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Any One Hv To Drop Out Of School To Get Better?

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Hi I was diagnosed in august and been gluten free for six weeks. I am still learning what I can and can't eat. It's taking a while. Did any other college students hv to dropp classes or stop going to school because of their symptoms? Just wondering cause I see alot of post where people are able to continue one way or another with being productive through the day and accomplishing things but for me it's different. Brain fog, fatigue, Weakness, eating every two hours, anxiety, and depression holds me back. It's frustrating for me because I'm not used to feeling like this I am usually a the opposite from this. It'd be nice to hear other stories of how recovery went when you first found out. If you had a hard time. Basically right now all I do is stay home rest watch tv, read, play games, research celiac, and cook sometimes when I feel good. It's such an up and down thing. Feel good then feel crappy. I really love to draw(fine art major) but the brain fog messes me up can't even think of simple things being creative usually comes instantanious but it's a stuggle right now. Iv written off the "arist block" cuz it's jut been so long. Anyway if anyone else in college feels the same way or going through similar things it'd be nice to hear from ya.

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Hi I was diagnosed in august and been gluten free for six weeks. I am still learning what I can and can't eat. It's taking a while. Did any other college students hv to dropp classes or stop going to school because of their symptoms? Just wondering cause I see alot of post where people are able to continue one way or another with being productive through the day and accomplishing things but for me it's different. Brain fog, fatigue, Weakness, eating every two hours, anxiety, and depression holds me back. It's frustrating for me because I'm not used to feeling like this I am usually a the opposite from this. It'd be nice to hear other stories of how recovery went when you first found out. If you had a hard time. Basically right now all I do is stay home rest watch tv, read, play games, research celiac, and cook sometimes when I feel good. It's such an up and down thing. Feel good then feel crappy. I really love to draw(fine art major) but the brain fog messes me up can't even think of simple things being creative usually comes instantanious but it's a stuggle right now. Iv written off the "arist block" cuz it's jut been so long. Anyway if anyone else in college feels the same way or going through similar things it'd be nice to hear from ya.

I had to drop out. I got through 2 1/2 years of college and the doctors visits, inability to get out of bed, ER visits, depression/anxiety, inability to sleep/sleeping all the time... it just got to be too much. I did not even know what my problem was until a little more than a year after I quit school. But, in retrospect, leaving school was the best thing I did -- but this is just in my experience. After quitting school, I got a job that started out part time and eventually I started working full time. My boss has been extremely understanding when it comes to my health.

There is no definite answer to your question - take the time to get better. No two people are the same in this situation - what worked for me may not necessarily work for you. Some take longer to feel better while others feel better the next day. It took me quite a while to be functional again - but I did get there :)

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I am a college student and I fill for you. Celiac can be hard enough and to add the demands of school with teachers who do not understand it makes life hard! I have had Celiac for 8 years but a year ago I got really sick and had to sit out a semester. I do not regret taking the semester off. I was able to get my health in check and focus on school better when I returned.

I would take the time to let your body heal if its a possibiblity if not try taking part time hours while you are figuring out your body.

Things will get eaiser I promise!!

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I had to drop out. I got through 2 1/2 years of college and the doctors visits, inability to get out of bed, ER visits, depression/anxiety, inability to sleep/sleeping all the time... it just got to be too much. I did not even know what my problem was until a little more than a year after I quit school. But, in retrospect, leaving school was the best thing I did -- but this is just in my experience. After quitting school, I got a job that started out part time and eventually I started working full time. My boss has been extremely understanding when it comes to my health.

There is no definite answer to your question - take the time to get better. No two people are the same in this situation - what worked for me may not necessarily work for you. Some take longer to feel better while others feel better the next day. It took me quite a while to be functional again - but I did get there :)

thanks for shaing your experience with me. It puts my mind at ease. It is difficult to do both and I didn't want to give in but I think that I might. So I can focus on my health. I guess I'm a little scared bout dropping because I hope that I'll be able to go back to school. I want to accomplish something but maybe that something isn't school right now. Iv been in and out of school because of the mysterious sumptoms of celiac and depression before I figured out what was making me sick. Kinda sucks that I hv to sit on the sidelines for a little longer while I heal:) one day at a time right? ;)

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I am a college student and I fill for you. Celiac can be hard enough and to add the demands of school with teachers who do not understand it makes life hard! I have had Celiac for 8 years but a year ago I got really sick and had to sit out a semester. I do not regret taking the semester off. I was able to get my health in check and focus on school better when I returned.

