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bahrbdoll

Wondering If Anyone Has Had Gastric Bypass Surgery

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Just wondering if anyone has had gastic bypass? I already have so many dietary issues, not really sure what else I could/should be doing differently. Nobody in my area has any experience with someone being post bypass and celiac

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I would think taking some vitamin supplements and probiotics would be good for you. You should try Kefir.

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Have a friend who's had one. I've been trying for years to get her to try a gluten free diet. She doesn't see it because "I don't have the runs all the time". I'd think with gbs you'd be more likely to develop it because the stomach is breaking down the food items for digestion as well as before surgery.

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Dont want to put you off but I have heard they are dangerous.

I heard lap band surgury is much safer.

I considered them but then realized if I went to a party or something I still wanted the ability to indulge myself and this lead me to the conclusion I didn't need surgery I just needed to get tough and pull some sort of minuscule bit of self discipline from myself.

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I've considered having the lap band. I was on a DR lead diet for a while and lost a little weight, but seemed to struggle with every ounce. I was told that if I were to have the surgery, I would benefit more from the bypass just because I struggle to lose anything...even with strict calorie restrictions and daily exercise.

I'm just starting the process of diagnosing of Celiac and was told to go ahead and start a gluten free diet. I'm heading into my second week and am already feeling more energy and have lost a little weight too. Hoping that continues! :D

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Just wondering if anyone has had gastic bypass? I already have so many dietary issues, not really sure what else I could/should be doing differently. Nobody in my area has any experience with someone being post bypass and celiac

I will be having lap-band on Nov 9th. Right now I am starting to shop around for gluten-free protein shakes to get me through the 1 week before surgery and the 2-3 weeks after in order to meet my goal of 70 grm of protein a day. I briefly discussed being celiac with the surgeon. He had no concerns but his office is one that literally bangs into your head the importance of vitamins and nutrition for everyone. I have had 3 classes, a book, a test, etc over the last month getting ready for surgery.

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Just wondering if anyone has had gastic bypass? I already have so many dietary issues, not really sure what else I could/should be doing differently. Nobody in my area has any experience with someone being post bypass and celiac

Yes...I am almost 5 years post sx. & had always suspected as far back as 15 years ago that I might have had this problem. However no one would listen to me. I too cannot have the biopsy. But let me tell you I have been following the Gluten Free diet since April of this year and I feel so much better! The side benefit was another 20 lb. weight loss.

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Bahrbdoll,

I'm a retired RN, age 65. I am recently diagnosed with celiac disease, even though my biopsies were negative. Back in the late 80s I had a vertical banded gastroplasty. The surgery formed a very small pouch at the junction of my esophagus and upper stomach. The small pouch forced me to eat small amounts, or suffer vomiting spells. The point of this surgery was to limit intake without bypassing any part of the digestive tract. Below the pouch an "outlet" was constructed that allowed small amounts of food to pass slowly from the pouch to the rest of the stomach. The modern lap band surgery is very similar because it limits intake, slows emptying time, and allows the entire digestive tract to work on the food taken in. Bypass surgery also forms a small pouch to receive food but then the food is redirected to a point fairly low down in the small intestine. Because the ability of the small intestine to break down the ingested food is greatly reduced, all the food taken in is not completely digested. The large bowel plays a much smaller role in absorption than the small bowel. The fats that aren't properly broken down in the small intestine, when dumped prematurely onto the large intestine often causes diarrhea. The patient is expected to modify his/her diet and eat less fat and sugar.

Celiac disease decreases the small bowel's ability to properly digest food and in some ways accomplishes the same result of a bypass. Either way, nutrients, especially vitamins and other essential nourishment is decreased. Both celiac patients and bypass patients will have to find a way to replace essential vitamins and minerals or become malnourished.

Now, for the part the head plays. I was 228 pounds when I had my surgery. I quickly dropped to 140 and I was thrilled. However, the mechanical changes in my digestion and absorption did nothing for my obsessive desire for favorite foods and as I learned just how much was too much (too much and I vomited) I learned how to "eat around" the gastroplasty. All I did was eat small amounts almost constantly. As soon as the pouch emptied, I ate again. I made decisions to eat the food I craved rather than the healthful food I needed. I also stopped drinking enough. I can't eat and drink at the same time or I will vomit. Given the choice of eating or drinking, I almost always chose eating. Within 10 years of the surgery I went up to 247 pounds-- and I am only 5'2"! I finally tried counseling with a PhD psychologist and that didn't work. What did work was becoming diabetic. I am fortunate to be able to require only oral medication at this time. Over two years I have managed to drop to 199. I am not really good about following the diabetic diet, but I do take it easy on food enough that my morning (fasting) blood sugar is below 100. This is the number that is the cut off for "normal" blood sugar. Diabetics have blood tests every 3 months called an A1C and it measures the average blood sugar for the previous three months. My doctor is happy if the report is in the low 7s. Last time I was 6.9.

I really don't like gluten-free baked goods and that is also helping me to watch my weight. In the evening I am tormented wanting to constantly graze on "ggod" food, meaning sweet and fatty stuff. Without a stash of "real" baked foods I am forced to eat fruit (in no way what I really want) or go without. The celiac diet is helping me in this way.

Having a bypass may be healthy for you in some ways because you will probably have lowered blood pressure, cholesterol and triglycerides. However, it won't be good for you because you will lose essential nutrients. First---I strongly advise you to consult your doctor/s about the surgery. The surgeon may or may not be very enlightened regarding celiac nutritional needs. I assume you celiac doctor is a gastroenterologist. If he/she isn't, you should probably also consult with a GE. Finally, my advice would be to opt for the lap band because it allows your food to pass through your entire digestive tract. A bypass won't.

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