Jump to content
  • Sign Up
0
AliB

Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD)

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Anyone following this?

I have started it today. I knew gluten and dairy were a problem, but I also knew that my problems went further than just gluten-free/DF.

A lot of this makes sense. I have bought Elaine Gottschall's book and am doing the chicken and carrots stuff. Even within a few hours I am beginning to feel a little better.

I noticed on the other thread that whilst some were having some success, they would talk about problems with corn and eating different makes of tinned veg. Anything that comes out of a tin is going to be suspect! What is wrong with just cooking raw carrots? They were also looking for commercially made products without corn - if you make it yourself, you know what is in it.

So - any SCD success stories out there?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yah i did this and had a major detox. i was eating lean pork and vegetables. all my symptoms went away but they came back because i couldnt stick to it. it can be so hard to get the body to transition eating with little to no carbs. but stick to it..it really does work!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My friend is on this diet for three months for colitis and has noticed measurable improvements. She is following it strictly and is feeling great. She's down to 10 mg of prednisone from 20 mg 3 months ago. She plans to stick it out for two years to help her get healed up and off meds. I am thinking about starting this diet after we go to Disney at the end of the month to try to propel myself into the final stages of healing. I am at 11 months since going gluten-free/cf and seem to still be struggling with some minor issues trying to heal.

Best wishes!

If you want to start a support thread, I'd be into that!

terri

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can this be a support thread, or do you mean on some other forum??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm on it too!

I decided to modify the diet a bit to make it safer in my eyes. instead of starting at the intro diet I started with roughly the full diet taking all the high calorie foods (ie honey) and have had a week of that before toning it into the intro diet which I shall begin tomorrow when my yogurt is ready. I didn't think my body would be happy with too sudden a drop in calorie intake, for one it sets your adrenal glands off a bit.

So after that week how do I feel? well no that much different, however when I initially started a week ago I felt very tired and needed lots of pick me up honey so Its improving. Cutting out foods for me is real easy so think I may stick with diet even it doesn't yield improvement, after all its very healthy, and I need all the help I can get!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Rob. Apparently it can take up to three weeks to start see a change.

I went gluten-free/DF at the end of Jan so was already on the right path and the diarrhea stopped almost immediately. Strangely though, since I started the SCD my 'movements' have changed again, almost going backwards.

My body will be going through a flux period until it starts to settle down and it is probably still offloading crud from the last 50 years and will be for a while. I know my liver had a good clear-out (I felt it and experienced the soreness for a few days!) about 2 weeks after I started the gluten-free/DF and undoubtedly there may be more to come!

This diet is so logical. Most of us consume way too much carbohydrate and our bodies just can't cope with it in that quantity. Sooner or later something's gotta give! It isn't just gluten - it's carbs per se and the quicker people realise and cut the carbs, the better they will be for it. I have noticed on this forum that so many who go gluten-free end up replacing the gluten with other carbs instead.

Back at the end of the 1800's it was realised that carbs were the problem - where did the Medical Profession go? They only picked up the gluten cot and walked with it - hence so many Celiacs and GI's who are still very poorly. How blind they still are.............

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have just tasted some of my first batch of 24hour yogurt. That has to be the best yoghurt I have ever eaten! It is fantastic!

I made it with full cream milk, half a pot of single (light) cream and a dash of double (heavy) and Total thick greek yoghurt as a starter. I did try to get my husband to have a taste but he just has a pathological and totally irrational revulsion - he has never tried it in all the years we have been married (well not to his knowledge anyway - if I use it in cooking I don't tell him and he will eat it, none the wiser!).

I told him it is like eating cream, but he still won't try it. Is that daft? Mind you, my mum used to make yoghurt when I was a kid and I couldn't stand that - it was always so sour. Now they use different cultures that don't create such a tart taste and it makes all the difference.

I definitely will be making that again. I have a little catarrgh after eating it so I suspect there is still a little stray lactose or casein in it, but it's not too bad and I am sure there is enough lactic acid in it to counteract that, and my stomach seems to be ok with it so far. I'm going to go and put some in a dish with some blueberries and honey. Oh yum.

I absolutely definitely will be making buckets of that now - the ironic thing is that I might end up having more dairy in the form of yogurt than I ever did with milk!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So your body seems to be able to handle the yogurt? I am dairy free as well and very skeptical about how I will feel with the dairy in this diet. Are you going to have the different cheeses that are allowed?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although I can't tolerate dairy per se, I did seem to be able to tolerate yogurt right through - although I was only having goat's yogurt. I decided to try cow's milk yogurt this week and bought some Total Greek yogurt, but my stomach definitely didn't like it very much.

However, when I made my first batch of 24hour yogurt I used the Total as a starter. I also used cow's milk and cream to make it with. Although I got a bit of catarrgh, my stomach has been fine with it. Apparently, the long culturing helps to really break down most of the lactose and casein, as well as creating a higher amount of bacteria, and also more lactic acid to mop up any stray lactose. That is why Elaine G recommends 'brewing' it for at least 24hours rather than the 6 or so that commercial producers culture theirs for.