I would take the time to let your body heal if its a possibiblity if not try taking part time hours while you are figuring out your body.

Things will get eaiser I promise!!

I totally see your point. I'm prob gonna drop and take care of myself. It will be one less thing that I hv to worry about while trying to heal. :) did you hv a hard time deciding if you should sit a semester out? Or where you ok with it at the time?

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thanks for shaing your experience with me. It puts my mind at ease. It is difficult to do both and I didn't want to give in but I think that I might. So I can focus on my health. I guess I'm a little scared bout dropping because I hope that I'll be able to go back to school. I want to accomplish something but maybe that something isn't school right now. Iv been in and out of school because of the mysterious sumptoms of celiac and depression before I figured out what was making me sick. Kinda sucks that I hv to sit on the sidelines for a little longer while I heal:) one day at a time right? ;)

Exactly. The myriad of complications - ie, depression, anxiety - that come with celiac disease is really what kept me down. My doctors thought I had bipolar disorder, yet it was what the medications did to me that made them realize that it was something else. Eventually after I had searched high and low for a solution, I mentioned to my doctors celiac disease and was eventually diagnosed.

The anxiety is really what made school that much harder for me.

I hope you start feeling better soon :)

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My parents had to convience me that it would be smarter in the long run to sit out. Which makes sense I wouldn't have been able to do the quality of work or make the grades I needed in the shape I was in, it was hard to grasp at first but when you think about it, the choice to sit out take care of yourself and come back healthy and ready makes great sense.

Hope that helps.

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Hi I was diagnosed in august and been gluten free for six weeks. I am still learning what I can and can't eat. It's taking a while. Did any other college students hv to dropp classes or stop going to school because of their symptoms? Just wondering cause I see alot of post where people are able to continue one way or another with being productive through the day and accomplishing things but for me it's different. Brain fog, fatigue, Weakness, eating every two hours, anxiety, and depression holds me back. It's frustrating for me because I'm not used to feeling like this I am usually a the opposite from this. It'd be nice to hear other stories of how recovery went when you first found out. If you had a hard time. Basically right now all I do is stay home rest watch tv, read, play games, research celiac, and cook sometimes when I feel good. It's such an up and down thing. Feel good then feel crappy. I really love to draw(fine art major) but the brain fog messes me up can't even think of simple things being creative usually comes instantanious but it's a stuggle right now. Iv written off the "arist block" cuz it's jut been so long. Anyway if anyone else in college feels the same way or going through similar things it'd be nice to hear from ya.

I graduated from college a couple of years ago -- and I tell you this to give you hope! I was diagnosed last March with Celiac and have been on the gluten free diet since. I have always been an artistic, creative person. I love to draw, color, paint, write poetry, short stories, etc... There was a period of time for about 8 years I just could not do those things. I could not concentrate or think long enough to come up with a cool, creative idea. I would just end up getting frustrated and giving up. It was actually really awful. Since being gluten free now since March, I have noticed it getting progressively better. I actually finished my first creative short story a month ago since about 9 years ago... I have started drawing again and I'm actually thinking about writing a creative book for kids with Celiac and illustrating it myself. Trust me, the fog does lift! I promise. It takes a little time, but it does go away and it's amazing how good you feel.

