Jump to content
Celiac Disease FAQ | This site uses cookies GDPR notice. Read more... ×
  • Sign Up
0
bahrbdoll

How Did You Start Your Diet

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

So after gluten-free 3 mo. at advice of nutritionalist (she really never said how to start, just eliminated all gluten) -

Gastro Dr. no help after neg blood tests. I just started eating gluten-free foods- mostly those that said gluten-free on the label.

How did you start?

Did you stop eating everything and slowly add things in 1 at a time?

I'm seeing improvement but still having problems and still taking 3 antidiahreal meds daily.

Where do you go to check medications?

I would also appreciate any advice on brand names of foods/beauty that are gluten-free.

I am sick of reading labels for now- I need a break- ANY and ALL suggestions/info/comments/replies appreciated

Thank you all very much

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We started very simply. We ate very little pre-packaged gluten free foods at first and just concentrated on lots of fruits and veggies, lean meats,and brown rice. none of that required any label reading! (although I did check our salad dressings.)

Next we added things like gluten free breakfast cereal and pizza crust mix and homemade rice flour crackers. More recently brown rice pasta (Tinkyada).

That's about it...we're still new at it too. And yes sometimes the label reading either tries my patience or overwhelms me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started out very simply because I didn't have the rescources to buy processed foods. In hindsight, I think that is the best way to start. Give yourself a good foundation and later build from it. It's less stressfull than learning an entire new way to eat, socialize, buy food and cook all at once. Buy and prepare simple whole foods in your own kitchen with single ingredient spices. When you have mastered that and are feeling good, then add in new foods, one at a time every few days. Keep a food journal. Many of us have other problems with other foods that crop up later and the diary is a great way to figure those out.

You said you are still not feeling totally well. You could be getting gluten in your diet still. You seem to be eating processed foods, is that right? Lots of those have very small amounts of gluten in them, it's legal, and the sensitive will react to that. If you cut down to a whole foods diet for awhile, you should be able to tell if that's true for you. Yes you need to check all your meds and supplements. I don't know if you're eating dairy but that's something most of us have a problem with at first. You might want to let it go for a bit.

Hope this helps!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yup - reading labels is time consuming and tiring, so - as much as possible - pick whole, unprocessed, naturally gluten free foods. cooking doesn't have to be complex at all, but use whole, natural fruits, vegetables, legumes, rice/corn, meats, etc. sure, I used a few packaged items - gluten free soy sauce, spices, and hot cereal - but not many.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, don't forget to go gluten-free in your cooking equipment - if you have a toaster oven, it may be permanently glutened (although some folks swear by toaster bags, that could work). Do a search on these forums for "gluten free kitchen" or "pots and pans" and you'll find lots of good advice.

I agree with the stick-to-whole-foods approach at the start. Labels can get so overwhelming! Not so bad if only reading one or two per trip to the store, but more than that can make my head spin ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

We are on week three and I am getting tired too. I have heard that it can take quite a while for the small intestine to recover, months, so you still may find relief on that side. Watch out for hidden gluten. I worry that you might be getting some oats or barley malt in your diet that you don't know about, which is giving you symptoms.

I find that I have to do a lot of my own cooking and with three gluten free kids and the dear spouse and a full time job, I ain't sitting around watching TV anytime soon.

The concept I go with is that prepared foods except for yogurt and potato or corn based foods are off limits. It's probably better for us that I cook more from scratch anyway.

For my sake I shop a lot at the local rice bakery, which because we live in a big city, is available.

I'm trying to make it fun for myself but you've been on the diet a lot longer, and I can appreciate that it gets old by 3 months out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The concept I go with is that prepared foods except for yogurt and potato or corn based foods are off limits. It's probably better for us that I cook more from scratch anyway.

Watch out for yogurt! In reading labels I found some brands that did have gluten listed as an ingredient.

