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So Canola Oil?? Okay or not? Supposedly it's supposed to be okay, but I felt glutened after I had some (with no other possible cause). Has anyone else experienced this?

Thanks for the thoughts and info!!

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how long have you been gluten free? From what I've been told by other users on here, many celiacs have trouble with high fat foods. Canola oil is obiously high in fat, even if it is good fat. When I eat any nut butter I feel awful!! Nut butters are very high fat. Perhaps the fat issue will go away with time, depending on how long you've been gluten free. If your sure it's not cc then that would be my guess. Maybe as you heal it will get better.

Sorry I couldn't be of much help.. I'm sure someone else will help.

Good luck and hope you feel better:)

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I have had almost the same bad gut reaction to canola oil that I have to soy, which is for me a major cause of stomach distress, DH, the usual. I started looking on the labels for it and I was amazed at how many things it's in. It's like soy oil. They use it in so much you almost can't get away from it unless you shop only in health food store and even then you still have to look and be prepared to pay a whole lot more.

I'm not allergic to nuts so I switched to peanut oil for when I occasionally fry home cute french fries and olive oil for when I am only using small amounts to cook or make salad dressings with. (I like the olive oil better, but it doesn't do deep fry very well and FF in peanut oil tastes better to me than fries made in straight corn oil.)

I won't touch canola or anything made with it. Or soy oil, ditto. My body just doesn't like them. There are other oils I've tried, besides olive and peanut, like sesame for stir fry, but those two plus real butter sometimes, they are my staples now. But canola,soy, you need to really check the labels for them. They're in everything from margarine to mayo, and almost always in salad dressings and common "veggie oil" and both of them can really make you sick if you are sensitive to them.

At this point I'm literally making my own mayo and salad dressings because it's cheaper and I can control that. They may not last as long as the commercial kind, but they actually taste better and are definitely better for me.

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Have you tried grape seed oil or coconut oil?

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Have you tried grape seed oil or coconut oil?

Grapeseed oil is okay, but a bit too expensive for regular use and it's hard to get around here. I have had it though. Coconut I can't have. I haven't got a nut allergy that I know of, I eat many nuts, no problems, but for some reason coconut oil isn't something I can tolerate. It can give me hives if I eat something with it.

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I read someplace that about 50% of those with Celiac (or maybe it was gluten intolerance) react to canola. I know I do, so I don't eat anything with it.

For cooking, some decent oils include safflower and sunflower. Macadamia, and coconut are great too, if you can afford them, though they generally don't handle quite as much heat.

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I read someplace that about 50% of those with Celiac (or maybe it was gluten intolerance) react to canola. I know I do, so I don't eat anything with it.

For cooking, some decent oils include safflower and sunflower. Macadamia, and coconut are great too, if you can afford them, though they generally don't handle quite as much heat.

Where did you read that Riceguy? I've never heard any such thing.

richard

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I can't have canola oil either. But I seem to be intolerant of plant oils in general, maybe because of high content of omega-6 fatty acids. I use olive oil and safflower oil, butter and ghee. Would like to try coconut oil, but all of them here have "may contain traces of wheat..." label on them. :(

PS: I did a bit of searching and found an interesting article

http://www.westonaprice.org/The-Great-Con-ola.html

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I can't have canola oil either. But I seem to be intolerant of plant oils in general, maybe because of high content of omega-6 fatty acids. I use olive oil and safflower oil, butter and ghee. Would like to try coconut oil, but all of them here have "may contain traces of wheat..." label on them. :(

PS: I did a bit of searching and found an interesting article

http://www.westonaprice.org/The-Great-Con-ola.html

Excellent article! Thanks!

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:o About 4-5 years ago I started choking on saliva and swallowing food and drink into my lungs. It took a very long time to determine the cause. I really suspected Canola oil so I stopped and started using it. I seemed to be better without it. So I eliminated it, or so I thought. My choking got about 75% better. 7 months ago I tried the gluten-free diet and after a month or so all the choking was gone along with about 30 other problemns. So I sorta forgot about Canola oil.

recently, I have been choking again, maybe 3-4 times a day. I also had a bunch of those 30 symptoms return. So I thought I was getting glutened, I started checking labels every time I ate and I noticed canola oil in the gluten free processed foods. I eliminated the Trader Joe's gluten-free cookies and got a little better. Likewise the gluten-free waffles. Still choking but a little better.

