of the pig’s biochemistry). For instance, in late 2003, my TSH had dropped very low, i.e. I had become clinically hyperthyroid due to excess T3 as revealed by a free T3 test. I have since gone through a couple more of these “yo-yo” episodes while being treated, which is a not uncommon event—thyroid treatment is as much art as science.
    Cost of treatment also became a problem. By June 2004, I began seeing a highly-recommended Physician’s Assistant (P.A.), who was known locally to be very good at thyroid treatment, and whose clinic would accept my health insurance. I continued to see the naturopath, although at less frequent intervals, since my insurance (like most) would pay nothing for naturopathy. The P.A. and the naturopath did not completely agree on treatment methods, particularly the use of adrenal supplements (hydrocortisone and DHEA in low/biologic doses) along with thyroid supplements; but they were both in agreement that I should continue to pursue combination T3/T4 therapy. So, I blended recommendations from the two for awhile, transitioning to T3 and T4 in separate tablets of Cytomel and Synthroid, so the percentage of T3 could be altered.
    I gradually transitioned off adrenal supplements during 2005, and very gradually increased my T3/T4 supplementation over the course of the year. Finally, by September 2005, I began to realize that I truly had recovered my health—I had episodes of feeling really good again! Still, my sleep was not perfect—I had discovered what Ridha Arem M.D. has documented in the book Thyroid Solution: a return to the euthyroid state may not immediately eliminate all symptoms. After going to a small dose of the atypical anti-depressant mirtazapine, I finally could feel, every day, like I had in my 30s. Unfortunately, it had taken an agonizing 14 years to get there.
    Today, I religiously take my 10 micrograms T3, and 75 micrograms T4, split into two doses each day. I also religiously avoid all traces of gluten grains in my diet because I now understand that the gluey, hard-to-digest proteins in them are a substance which can cause major metabolic disruption. Like the co-author of the book “Dangerous Grains”, Ron Hoggan, with whom I have corresponded, I have come to realize that our society’s over-use of a potentially toxic substance isn’t just dangerous to the 1 in 133 people who have full-blown celiac disease—it can cause a very poor quality of life for the approximately 1 in 5 who have gluten intolerance. I have also come to the realization that, to those few who are unlucky enough to encounter the HAIT Anxiety Syndrome, you may require combination T3/T4 therapy to feel better; and, you may never feel as well as you did when you were young, unless you find a way to stop your immune system from waging war on your thyroid.
    Most of all, 14 years after it started, I feel as though a significant part of my life has been taken from me. I was unable get joy or pleasure from life, I was unable to work effectively, and I was unable to be the kind of parent I could have been between my 45th and 59th years of life.
    I never imagine that I would be looking forward to the relatively advanced age of 60. However, given that I now feel better than I did at anytime between the ages of 43 and 59, 60 looks like a good place to be.
    Summary:
    In retrospect, the most important things I ended up learning from 14 years of very unpleasant experience are:
    If you have psychiatric symptoms, e.g., depression, anxiety, panic disorder, etc., make sure your endocrine system is evaluated, with thyroid testing as the cornerstone. Beware of doctors who offer an antidepressant first thing, without endocrine evaluation. The emotional/psychiatric effects of hypothyroidism are just as important, and just as damaging, as the physical ones. Unfortunately, many MD’s focus on the physical. If you want to get well, you have to apply all your skills and intelligence to investigating your problem, which most MD’s may not understand. You may also have to turn to “alternative” practitioners. If your TSH is above 3.0, or maybe even 2.5, and your doctor will not do more comprehensive testing (e.g. FT3/FT4), and/or try a test run of thyroid supplementation, find another doctor. If your doctor diagnoses you as hypothyroid, demand that a test for anti-thyroid antibodies be done. If you have any antibodies, even if they are under the threshold where HAIT is considered to start, get testing for allergy to foods, and testing for allergy to common environmental toxins if food testing reveals nothing. You may find, as did I, that you won’t feel as well as possible until you free your body from antibodies.

  • Posts

    • Could it be vitamin B12 deficiency?  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8600284 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30122939  
    • Yes! I've noticed their eyes, too! When I get glutened badly, my herpes simplex one (cold sore) virus acts up.  The virus is in the nerves on one side of my face where I originally got the cold sore.  The reactivation of the virus causes Bell's palsy.  The Bell's palsy causes my eye lid and mouth to droop (I have a crooked, one-sided smile) and I have hearing problems (some degree of deafness) on that side, too.  The virus is also in my eye on that side and has damaged my pupil. It looks permanently dilated.  Unequal pupil dilation is a sign of drug abuse, so my doctors thought I was abusing my psychiatric medications.  I wasn't.  I was suffering from anticholinergic toxicity syndrome because, like you, they were trying to medicate something I didn't have.  (And I do wonder if the virus reactivation also effects nerves inside my head.) There are several viruses that can cause Bell's palsy, including chicken pox. (Who hasn't had chicken pox?) Here's some reading material.... https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11459884 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15702035 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12237590 Unfortunately I have severe gastrointestinal reactions to acyclovir and similar drugs used to treat viral outbreaks, but I've found mass doses of the amino acid lysine helps tremendously.   Poor TinaE, we've hijacked your post.  So sorry.   Ravenwoodglass, it's been such a relief hearing that I'm not alone in these strange chain reactions of gluten.  Bless you for sharing with me.  
    • I have wondered the same thing. Something I have noticed with myself and one of my children is that when badly glutened and reacting neurologically is that one eye will appear much smaller because the lid will droop. In my case it is the eye on the opposite side from the brain lesions. I find myself looking at pictures of the perpetrators and see many with this difference in eye size. Wondering if it may be a neuro impact in them. I see it often especially in young folks and then will read that they have psychiatric issues and are on meds. Those meds always made me worse because they were medicating something I didn't have. I do so wish they would screen routinely for celiac like they do in some other countries. Maybe we wouldn't have as unhealthy of a population, both physically and mentally, if they would test everyone but it is hard enough to get them to test even those of us with symptoms. I will be looking over your links later. Got called in to work today so not much time this morning. Thanks for the info.
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