I would not make a blanket statement about all potatoe or corn based foods either. My daughter has bought some snack foods, but only ones that state they are gluten free.

me, I'm sticking to baked potatoes and corn on the cob.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been gluten-free for a little over a month, and I started by only eating like 5 foods. Tomatoes, chicken, popcorn (air popped only) for snack, blueberries and strawberries. I know it sounds like I was starving myself but I had to be super strict at first. After about 3 weeks, I started eating all other veggies and fruits (raw fruits, or boiled veggies with just sea salt and pepper) and bland meats, plain chicken, plain ground turkey etc... I feel satisfied when I eat, but I still have symptoms. I was told it will take 6 months of full gluten-free to feel recovered :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am trying to send a message to you regarding your posts, but your personal messenger is disabled. If you will enable it to allow pms, I have some info to share with you :D

Janie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm taking a friend to the grocery store this weekend who has to go gluten-free. My own odyssey started when I broke my leg and found out I had osteomalacea and multiple vitamin and mineral deficiencies - after 14 years of going to doctors trying to manage my "IBS" and "gastritis" and "esophagitis", "ulcers"... etc. I've been gluten-free for a year and a half and it is overwhelming at first to know where to begin. First you have to get over the denial part, and just accept that you need to go without gluten. Easier said than done, I know, but there are worse things in life. If you're still having symptoms after 3 months I'd say cut out any dairy and yeast and soy for awhile, too, and see if that helps. I went dairy and yeast free at first, but now I don't have to. I haven't had a yeast infection in over a year, that hasn't happened in 40 years.

I very rarely buy prepared gluten-free foods anymore - they're nearly always over my budget. The bread is especially disappointing. Bob's Red Mill makes good gluten-free flours for making your own bisquits and cornbread, pizza crust, etc. Some of them are surprisingly delicious and when you add butter or toppings you won't miss the "wheat" thing. If you are craving cake - look for a "death by chocolate" recipe online. Non-celiacs love it too. If you really need crackers (my downfall), Mary's Gone Crackers are a nice earthy flavor for creamy cheeses, and I always keep a bag of plain tortilla chips and plain veggie chips on hand.

The produce and meat sections are nearly all gluten-free. Things to watch out for in produce are: bottled dressings, egg roll wrappers, sushi, packaged salads and nuts and other snacks with seasoning on them.

In the meat section be especially careful of marinated meats and pre-seasoned chicken and fish. (the same is true of restaurants - things like brisket and fajitas can be full of soy sauce and therefore gluten)

In frozen foods, nearly all packaged foods with sauces have gluten in them, also be careful of innocent-looking precooked chicken and other meats. They're frequently coated with soy sauce to give them that appetizing look. Also be careful of grilled chicken salads at fast food restaurants for the same reason. At Mexican restaurants I stick to ranchero chicken, which is stewed. (And don't you hate those places that bury the dang croutons in your salad?)

Even tho rice and potatoes are safe, if they're convenience packaged with seasonings and sauces they're likely full of gluten. Most Campbell and Progresso soups and other soup mixes are off limits, but they are usually clearly labeled and some are fine. I've found that with gluten-free broths I can make better soups than anything that comes out of a can. I just avoid convenience foods in general these days, and try to think positively about all the chemicals and preservatives I'm not eating! (but believe me I still have nightmares and wake up in a cold sweat thinking I'm about to bite into a large hoagie..)

Hope some of this helps. I know it's hard, but your body is definitely worth it and it gets easier as you go. I used to live off Immodium and Zantac and Levbid and anti-inflammatories. Now I don't even have to take BP medicine anymore. I'm down 20lbs and I take an aspirin and vitamins every day, and that's it!