As yet, I have not tried any cheese, but I am contemplating that. I might try some mild cheddar or goats' cheese first. I also want to try and get hold of some Curd cheese if I can. It is not readily available where I live although I can get medium-fat soft cheese, but I think it depends on whether it has been curded with rennet or has actually been cultured with lactic acid.

I found the book slightly confusing as although she refers to it as Dry Curd Cottage Cheese, here in the UK we either have Cottage cheese which is moist and lumpy, or Curd Cheese which is thick and smooth. I wonder if straining and pressing Cottage cheese would work just as well, or whether it would depend on the rennet/culture thing again? Unless it mentions it on the pack, how would I tell?

The other thing I find confusing is that she refers to 'Apple Cider'. Over here, Cider is an alcoholic Apple drink. In the UK Cider has been used to describe fermented apple juice for centuries. I suspect she means just plain pressed apple juice although I would be quite happy to imbibe the alcoholic one!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah I had the same thought, I settle with welch's 100% grape juice, apparently its got no added sugar so its all good.

As for dry curd cheese I didn't even bother looking, I doubt i'll find it. However as an alternative I can drain off yoghurt. Talking of which mine is ready in six hours!

My bowels has also definately changed, I'm curious as to where its going! Shock horror its been sometime since i've been worried about being bunged up!

How are you feeling fatigue wise? my energy levels took a real hit but are back on the way up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More pressing issue though, I cannot for the life of me find SSC legal vitamins? got some multi minerals but everything I look at has added starch, sugar, sweetner or soy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Supplements can be a minefield - there they are, supposed to be healthy for you and actually they can be full of rubbish too!

I'm not sure where you are. Here in the UK I buy Tesco's Complete for Women (although they also do one for Men which my Hub has found helpful) but if you are in the States I don't know what is available there. I was taking loads of different things, but then I worried that I might be unbalancing my body so I just restrict to the Multi at the moment and will watch out for any deficiency signs.

I found my energy levels did go up quite considerably after I went gluten-free/DF, and after a period of adjustment, but just as I was beginning to think I had cracked it I went down with a damn virus and was ill for over 2 weeks. Whilst it has all but gone, the energy hasn't come back yet, well not to the point it had got to. I do have more energy overall though than I have had for a long time as I can still run up the stairs - and that was something I hadn't done for a long time before the gluten-free/DF.

I have lost around 30lbs too, some of which was lost before my digestion collapsed in Jan and a few lbs since which does help. I think the energy level change with the SCD will be perhaps not quite so radical as with the gluten-free/DF as I was already part way there and my body is still trying to sort itself out. I have eaten something lunchtime which didn't agree with me very well - possibly the peeled raw apple - I usually know as my stomach gets uncomfortable and I get a dull ache/pain in my centre back. That tends to drain my energy - the digestion takes up a lot of energy and if it isn't working properly then fatigue will be the first symptom.

I fell down the stairs when my daughter was a baby and fractured my spine. I always thought the pain I used to get was to do with that plus the extra weight I was carrying (although I'm sure it didn't help!), but I now know it was to do with my digestion. At times I would get so tired and weak, it would take all my strength not to just lay down in the street where I was standing! I always wondered why I could do walking and sitting but I couldn't do standing!

How has your yogurt turned out?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tHIS MIGHT BE A LITTLE OFF THE SUBJECT BUT HAVE ANY OF YOU EVER WONDERED IF IT WASN'T GLUTEN THAT IS CAUSING ARE PROBLEMS, BECAUSE I WAS DIAGNOSED WITH CELIAC TWO YEARS AGO AND MY SYMPTOMS GOT BETTER BUT I WAS STILL HAVING PROBLEMS AND I NOTICED THE ONLY THING THAT WAS IN EVERYTHING I ATE WAS SOY...THE DOC JUST TOLD ME THATS NORMAL FOR SOMEONE WITH CELIAC TO HAVE MOREE THAN ONE INTOLERANCE BUT I SOON DEVELOPED A CARBOHYDRATE INTOLERANCE AND HAD ALL OF THE SAME SYMPTOMS I HAD THAT I THOUGHT I WAS GETTING FROM GLUTEN. I DECIDED TO START EATING GLUTEN AGAIN AND AVOID SOY COMPLETELY. mY SYMPTOMS ARE COMPLETLY GONE:) iF YOU LOOK AT ALL THE INGREDIENT LISTS OF FOOD WITH WHEAT THEY ALL HAVE SOY IN THEM ALSO. ITS JUST A THOUGHT BECAUSE IT WORKED FOR ME AND NOW I CAN EAT BREAD BUT IT IS SOY FREE AND I ALSO EAT SOY FREE CEREAL NOW. iF YOU ARE TO SCARED TO ADD GLUTEN BACK IN AT LEAST TRY AVOIDING SOY AND SEE IF THAT HELPS FIRST BECAUSE I HAVE HEARD THAT IT CAN ALSO FLATTEN VILLI. i ALSO AGREE WITH WHOEVER SAID SOMETHING ABOUT CARBS BEING A PROBLEM IN GENERAL. i STILL EAT VERY LITTLE GLUTEN BECAUSE SOY IS IN ALMOST EVERYTHING THAT GLUTEM IS, BUT I NOTICED THAT A LOW CARB DIET FOR ME REALLY WAS THE KEY TO MAKING ME FEEL BETTER.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes I'm from the uk too! so you say that tesco's own brand multi is ssc safe? (well safe enough without having to hound the manufacturer!)

