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I want to learn how to can.

What is your favorite canner?

And what are some "dos and don'ts" ?

I read pressure canning is better.

I have 2 ladies wanting to help get me started. Next year I will be ready...YES!!!

I hope to collect some jars this year and a canner...

Thanks for all your tips!! :D

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I want to learn how to can.

What is your favorite canner?

And what are some "dos and don'ts" ?

I read pressure canning is better.

I have 2 ladies wanting to help get me started. Next year I will be ready...YES!!!

I hope to collect some jars this year and a canner...

Thanks for all your tips!! :D

It really depends on what you are planning to can. Anything considered high acid foods can be done in a boiling water bath canner (enamal coted aluminum). For example, tomatoes, pickles, relishes, canned fruit(peaches, pears, applesauce). If you are going to can low acid foods like corn, carrots, green beans, meat items, soups etc. then you need to use a pressure canner. You can do the high acid foods in a pressure canner also. I have a water bath canner and have only canned stuff recommended for that method. I have helped my mother can other stuff in the pressure canner. (I have not braved it yet myself). A water bath canner is less expensive than a pressure canner, but the advantage to a pressure canner is that you can do everything in it.

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Oh. I forgot to mention that the Ball Blue Book of Preserving is a great addition to have. I have used it often. Another thing to remember is that when you use a pressure canner you really do not want to have any distractions. You really need to watch the pressure guage and maintain it at the proper pounds pressure (by regulating the flame or electric burner). It does have a saftey valve that will pop open if the pressure gets to high, but properly watched this should not happen unless it just malfunctions. The nice thing about it is that processing times are less than with water bath canning. Someday I will get one myself. :P

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Oh. I forgot to mention that the Ball Blue Book of Preserving is a great addition to have. I have used it often. Another thing to remember is that when you use a pressure canner you really do not want to have any distractions. You really need to watch the pressure guage and maintain it at the proper pounds pressure (by regulating the flame or electric burner). It does have a saftey valve that will pop open if the pressure gets to high, but properly watched this should not happen unless it just malfunctions. The nice thing about it is that processing times are less than with water bath canning. Someday I will get one myself. :P

Really good advice. The newer pressure cookers are better than the ones we had many years ago so do get a new one rather than a 'hand-me-down. When I was a chef we did everything from scratch and I used a pressure cooker for the beans for my refried beans. I got busy with something else in the kitchen and all of a sudden there was a big BOOM and cooked beans and the lid flew. The other employees got a big laugh out of my diving under the prep table and crawling shaking and quivering out of the kitchen covered in beans. I of course found it not a bit funny. Quite a mess to clean up and I refused to use that cooker ever again.

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Gosh, today must be your lucky day to ask the question because the Gluten Free Girl website just did a whole post on canning, complete with instructional videos.

http://glutenfreegirl.blogspot.com/

Good luck!

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I have both types of canners and each has its place. I use the water-bath canner for tomatoes and fruits. I think it gives a fresher product, but it is kind of cumbersome because of the large amount of water used. It can get quite heavy. I use the pressure canner for low acid foods such as green beans or meat. Its easier to use as it doesn't require that much water but you do have to keep your eye on it. I used to freeze more but I've got an eye on my energy consuption and am no longer using the huge electic hog in the basement. Last year, with my preesure canner, I canned turkey breast meat and broth. What a treat that was on a cold winter night to just heat it up and throw in some noodles. As close as I get to proccessed food! I also canned vege soup, pot roast in broth, and chili. This fall I will can more of these items as they go on sale. Another plus over freezing - you don't have to worry if the electricty goes out, which happens often in my area. The ball blue book is an excellent place to start. Good luck, nothing more satifying than seeing shelves of preserved food in the basement.

ps jelly and pie filling in the waterbath

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Really good advice. The newer pressure cookers are better than the ones we had many years ago so do get a new one rather than a 'hand-me-down. When I was a chef we did everything from scratch and I used a pressure cooker for the beans for my refried beans. I got busy with something else in the kitchen and all of a sudden there was a big BOOM and cooked beans and the lid flew. The other employees got a big laugh out of my diving under the prep table and crawling shaking and quivering out of the kitchen covered in beans. I of course found it not a bit funny. Quite a mess to clean up and I refused to use that cooker ever again.