Best of luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am trying to send a message to you regarding your posts, but your personal messenger is disabled. If you will enable it to allow pms, I have some info to share with you :D

Janie

Could you please tell me how to do that- thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Could you please tell me how to do that- thanks

Actually, I don't think you've been on long enough to use the private messenger. I think you need to have made 50 posts to use it. Maybe a mod can chime in here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am trying to send a message to you regarding your posts, but your personal messenger is disabled. If you will enable it to allow pms, I have some info to share with you :D

Janie

Sorry I suck so badly at this- I got your message, that sounds unreal- I thought my story was bad, I can't even imagine! I didn't want to write you back with all my info incase you already read it- but if you haven't, I posted it on sept 1st @ 1041 a.m.- let me know what you think- about ALL OF MY ISSUES :rolleyes: Thanks so much for all of your help, Bahrbdoll

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
0

  • Top Posters +

  • Upcoming Events

    • February 27, 2019 04:00 PM Until 08:00 AM
      0  
       
       
       
      Celiac Emotional Healing Support Group
       
       
       
      Again you are invited to join Johnny Patout, LCSW for Baton Rouge's first emotional healing support group meeting to assist those living with celiac disease manage the emotional challenges so many of us face. Most often the emotional disturbances include depression, disinterest in normal activities, insomnia, grief, mood changes, anxiety, inability to concentrate, extreme concern about managing a gluten-free lifestyle and other emotional and behavioral challenges.
       
      The professionals at Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center created the emotional healing support group to give us a safe place to begin to process our emotions and support each other as we heal emotionally while managing celiac disease and the resulting autoimmune disorders.
       
      The emotional healing support group meets every Thursday, 6:00-7:00pm, at the Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center of Baton Rouge. Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center is located at 4637 Jamestown Avenue, Baton Rouge, Suite B-1. Suite B-1 is upstairs.
       
      The support group is free and open everyone managing celiac disease. For more information: emotionalhealingforceliacs@hotmail.com
    • March 24, 2019 Until March 27, 2019
      0  
      NEW ORLEANS GOURMET GLUTEN-FREE mini GETAWAY    March 24 ~ 27, 2019   We have arranged a fun and Gluten-free food filled mini in the city known for it's food and fun.  We have arranged to eat many of the famous dishes that aren't usually Gluten-free at a few of the World Renown restaurants.   Staying at the Royal Sonesta Hotel on Bourbon Street in the center of the French Quarter, you'll be able to enjoy the ambiance of the city at all hours.   Our itinerary will include a Luxury Coach tour of the city and surrounding area - Admission to The National World War II Museum, including the Tom Hanks" 4D film "Beyond All Boundaries" - an exciting Airboat ride and tour through the Bayou.      This it the 3rd time we have visited New Orleans and it has always been well attended, so join us even if you've been there before.  Check out our website for the complete itinerary and cost.    Due to contractual obligations we must have 20 participants by October 31, 2018 to make this a go.      If you have any questions just give us a call at 410-939-3218.  Bob & Ruth info@bobandruths.com (410) 939-3218
    • March 30, 2019 Until March 31, 2019
      0  
      Nourished Festival is a family-friendly event with 10 locations across the US. Attendees will be able to sample food, health and beauty products, meet with companies, learn about the most current food lifestyles, receive coupons and attend educational sessions with industry experts. 
      Nourished Festival, managed by The Nourished Group and presented by Enjoy Life Foods, is the largest gluten-free, allergy-friendly and specialty diet event in the US, with 10 locations including.
      ABOUT THE NOURISHED FESTIVALS
      Managed by The Nourished Group, formerly The Gluten Free Media Group, The Nourished Festivals are the largest and fastest growing special diet consumer events in the United States. Started in 2007, the events have expanded from one to ten cities throughout the country. The festivals cater to anyone looking to lead a healthier lifestyle or those who follow a specialty diet due to autoimmune conditions, food sensitivities, allergies or intolerances. Offerings including Paleo, Keto, Plant-Based, Gluten-Free, Allergen-Friendly and Nut-Free products. The events provide the opportunity for attendees to sample and purchase new products, receive coupons, meet with brand ambassadors and attend educational classes with industry experts. For more information, visit http://www.nourishedfestival.com 
       
×