My yoghurt turned out good, didn't actually have much of it as it all went into a savory cheesecake, which was good though the success was lessened because either a small amount of diary yogurt, or the grape juice upset my stomach. I've never had a real problem with diary bar the temporary intolerance that coeliac disease caused. though I am aware that diary is general bad news. I've also read a short piece from the coeliac doctor stating that the body will have an easier time digesting the fruit rather than a commercial fruit juice so I think I shall leave fruit juices for teh foreseeable future.

Thats an interesting experience you've had with soy there, 22222, I find it odd that you've been diagnosed with coeliacs but are able to tolerate gluten without soy. I suspect that you might have not been properly diagnosed and that your symptoms were simply soy intolerance? though you'd have to discuss that with your doctor. Personally I wouldn't go back to a normal diet even if I could, gluten is detrimental to 'normal' peoples health aswell as coeliacs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes I'm from the uk too! so you say that tesco's own brand multi is ssc safe? (well safe enough without having to hound the manufacturer!)

My yoghurt turned out good, didn't actually have much of it as it all went into a savory cheesecake, which was good though the success was lessened because either a small amount of diary yogurt, or the grape juice upset my stomach. I've never had a real problem with diary bar the temporary intolerance that coeliac disease caused. though I am aware that diary is general bad news. I've also read a short piece from the coeliac doctor stating that the body will have an easier time digesting the fruit rather than a commercial fruit juice so I think I shall leave fruit juices for teh foreseeable future.

Thats an interesting experience you've had with soy there, 22222, I find it odd that you've been diagnosed with coeliacs but are able to tolerate gluten without soy. I suspect that you might have not been properly diagnosed and that your symptoms were simply soy intolerance? though you'd have to discuss that with your doctor. Personally I wouldn't go back to a normal diet even if I could, gluten is detrimental to 'normal' peoples health aswell as coeliacs.

Hi Rob, I have just checked my husband's Tesco's Complete for Men (sorry, due to your name I am assuming you're a man!). I have noticed that it contains a little maize starch, sucrose and maltodextrin. I think some of these things are going to be very difficult to avoid one way or another. As it is only one tablet a day I would imagine that the amount is so small that it probably wouldn't impact too greatly. I have a job figuring out why they need to put sucrose and maltodextrin in them - normally they are swallowed so you wouldn't be able to taste it anyway!

If you find a better one let me know!

I did find that the yoghurt affected me a little. I have had some catarrgh with it so I'm thinking that either it needs 'cooking' for longer than the 24hours or I would be better off with goat's milk. I have found that I could tolerate commercial goats' yogurt far better than cows' so that may be the best way to go. I haven't got the 'cooking' off to a good start as I have a job to keep it warm overnight. Last night I put it into a slightly warm oven which hopefully got it going then popped it by the radiator when I got up this morning, but I reckon I will have to invest in a proper yoghurt maker so I can keep the temp even. If it hasn't cultured properly undoubtedly that would impact on the effect it has on me. It is delicious though.

Do you get backache when your stomach is affected?

I did us a chicken curry last night but used crushed cooked cauliflower instead of rice. It tasted ok but boy did we suffer after! Perhaps that was just one too many veg!

The cheesecake sounded good. I am having to avoid eggs at the moment as my stomach isn't coping with them very well, which is a bind as there are quite a few things I'd like to make that contain eggs. I made some blueberry pancakes for breakfast the other day using ground almonds and eggs and they were very good but my stomach wasn't at all happy after. Wouldn't it be good to just be able to eat without having to think about what might be a problem for the stomach! And then maybe it is combinations of different foods - someone was saying that he could eat toast and he could eat eggs, but he couldn't have eggs on toast!!!

I'm getting fed up having to think about food all the time!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was wondering what all of you are eating? Do you have to give up dairy all together if it doesn't bother you? I want to give this a chance, but I am not understanding everything yet. The only book I could find at the library was "Breaking the Vicious Cycle", is that the one you have?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Deb, yes that's the book.