:lol::blink: Sorry! And I thought exploding beans in the microwave was messy.

Thanks for the not getting a used one tip ;)

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You guys are great! Thanks for all the info...it's most helpful!!!!!

Can a pressure canner be used w/o the lid as a water bath canner?

Has anyone gotten sick from canning? My mom is worried about me canning...not me!

Thanks for the links too ;)

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You guys are great! Thanks for all the info...it's most helpful!!!!!

Can a pressure canner be used w/o the lid as a water bath canner?

Has anyone gotten sick from canning? My mom is worried about me canning...not me!

Thanks for the links too ;)

I have not got sick yet. If something smells funny, is cloudy, looks funny, or you are just in doubt dont eat it! When processing it can be normal for things to discolor some and if the liquid does not cover everything sometimes even be mushy. Processing to long can make a mushy product too. The book I mentioned before has information about this too. I canned peaches, pears, and applesauce last year. Man did we enjoy them. It is a taste and freshness you can't get with store bought canned goods.(no can taste). This year I have canned kosher dill pickles and will be doing more of the other stuff too. I was hoping to can some tomatoes this year. I planted 18 plants in my flower gardens and not a ripe tomato yet! :angry: Last year I only had 4 plants and had tomatoes coming out of my ears. Everyone around here is complaining of similuar proplems with the tomatoes.

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So much to say, so I forget things. This sorta has something to do with canning, but you don't use a canner and it is really fun. Take widemouth pint jars and place on heavy baking tray. Spray the inside with non stick cooking spray. Fill about 1/2-2/3 full with your favorite pound cake recipe batter. (I have not tried this gluten free yet, but I don't see any reason why it would not work) Bake in oven until a toothpick inserted in middle indicates it is done. Pull out of oven, wipe off the rims of the jar and place on canning lid and ring to seal. Let cool. When the cake cools it will create a vacuum just like when you can and they will seal (you will probably hear the lids make a popping noise). They will last quite awhile. I used to make cloth covers for the tops and tags and give them away as gifts in baskets. Plus people are amazed you can have "cake in a jar"

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I have not got sick yet. If something smells funny, is cloudy, looks funny, or you are just in doubt dont eat it! When processing it can be normal for things to discolor some and if the liquid does not cover everything sometimes even be mushy. Processing to long can make a mushy product too. The book I mentioned before has information about this too. I canned peaches, pears, and applesauce last year. Man did we enjoy them. It is a taste and freshness you can't get with store bought canned goods.(no can taste). This year I have canned kosher dill pickles and will be doing more of the other stuff too. I was hoping to can some tomatoes this year. I planted 18 plants in my flower gardens and not a ripe tomato yet! :angry: Last year I only had 4 plants and had tomatoes coming out of my ears. Everyone around here is complaining of similuar proplems with the tomatoes.

I planted 13 tomato plants and we have had 2 deformed red ones, 1 baby roma and 2 cherries...most of my plants are heirloom. Others nearby don't have toms yet either. Next year I plan to plant some container toms to put on the porch. We had a cold and wet June this year, could have slowed them down. I never thought about canning applesauce before. I went for a walk this morning and picked a handful of wild green apples. Very tart but I thought they would make good pies...taste like tart grannies. I will let them grow some more. Thanks for all of your help :)

