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Tim86

Does A Casein-free Diet Need To Be Followed As Strictly As A gluten-free Diet?

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I know that when you are on a gluten-free diet, you need to cut it out 100%. Even the slightest trace of gluten can cause problems. I have some questions about a casein-free diet:

  1. Is that also true with a casein-free diet? I've heard casein doesn't cause damage to the intestines, so I'm theorizing that occasional consumption of casein (whether intentional or accidental) will not cause you to backtrack on any progress you've made. It may cause symptoms, of course, but once you recover from those symptoms, will you be right back where you left off? Am I making sense?
  2. A similar question is...if you are casein intolerant, will you feel at least somewhat better if you just cut out the most obvious sources (milk, cheese, sour cream, butter, etc.)? Or do you have to read labels and try to get rid of it 100% (like you do with a gluten-free diet)?

I don't know if I am casein intolerant. I'm just trying some things to figure it out.

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Well, for me it's all traces. My body does not digest it. The small amounts just hang out in there until there is a bunch of it (lactic acid buildup?) and then I'm really sick (cramps and D) for a day. The lingering effects are swelling in my hands and feet and pain in my lower back. It feels like the hip bone to the left of my spine is "out". I have a long drive to work, then ten hours on my feet running around on a cement floor, then another long ride home. Without traces of dairy, I enjoy the radio and the time away from my kids, pets, customers, co-workers. With dairy the ride is a painful chore.

Also I would question whether repeated irritation and swelling would eventually cause permanent damage like arthiritis in my joints. scarring?

Maybe different for others, hope this helps,

RA

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I think that, whether you completely abstain (no traces) or just cut out the main sources of casein, depends on how you initially decided to abstain from casein. If you had a blood test (like ELISA) show you had high IgG antibodies to casein or a stool test (like Enterolab) show you had high IgA antibodies to casein, I'd say you need to avoid even traces of casein. However, if you self-diagnosed that casein may caused symptoms, I'd suggest you get tested to verify whether you have a casein (milk protein) allergy or lactose (milk sugar) intolerance.

For years I thought I just had lactose intolerance. So I used lactose free products and 'lactaid' supplements. However, I still had more 'symptoms'. Then I ordered the Enterolab test which diagnosed both my gluten and casein intolerances. After I abstained from both gluten and casein, I learned to recognize from accidental ingestion of either gluten or casein which symptoms indicated what I had ingested. For example, my gluten reaction felt like bits of broken glass slowly moving through my intestines, with bloating and localized cramping. However, my casein reaction felt like waves of cramping pain, similar to bad menstrual cramps, plus bloating, and sinus congestion.

SUE

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I think that, whether you completely abstain (no traces) or just cut out the main sources of casein, depends on how you initially decided to abstain from casein. If you had a blood test (like ELISA) show you had high IgG antibodies to casein or a stool test (like Enterolab) show you had high IgA antibodies to casein, I'd say you need to avoid even traces of casein. However, if you self-diagnosed that casein may caused symptoms, I'd suggest you get tested to verify whether you have a casein (milk protein) allergy or lactose (milk sugar) intolerance.

For years I thought I just had lactose intolerance. So I used lactose free products and 'lactaid' supplements. However, I still had more 'symptoms'. Then I ordered the Enterolab test which diagnosed both my gluten and casein intolerances. After I abstained from both gluten and casein, I learned to recognize from accidental ingestion of either gluten or casein which symptoms indicated what I had ingested. For example, my gluten reaction felt like bits of broken glass slowly moving through my intestines, with bloating and localized cramping. However, my casein reaction felt like waves of cramping pain, similar to bad menstrual cramps, plus bloating, and sinus congestion.

SUE

How long do your reactions last? I think I am having one now on the tail end of 2weeks of it. It is better now. I think I had gluten and then ate a bunch of dairy. It started at the top of my stomach with C and now it feels like its down in my intestines and I have D. I think I am gluten and casien intolerant but its hard to tell cause I can eat dairy for like a month before reacting to it. sound familiar?

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How long do your reactions last? I think I am having one now on the tail end of 2weeks of it. It is better now. I think I had gluten and then ate a bunch of dairy. It started at the top of my stomach with C and now it feels like its down in my intestines and I have D. I think I am gluten and casien intolerant but its hard to tell cause I can eat dairy for like a month before reacting to it. sound familiar?

My gluten reactions last almost 2 weeks. My casein reactions can last 10 days to 2 weeks. I've never had accidental contamination from both gluten and casein. However I suspect I'd react for about 2 weeks. I react almost immediately to casein with sinus congestion, but the gut stuff happens about 30-60 minutes later. My gluten reactions are also delayed by maybe 30 minutes. However I haven't accidentally had either for several years. So I really don't know how fast, how intensely or how long I would react now. I did notice that the longer I abstained from any of my allergens (I have 7) the more intensely I reacted to accidental contamination the next time.

If you're uncertain whether you're intolerant of casein, get tested. Both Enterolab (stool test for IgA antibodies) and any docs who use ELISA ( blood tests for IgG antibodies) can diagnose casein intolerance (or allergy).

SUE

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