I am slowly getting into the swing. It would be easier for me if I could eat eggs, but at the moment I am having yogurt and fruit, or fish, or even soup for breakfast. I would have an interchange of one of those or salad with chicken or turkey for lunch and a cooked meal for dinner with just meat, fish, or fowl and plenty of fresh vegetables - no potatoes, or grains. I had some more yogurt this evening with a few strawberries after my meal.

It is surprising how not being able to have eggs has limited my choice - even more so than gluten and dairy strangely enough as there is usually something I can rustle up with eggs. I did blueberry pancakes the other day for breakfast which were delicious made with grounds almonds, eggs, yogurt and blueberries, but my stomach didn't like the eggs at all.

Hopefully I will be able to cope with them eventually.

It is up to you whether you give up dairy or not, but it even though it may not be giving you any obvious symptoms it may still be feeding the bacteria you need to get rid of. Whilst you are still eating foods that feed the Candida you won't get any better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a slightly worrying problem in that the diarrhea that I had successfully got rid of when I went gluten-free/DF seems to have come back. Over the last 2 days my stools have changed back to the typical Celiac type, today culminating in the diarrhea - not sure if it is something I ate or a side-effect of the SCD.

I was on gluten-free/DF for just over a month then started the SCD a week ago. It could be my body having a clear-out - it could even be a reaction to the yogurt (I did eat about half a litre over the last few days), and when I had the diarrhea before I was still on dairy so that is a possibility. I will monitor this and let you know - if anyone is interested!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just found this quote on Pecanbread. I know it is aimed at kids but the principles can just as likely fit adults too.

Initial Reactions

Some children exhibit increased hyperactivity or aggression when they start the probiotics. Other children get digestive symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation, and light-brown-yeasty looking stools. You just have to keep experimenting with the amount, you might need to start out with a smaller dose if you get too many negative reactions.

- Maybe I did overdo it with the yogurt!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your reactions are perfectly normal, its caused by the 'die off' reaction of the bacteria living in your gut. When they die off they give off all their toxins in one go so it does worsen symptoms. When I started the diet I had D but it cleared up fairly quickly, well actually I had to go out at short notice, took lots of immodium and spent the rest of the week mildly bunged up!

As for backache I seem to get it generally, though specially when my guts are having trouble, I believe its the swollen bowels pressuring the spine (ooo that sounds fun!)

Well the dairy yoghurt really hasn't agreed with me! so either I'm not good with cows milk, or its the probiotic action of it thats upsetting me. I did seem to tolerate it better in the form of baked cheesecake. Its annoying as I seem to tolerate everything well, as I had a week of SSC legal fun, to break the diet in a bit softer I had lots of high calorie foods from the diet pages before easing into the strict starting diet and found that few foods really bothered me. But now i've got the yoghurt flowing i'm not feeling too sharp!

How easy is goats milk to obtain? i'm using uht diary milk at the moment as it doesn't require heating before its mixed with the commercial yogurt. Thats another thing, commercial goats yoghurt? I shall have to have look out for these.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure wheather to keep trying with the yoghurt in the hope of tolerating it better when I get used to it, but I worry that my symptoms with it may disappear, though it still does me harm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure whether to keep trying with the yoghurt in the hope of tolerating it better when I get used to it, but I worry that my symptoms with it may disappear, though it still does me harm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Rob. Goats' milk is now obtainable at most superstores, Tesco's, Sainsbury's, you name it. I would tend to use the whole milk rather than skimmed as I prefer the creamier taste but of course that is a matter of taste.

You should also be able to buy goats' yoghurt for a starter - St Helen's Farm brand is sold in Tescos and Asda and probably in others. I have also just discovered that whilst the Total Greek Yogurt I bought was cows' milk, apparently they also do goats' and sheeps' yogurt in Waitrose, Sainsbury's, Tesco and Asda and apparently some Co-ops although I have never seen it in our little local one (Wales is a bit too backwoods for that sort of thing - they did goats' milk for 5 minutes but it turned out to have been sent to them in error!).

Woodlands Sheeps' Milk Live Yoghurt is sold through the larger Sainsburys and some Morrisons stores; the Organic Sheeps' Milk Live Yoghurt is available in Waitrose and some Tesco stores south of Oxford and some smaller outlets. I have just called to ask if it is available in South Wales. I would love to be able to get hold of sheeps' milk - you would not think that to be a problem in Wales where there are probably more sheep than people, would you!

The instructions in the BTVC book says to not boil goats' milk but just heat it to 185 degrees. That is all very well, but it would mean having to have a cooking thermometer of some kind.

You are probably right about the die-off but starting the yogurt might also have contributed. It seems to be ok today thank goodness.

I don't know about it doing harm either. I know that many do find that they tolerate goats' milk much better than cows' milk anyway and I think sheeps' milk is better still so you may find that you cope better with yoghurt made from either of those much better than from cows' milk, I know I do.