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So much to say, so I forget things. This sorta has something to do with canning, but you don't use a canner and it is really fun. Take widemouth pint jars and place on heavy baking tray. Spray the inside with non stick cooking spray. Fill about 1/2-2/3 full with your favorite pound cake recipe batter. (I have not tried this gluten free yet, but I don't see any reason why it would not work) Bake in oven until a toothpick inserted in middle indicates it is done. Pull out of oven, wipe off the rims of the jar and place on canning lid and ring to seal. Let cool. When the cake cools it will create a vacuum just like when you can and they will seal (you will probably hear the lids make a popping noise). They will last quite awhile. I used to make cloth covers for the tops and tags and give them away as gifts in baskets. Plus people are amazed you can have "cake in a jar"

Ya know, I read something about that once last year. They were sending them to our service peeps but I thought how are they sending glass jars, then I forgot all about it. I am not gluten-free so that sounds like a fun thing to try. My gluten-free dd LOVES angel food cake. So pound cake she doesn't have to make would be a great gift, esp. during strawberry season. Sounds like a good winter project to play with. I will need to find a gluten-free recipe for it. Thanks again and again!! ;)

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Hi Purple--I dug this old thread up and thought it might be interesting for you to read.

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/index.ph...&hl=canning

You may have already seen it, but in case you didn't....... :D

Oh my gosh...thanks! It's as long as the Lorkas bread thread...whew. Before I start reading it I will get me out a notebook to take notes. Thanks jerseyangel!

There are gardening tips too!

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Hi. I was just curious if you have canned anything yet? I went out and bought a 16 qt. pressure canner/cooker. I have used it twice now. I made chicken stock in it the first time. Oh my gosh. I will never make stock any other way again! It was soooo easy and tasted great. I made chicken/vegetable/rice soup out of it. Sunday I had some tomatoes that needed canned so I decided to do them in the pressure canner so I could see how it worked. It was pretty easy also. I followed all the directions and I managed to put up 6 qts. I already have plans on making beef and chicken stock and canning it up with the meat in it and I want to can some stew meat too.

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Hi. I was just curious if you have canned anything yet? I went out and bought a 16 qt. pressure canner/cooker. I have used it twice now. I made chicken stock in it the first time. Oh my gosh. I will never make stock any other way again! It was soooo easy and tasted great. I made chicken/vegetable/rice soup out of it. Sunday I had some tomatoes that needed canned so I decided to do them in the pressure canner so I could see how it worked. It was pretty easy also. I followed all the directions and I managed to put up 6 qts. I already have plans on making beef and chicken stock and canning it up with the meat in it and I want to can some stew meat too.

I haven't yet b/c I still need a canner. I bought some jars though. A lady showed me how to can green beans. I am thinking about getting the 16 qt also. Glad to hear you made some good broth, etc!

I am planning next years garden so I will be able to can lots of goodies. I am going to make salsa and roasted tomato soup this week and then freeze some since I don't have a canner yet. Lots of ideas swimming in my head.... :blink:

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I want to learn how to can.

What is your favorite canner?

And what are some "dos and don'ts" ?

I read pressure canning is better.

I have 2 ladies wanting to help get me started. Next year I will be ready...YES!!!

I hope to collect some jars this year and a canner...

Thanks for all your tips!! :D

I started canning for the first time this year did the boiling jar thing don't know what it is called. Since have beed dignosed with celiac and was wondering if canning spices are gluten free what are you doing about that?

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I started canning for the first time this year did the boiling jar thing don't know what it is called. Since have beed dignosed with celiac and was wondering if canning spices are gluten free what are you doing about that?

You canned using the water bath method. What sort of things did you can? Some things should only be done in a pressure canner. Last year, before I was diagnosed I put up, applesauce, peaches and pears. I have eaten them since being diagnosed and have not noticed any problems. I always make sure my working area is extremely clean before canning anything. My only ingredients were water, sugar, honey or cinnamon though. I was always pretty careful even before my diagnosis not to double dip measuring spoons/cups between flour and spices/sugar containers etc. I did not replace all of my herbs and spices like most people recommend and I have been fine. Your single ingredient spices are gluten free (unless contaminated). Pickling spices are gluten free. It is a mix of cloves alspice, cinnamon, bay and maybe a few others. If you used any kind of premade mix (like Mrs. Wages etc.) I would check with the company to verify gluten status. I don't know about those since I have never used them. You will have to be your own judge and determine if you want to eat them or not. Alot depends on how clean (of flour dust ) your kitchen/counters were and if you think your spices and herbs were cross contaminated. I know some would not chance it. I probably would (and have) depending on your habits prior. Also white vinegar and cider vinegar are fine also which is what is recommended for canning anyways.