Yesterday I went to Sprouts and read the ingredients in :ph34r::angry: roasted pumpkin seeds--Canola oil. I had noticed last week the roasted cashews could not be found without canola oil, likewise some other nuts.

So if nuts bother you, check to see if roasted in canola oil.

In the very out of date pamphlet Kaiser gave me a couple weeks ago they list Canola oil as a problem.

A friend suggested Grapeseed oil. I miskeyed it into Google and got results for rapeseed oil-which is about the same as canola. Then I noticed I had not entered 'G'rapeseed so I tried that. I could not find anything negative about grapeseed oil, but a lot positive.

gailc :D

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:o About 4-5 years ago I started choking on saliva and swallowing food and drink into my lungs. It took a very long time to determine the cause. I really suspected Canola oil so I stopped and started using it. I seemed to be better without it. So I eliminated it, or so I thought. My choking got about 75% better. 7 months ago I tried the gluten-free diet and after a month or so all the choking was gone along with about 30 other problemns. So I sorta forgot about Canola oil.

recently, I have been choking again, maybe 3-4 times a day. I also had a bunch of those 30 symptoms return. So I thought I was getting glutened, I started checking labels every time I ate and I noticed canola oil in the gluten free processed foods. I eliminated the Trader Joe's gluten-free cookies and got a little better. Likewise the gluten-free waffles. Still choking but a little better.

Yesterday I went to Sprouts and read the ingredients in :ph34r::angry: roasted pumpkin seeds--Canola oil. I had noticed last week the roasted cashews could not be found without canola oil, likewise some other nuts.

So if nuts bother you, check to see if roasted in canola oil.

In the very out of date pamphlet Kaiser gave me a couple weeks ago they list Canola oil as a problem.

A friend suggested Grapeseed oil. I miskeyed it into Google and got results for rapeseed oil-which is about the same as canola. Then I noticed I had not entered 'G'rapeseed so I tried that. I could not find anything negative about grapeseed oil, but a lot positive.

gailc :D

I don't use Canola oil at all for a variety of reasons. I do use grapeseed whenever I don't use olive oil, and I love it. Also use avocado oil when I'm splurging. :D

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Hmmm...I've never had trouble with canola (but I have with safflower) oil. After reading this thread I googled "how is canola harvested" and found this frightening university article: http://www.canola.okstate.edu/commonquestions

It says that interplanting with wheat is good. :angry: Canola and wheat apparently grown in the same areas of US and Canada. And it looks like wheat and could be harvested with the same equipment and stored in the same silos.

I guess that I will be using more olive oil and coconut oil. Maybe walnut oil.

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I found this link with a little further explanation on how canola oil is processed. Granted, it's from 3/2009, but maybe it's still accurate...http://glutenfreeinsd.com/ingredients_%20confusing.html

(Note: I think their statement that it's "not" consisdered gluten free is a typo and should actually say "now")

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Old thread but an interesting topic. Like Mushroom, I avoid canola oil. I don't worry about it in baked goods, but I don't cook with it. I don't care to eat erucic acid and canola can be GMO. I use olive oil for most things and peanut oil for frying.

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Generally vegetable oils are highly processed and go rancid very quickly, even before you buy them. This is because they are low in saturated fat. For example, coconut oil is high in saturated fat, which gives it a long shelf life and makes if good for cooking with. If one gets over the whole "saturated fat is bad for you" nonsense, then there is no problem.

Most people also don't realise that animal fats are not only saturated fat, but often contain large amounts of other fatty acids such as monounsaturated fatty acids, the same as what you find in olive oil. The fats in animal foods also contain the fat soluble vitamins (such as vitamin A, D, E, K), so removing the fat will have a negative impact on vitamin content of the food and so it's health benefits.

Also butter, coconut oil and macadamia oil for example is very low in Linoleic acid (an omega-6 fatty acid), which is very high in most vegetable oils. A high ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids in the diet accentuates omega-3 fatty acid deficiency. This is a common problem in modern western diets that are high in vegetable oils now.

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