To the question of why we tolerate goats' milk better than cows' I have extracted this from the St Helens Farm website - "Research has indicated that it has much to do with the protein structure in the milks. They are called caseins and the absence of aplha-s1 casein and a higher proportion of beta-casein in goats' milk means that the casein profile of goats' milk is closer to human milk than that of cows' milk. These proteins form a softer curd in the stomach and the fat particles are also smaller, which is a great aid to digestion for many who cannot tolerate cows' milk".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well after today I know its a big no to diary yoghurt, I may tolerate it better after some time but its not worth it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shame you have had a reaction to the yoghurt.

I find breakfast the most difficult meal - what do you tend to have a that time? When I was just doing plain low-carb, it wasn't a problem, but now I can't tolerate many foods I get a bit frustrated. Eggs are usually a big part of breakfast but they are not agreeing with me.

I am usually aware of my heart beating - there is a background thump all the time. I don't know why but it does seem to be more obvious when my digestion is not good. Not necessarily fast, but I am very aware of it, especially at night when I am trying to get to sleep.

I hoped it would improve with the gluten-free/DF diet but it doesn't seem to have made any difference. I hate this - it was bad enough not being very well or having much energy, but now I'm not very well, don't have much energy, and can hardly eat anything without having an almost permanent backache!

I have confidence that it will get better and will undoubtedly get worse before it gets better - but that doesn't make it any easier!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
0

  • Who's Online   6 Members, 1 Anonymous, 174 Guests (See full list)

  • Top Posters +

  • Recent Articles

    Lindsay Cochrane
    Living with Celiac Disease in South Korea
    Celiac.com 09/21/2018 - The English as a Second Language (ESL) pie is so large in countries such as South Korea that there seem to be enough helpings for anyone interested. However, these generous slices may be off limits to individuals with severe food allergies or intolerances, including those with celiac disease. If you have diet restrictions and are thinking of heading to South Korea or another Asian country, the following information will help you decide whether or not this move is a good idea.
    One might think that Asia, the land of rice-based meals, would be a celiac’s paradise. As one naïve dietician told me before I moved to Seoul, “You couldn’t be going to a better place.” This assumption could not be further from the truth. If cooked with traditional ingredients, many local dishes are gluten-free. However, in Korea, wheat flour is now cheaper than other kinds of flour, despite the fact that it has to be imported. Wheat flour and barley are currently the two most common ingredients in Korean food products.
    In Korea, eleven major food allergens must be included on product labels: poultry eggs, milk, buckwheat, peanuts, soybean, wheat, mackerel, crab, pork, peaches, and tomatoes. As for anything else, the Korean Food and Drug Administration states that only the five major ingredients in a product have to be labeled. Furthermore, a label need only include intentional ingredients, not things accidentally mixed into a product through cross-contamination. So you can say goodbye to warnings like: “this product may contain traces of peanuts.” Stricter labeling regulations will be put into effect in September 2006. However, these laws will remain less stringent than those in North America and Europe. According to a source at the KFDA, labeling restrictions are similar in Japan and more lax in China and South East Asia.
    One can easily learn Korean for “I’m allergic to ____” in any phrasebook or from a Korean coworker, friend, or even the guy in the next seat on your Korean Air flight. Yet it is the cultural barrier, not the language barrier, which poses the most difficulties for a celiac.
    Korean culture revolves around the sharing of food due to food shortages during the Japanese occupation; Koreans do not ask, “How are you?” but, “Have you had your meal?” Co-workers, friends, and even the occasional stranger will offer to share food. The politest way to refuse is by saying, “Thank you, but I can’t. I’m allergic.” Also, rather than saying you are allergic to something in Korean—allerugi—it is much more effective to say you cannot have it. (see the list of useful phrases). Unfortunately, even these statements are unlikely to be fully effective when eating Korean food. Many Koreans are completely unaware that frequently-used ingredients such as tashida soup flavouring and soybean powder contain wheat.
    Most Koreans I spoke with were shocked to hear that, as a celiac, I could not eat food which had so much as touched gluten. Generally, they assume that people with food allergies are still able to consume a product with a 1-2% trace of the allergen. Food allergies, celiac disease, vegetarianism, and other kinds of diet restrictions are rare in this country and are not taken very seriously. Furthermore, according to gastroenterologist Dr. Kim of Severance Hospital in Seoul, only two people were ever diagnosed with celiac disease in Korea.
    The world of North American restaurants, where servers cater to those with food allergies, food sensitivities, and plain old picky eaters, is very far away. Koreans generally order what is on the menu without making any special requests. Even Westerners who learn enough of the Korean language to explain their diets often end up being served something they asked specifically not to have. Furthermore, Korean food is not served on personal plates: everyone at the table reaches his or her chopsticks into the various communal dishes, causing cross-contamination.
    I was at a restaurant with some Korean friends and was trying to explain my gluten-intolerance to them, when one young man told me he was so sensitive to peaches that he could not so much as touch a peach without breaking out into a rash. Five minutes later I saw him eat a dish containing peach slices. This is the attitude of Koreans to food allergies—both theirs and yours.
    The gluten-free meal which is safest and easiest to find in Korea is samgyupsal. This dish features fatty, thick slices of pork cooked over a clean grill right at your table. Just make sure that all sauces are kept off the grill. Bibimbop is a rice, vegetable, and egg dish usually served with kochujang, a red pepper paste which unfortunately contains wheat. Bibimbop can be ordered, however, with the kochujang on the side.
    Most foreigners are in Korea to work rather than visit, and having an apartment provides the extra advantage of having one’s own cooking space. There are a few of us who have managed the gluten-free diet in Korea. However, it has not been easy. If you have celiac disease or food allergies and are thinking of moving to this part of the world, I can guarantee you that it will be a monumental challenge.
    Useful Korean phrases:
    Thank you, but I can’t. I’m allergic: kamsa hamnida man, allerugi issoyo. I cannot have barley, rye, or wheat: chonun pori hago homil hago mil motmuhgeyo. Barley: pori Wheat: mil Rye: homil Bibimbop with the red pepper paste on the side: bibimbop kochujang garu Grilled Pork: samgyupsal