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I made strawberry jam tonight for the first time. I had several bags of frozen strawberries in the freezer so I thought I would give it a try. It tastes so good. I have 8 half pint jars sitting on my counter cooling. So far 7 of them have sealed. If the last one doesn't I'll just put it in the fridge. This kind of stuff does not last long around here. This was the first time using my water bath canner on my new stove. Everyone noticed a bad smell and my husband and I figured some grease splattered on the grate and was burning off. Well, after the canner came to a boil I got to looking at the counter beside the stove more carefully. Guess what the bad smell was? YEP, I burned a spot on the countertop. :o I'm lucky it didn't catch fire, just blackened and smoldered. Oops! :( This new stove really rocks compared to the old one. I have used my pressure canner/cooker on it but it is much smaller. I guess I'll be replacing countertop a little sooner than planned. <_<

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You guys are great! Thanks for all the info...it's most helpful!!!!!

Can a pressure canner be used w/o the lid as a water bath canner?

Has anyone gotten sick from canning? My mom is worried about me canning...not me!

Thanks for the links too ;)

Purple, the answer is yes you can use your pressure canner for steaming fruits and tomatoes!! :P Add water to 3 inch level around qt jars in canner, put on lid but leave petcock open. Allow strong steam to come from petcock for 20 minutes, do not let it come full steam or juice will be pulled out of jars. Everything has such agood shape when finished. I have used this method in my basement canning kitchen for many years. Works best with tomatoes, peaches and pears, have done some pickles and jellies too. Is neccesary to pressure veggies and meats.

A question...how does wheat allergy comapare to being Celiac or gluten intolerant?? Did not know where to put this question. Good luck with your canning. EvieLS (formerly evie)

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Yay! I finally got to can something. Yesterday 7 pints of pickled beets and today 6 pints of plain beets!

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I also canned vege soup, pot roast in broth, and chili.

Did you do these in the pressure canner? I have canned tomatoe in the water bath, and I have done tomate sauces and jellies by just filling the jar with hot liquid and turning the jar for a while. (When you turn it back over, it seals itself). But, I have kids in colleged wanting mom's homemade soup and chili. Do I need a pressure canner for these?

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Did you do these in the pressure canner? I have canned tomatoe in the water bath, and I have done tomate sauces and jellies by just filling the jar with hot liquid and turning the jar for a while. (When you turn it back over, it seals itself). But, I have kids in colleged wanting mom's homemade soup and chili. Do I need a pressure canner for these?

The method you describe with the jelly is not recommended anymore. You should use a water bath canner or freeze it for saftey. For low acid foods (except tomatoes and anything pickled) you need a pressure canner to heat it up to adequate temperature to kill bacteria. Inside the box with the pressure canner is an instruction book and how to can just about anything. I recommend a pressure canner that does not have the guage but the regulator that rocks. The guages can be very innacurate.

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The method you describe with the jelly is not recommended anymore. You should use a water bath canner or freeze it for saftey. For low acid foods (except tomatoes and anything pickled) you need a pressure canner to heat it up to adequate temperature to kill bacteria. Inside the box with the pressure canner is an instruction book and how to can just about anything. I recommend a pressure canner that does not have the guage but the regulator that rocks. The guages can be very innacurate.

According to the experts on garden web forums, the booklet that comes with the canner is not updated. And yes the gauges can be off by 4lbs and needs to be tested every canning season.

Here is canning link:

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/harvest

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