    Jefferson Adams
    What’s the Deal with Gluten Sniffing Dogs?
    Celiac.com 09/20/2018 - Some people with celiac disease experience extreme symptoms when they eat gluten. These folks adopt various strategies for navigating the world. One of those strategies involves getting a gluten-sniffing service dog.
    We’ve done a few stories on gluten-sniffing dogs over the years. Dogs like Zeus and Hawkeye are famous for helping their owners sniff out gluten before they can eat it.
    Can Gluten-Sniffing Dogs Help People with Celiac Disease?  The stories are always popular. People love the stories, and people love the dogs. After all, pretty much anyone with celiac disease who has ever read about gluten-sniffing dogs would love to have one. Who could say no to a warm, fuzzy dog that can take a sniff of your food and signal you when it contains gluten?
    The stories almost always generate plenty of feedback and more than a few questions. To answer some of those questions, we’ve decided to do an article that provides some facts about gluten-sniffing dogs.
    Here are a few factors to keep in mind about gluten-sniffing service dogs:
    Gluten-free Dog Status:
    One thing to remember is that proper gluten-sniffing dogs are professionally trained service animals, much like seeing-eye dogs or hearing-ear dogs. 
    As professional service animals, the dogs must be trained and certified as service animals. The dogs may then accompany their master pretty much anywhere they go, and are available to assess all food and snacks.
    Gluten-free Dog Training:
    Proper training takes time, which equals money. Professional trainers might only train one or two dogs, and the training can take about a year. There are very few trainers for gluten-sniffing dogs, and there are also currently no official guidelines or certification.
    Gluten-free Dog Cost:
    In our recent story on the gluten-sniffing black Lab, Hawkeye, we noted that the dog cost $16,000, not including food, and vet bills. 
    Gluten-free Dog Reliability:
    Nimasensor.com notes that “[g]luten-sniffing dogs may detect gluten in amounts as small as .0025 parts per million with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy.”
    The Mercola.com website says that Willow, a gluten-sniffing German shorthaired pointer in Michigan, can detect gluten with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy. 
    Read more on gluten-sniffing dogs:
    Gluten-Sniffing Dogs Are Game Changers for People With Celiac Disease Gluten-sniffing dogs help people with celiac disease What to Know About Gluten-Sniffing Dogs Gluten-Sniffing Assistance Dog Helps Celiac Sufferer Lead Normal Life

    Jefferson Adams
    The Girl Scouts Adds New Gluten-Free Cookie to Popular Lineup
    Celiac.com 09/19/2018 - Great news for gluten-free cookies lovers!  Girl Scouts has announced the debut of a new gluten-free cookie to its enormously popular cookie brand. 
    The new Caramel Chocolate Chip is a chewy cookie that contains caramel, semi-sweet chocolate chips, and a hint of sea salt. also happens to be gluten-free. The new gluten-free treat will be available in select areas during the 2019 cookie-selling season; which typically runs from February to April each year.
    The gluten-free Caramel Chocolate Chip joins the Girl Scouts’ two other gluten-free offerings: Toffee-tastic, a buttery cookie with sweet and crunchy golden toffee bits, and Trios, a peanut butter oatmeal cookie with chocolate chips. 
    The Girl Scouts of America has been around for over 100 years and now hosts more than 1.8 million girl members. Every year, about 100 million scouts between the ages of five and 18 sell approximately 200 million boxes of cookies nationwide. According to the Girl Scouts website, that money stays local to develop local leadership training activities, summer camps, and more activities.
    According to a 2016 study conducted by the Girl Scout Research Institute, approximately 85% of Girl Scouts surveyed said that Girl Scout Cookie Program helped them learn how to set goals and meet deadlines, while 88% said it helped them become effective decision-makers. Another 88% said they learned how to manage money, while 94% said the program helped them to learn business ethics.
    The Girl Scouts have also added online sales and iOS and Android apps that allow people to find cookies or order from their phones.

    Jefferson Adams
    No Gluten-Free Diet for Tennis Champion Roger Federer
    Celiac.com 09/18/2018 - With a number of major tennis stars singing the praises of a gluten-free diet, including top players like Novak Djokovic, Swiss great Roger Federer weighed in on the topic.
    The 20-time Grand Slam winner says that he’s never tried the gluten-free diet, and that he doesn’t not “even know what that all means…I eat healthy, and I think that's what people should do, too, if they have the options. It's sure important the right diet for an athlete.”
    Djokovic, the 2018 US Open winner has been gluten-free since 2011, and calls the diet his biggest key to his success.
    For Federer, diet is helpful, but not the whole story. “[Diet] can help you, you know. I mean, I think every athlete should be in good shape. I don't think we should have any fat athletes, to be honest. We do too much sports and we should be too professional to let that happen to ourselves.
    If it happens, well, we should wake up. You don't have the right entourage. They're not telling you that you're a bit fat. Players try different things, and whatever works for them. I do my thing. It's been very easy and natural and healthy, and it's worked.”
    So, while Novak Djokovic, and a number of other athletes, have gone gluten-free and continue to tout the benefits, look for Federer to remain faithful to his generally nutritious non-gluten-free diet.
    Read more at: TennisWorldUSA.org

    Connie Sarros
    All About Eggplant
    Celiac.com 09/15/2018 - People have a love/hate relationship with the purple fruit called ‘eggplant’. Eggplants, first cultivated in southern India and Sri Lanka, are also known as aubergine, Guinea squash, melazana, and ‘poor-man’s caviar’. Like potatoes they are members of the nightshade family, and despite the fact that we all consider eggplant to be a vegetable, biologically it is defined as a berry, and therefore it is a fruit.
    When selecting the fruit, select ones that are firm to the touch, have a smooth and shiny skin and are heavy. Avoid those with brown or soft spots and have a dull color. Gently push with your thumb or forefinger. If the flesh gives slightly but then bounces back, it is ripe. If the indentation remains, it is overripe and the insides will be mushy. If there is no give at all, the eggplant was picked too early. Once you bring it home, avoid placing it near tomatoes and apples, as they give off a gas that quickens the ripening process. Try to use the eggplant within two days of purchase.
    There are several cooking hints that will make your ‘eggplant experience’ more tasteful. Do not cook this fruit in an aluminum pan as it may cause discoloration (both of the pan and the fruit!). The skin is edible on small, younger plants, but should be removed on coarser, older ones. Once you cut the eggplant and cook it right away because the flesh will brown (similar to cut bananas). This fruit absorbs oil very easily, so it is recommended that you coat the slices with cornmeal before frying or baking. To help reduce the bitter flavor in older plants, ‘de-gorge’ the eggplant—Slice the eggplant into ½-inch pieces, salt well, then weigh down each slice in a colander to allow the liquid to drain out of the eggplant for 30 minutes—then rinse with cold water and pat dry.
    Equivalents and Nutritional Value—one pound of eggplant equals 3½ cups of diced eggplant and 1¾ cups cooked eggplant. One medium eggplant weights about 1 pound. It contains vitamin C and potassium, has anti-bacterial and diuretic effects, as well as flavanoids (cancer fighting antioxidants). One cup cooked eggplant contains 25 calories.
    The different ways to prepare eggplant are limited only by your imagination. Cut it into matchsticks to add to a stir-fry. Cube it for vegetable stews (Ratatouille). Shred it to make fritters, or puree it for a hummus-style dip. You can also slice it lengthwise and grill it.
    This fruit is probably most famous for the Italian rendition of Eggplant Parmigiana. But the Greeks have taken this dish one step further, ‘Moussaka’. If you have never eaten this, it is a delight to savor. Lean ground beef may be substituted for the ground lamb. Three zucchini may be used in place of the eggplant (if you prefer). Even if you hate eggplant, you will love Moussaka.
    The beauty of Moussaka is that this casserole may be made in advance, then covered and refrigerated overnight, or covered with foil and frozen—before you bake it (thaw in the refrigerator completely before baking). Time is precious for us all, and this concoction does take some time to assemble, but every moment is worth it. This makes an impressive side dish for company, it is perfect for a buffet table, or it can be used as a main dish for a family dinner.
    The following recipe is from my “Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook”. Traditional Moussaka is ‘loaded’ with calories and fat and cholesterol. This version is lower in calories and fat without sacrificing any of the delicious taste.
    Moussaka (Greek Casserole Dinner)
    Ingredients:
    1 large eggplant, peeled 2 teaspoons olive oil 1 large onion, chopped ½ pound lean ground lamb 5 teaspoons tomato paste ¼ cup white wine ¼ cup chopped fresh parsley 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon 18 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon pepper 1 tablespoon margarine 1 ½ tablespoon cornstarch 1 cup scalded 1% milk 1 egg beaten until frothy 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg ½ cup gluten-free lowfat cottage cheese 1/3 cup gluten-free corn muffin crumbs, dried 1/3 cup Parmesan cheese, shredded Directions:
    Preheat broiler. Cut the peeled eggplant lengthwise into ½-inch thick slices. Spray both sides of the slices with gluten-free nonstick spray; set on a broiler pan and broil until browned, turning once. Preheat oven to 350F. Heat olive oil in a skillet; add onion and sauté until lightly browned. Add the lamb and cook, breaking meat up with a fork, for 10 minutes or until the meat is browned. In a small bowl, stir together the tomato paste, wine, parsley, cinnamon, salt and pepper; add to the meat and simmer, stirring frequently, until all liquid has been absorbed. Remove from heat. Melt the margarine in a medium-size saucepan; blend in the cornstarch with a whisk. Slowly stir the hot milk into the cornstarch; cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until thickened. Cool slightly, and then stir in the beaten egg, nutmeg, and cottage cheese. Spray a 9-inch square pan with gluten-free nonstick spray. Sprinkle the bottom lightly with 2 tablespoons of the corn muffin crumbs. Arrange alternate layers of eggplant slices and meat mixture in the pan. Sprinkle each meat layer with the Parmesan cheese and remaining corn muffin crumbs. Pour the cottage cheese mixture over the top. Bake 45 minutes or until the top is golden. Cool slightly before cutting. Makes 6 (4 ½ X3-inch) serving.

  • Posts

    • Did the do the full panel? How long were you eating gluten, as you have to be eating it every day for about 8 weeks (6-12 depending on source of info) There are several blood test, and some celiac test negative on them but test positive on the biopsy via a endoscope.
      https://celiac.org/celiac-disease/understanding-celiac-disease-2/diagnosing-celiac-disease/screening/
      https://celiac.org/celiac-disease/understanding-celiac-disease-2/diagnosing-celiac-disease/diagnosis/
      Post your results if you can, with ranges.

      Did they run scopes on both ends checking for other conditions, crohns, colitis, Ulcerative Colitis, IBD, etc? 

      Could be many things, floating is just a sign that the fats in the stool are not breaking down completely more of a intolerance issue related to enzymes not breaking down foods OR foods passing through the system too fast and not breaking down.
    • I've been  getting  gluten intolerance/celiac   symptoms    and  I was so certain  it was  from gluten and  whenever I cut out gluten   I feel better . I  had my blood tested (I was eating  gluten at the  time)  and i just got  a  call that it come back clear ,today is  a bad  day  all around as I had been incredibly careful what I ate  but have had dirrahea  today .I cant seem to  go more than  3 days in a row   having normal stools then I'm back to  where I started.  I know this sounds stupid but I was hoping with everything  it came back positive as I'm absolutely terrified that its something more serious like cancer.  I'm 35 and  am pretty healthy (or so I thought  )  I'm not bloated all the time  my stomach is flat in the  morning  but it for sure  seems food that is causing the  issue  .I don't  really eat dairy . It may be worth knowing that both my grandma and mother  suffer with occasional  "poop problems" such as dirrehea  , Could  we all have the same illness that hasn't been diagnosed? Can people suffer from loose bowels with no real cause ? My  poop sometimes floats  I've read that can be  due to an intolerance  but I just don't know what  😕 I'm not really sure why I'm posting here giving the fact my test come back negative but I'm absolutely beside myself over what else it could be  . Any advice ,suggestions or guidance will be very much appreciated 
    • Glad you took it the right way :), sometimes the internet makes tone hard to convey. I think it is tough because people with other medical dietary restrictions (eg. anaphylactic peanut/nut allergies) tend to be able to eat out pretty normally. I know many people with such nut allergies, and honestly some of them don't even mention it at restaurants/catered events (not something I would recommend - just reporting what I've seen). I think this sets a precedent in the mind of many newly diagnosed celiacs, as well as the general public about the ability of restaurants to deal with allergies/celiac. I think the thing that is forgotten is that peanuts are not used in the same way that wheat is, making it a lot easier to minimize risk of CC in most types of restaurants. That, and because awareness of peanut allergies has been "a thing" for ~25 years, there is a lot less superfluous use of peanuts/nuts in foods. When I was a little kid, you'd find bowls of peanuts at the bar, but that is not a thing now. Hopefully celiacs will get to the level of being automatically thought of in food/restaurant situations, but today is not that day.
  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      110,947
    • Total Posts
      952,682
  • Blog Entries

  • Topics

  • Blog Statistics

    • Total Blogs
      1,144
    • Total Entries
      1,971
  • Upcoming Events

×