Anyway, back to the college issue... I did okay my first year in college -- not great, but okay. I spent a lot of time by myself in my dorm room because my stomach hurt so bad every day, I was in a bad mood, irritable, couldn't think, couldn't sleep. I was depressed, had trouble studying and reading. I decided to switch schools to be closer to home because I'd been feeling so bad all the time. Well, I came back closer to home and I completely flunked out of school that whole first semester. I just could not make myself get up in the mornings nights after I'd been sick (Which was most nights). I hurt all the time, my muscles ached, I couldn't think, couldn't eat, I was so weak and tired and sad. Well, I got some counseling for the depression issue and that definitely helped some. The next semester I took one class. That's it. Just one. I made myself give everything I had to that one class. I ended up getting a B in it. I decided to take more night classes because they were only one night a week generally and the teachers were a little more understanding about if I had to miss classes. Something that might help you, too, is taking online classes if your school offers them. These allow you to not have to actually go to class. They are SO NICE when you feel so bad! You can just sit at home and do your work on the couch. If you're not feeling good all day long but you find that at 8 pm you feel good enough to do some work, you can do it then. If you wake up at 2 am and can't sleep but feel like working on school, you can do it then. I think online classes are a great way to go for people like us who cannot always plan on making ourselves attend classes.

Hope some of that helps! And don't give up on the creativity! The world needs more creative people!! I've found that it is helpful for me to share my creative poems and drawings with people I Trust --- they give me positive feedback, which makes me feel good, and it makes me want to keep trying! And by the way, taking primarily night classes and online classes, I was able to graduate in about 5 years from college with my undergrad degree and a GPA of 3.8. So, it is possible!!!

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Hi I was diagnosed in august and been gluten free for six weeks. I am still learning what I can and can't eat. It's taking a while. Did any other college students hv to drop classes or stop going to school because of their symptoms? Just wondering cause I see alot of post where people are able to continue one way or another with being productive through the day and accomplishing things but for me it's different. Brain fog, fatigue, Weakness, eating every two hours, anxiety, and depression holds me back. It's frustrating for me because I'm not used to feeling like this I am usually a the opposite from this. It'd be nice to hear other stories of how recovery went when you first found out. If you had a hard time. Basically right now all I do is stay home rest watch tv, read, play games, research celiac, and cook sometimes when I feel good. It's such an up and down thing. Feel good then feel crappy. I really love to draw(fine art major) but the brain fog messes me up can't even think of simple things being creative usually comes instantaneous but it's a struggle right now. Iv written off the "arist block" cuz it's jut been so long. Anyway if anyone else in college feels the same way or going through similar things it'd be nice to hear from ya.

I am so excited to read this because I can relate 100%. I dropped out of high school and got my GED. This was because I had Celiac Disease and did not know it at the time. I can struggling right now to finish my application to college right now (i'm 17) and it is a college i absolutely love. I just want to feel normal. I love drawing too and I too cannot write off this artistic block nonsense anymore. it's not that i don't have ideas ...i have no energy to do or make anything. i am functioning at a minimum and i am always in pain. why do we have to sound insane?

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Hi there everyone. I had to drop out of college too because my symptoms were so bad. I was lucky though to have finished a whole year with good grades, but was feeling terrible. Many days I would dread going to class to sit there knowing that I would get sick to my stomach and have to leave the room. I lost like 20 pounds and was thin to begin with. I had bad anxiety to go along with it. So yes, I feel it was a good lesson as to what is really important in life. Overall the whole school thing doesn't matter in the long run. If you feel you are too ill to do it, then just give it a break for a while. I wish I had done it sooner than I had. I think the stress really began to trigger the symptoms even more. And now, three years on into being gluten-free, I am back in college. And so what if I am 23? Hey if that's how long it takes you then big deal. Your health is so much more important!

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Wow! Thanks so much for the replies! It's such a reliefs to know that I am not alone in this decision making process. It really helps to hear your experiences and storys of what you've gone through or are going through. Thank you! :)

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My parents had to convience me that it would be smarter in the long run to sit out. Which makes sense I wouldn't have been able to do the quality of work or make the grades I needed in the shape I was in, it was hard to grasp at first but when you think about it, the choice to sit out take care of yourself and come back healthy and ready makes great sense.

Hope that helps.

Yes that does help. Thank you:)

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I was in a similar situation a couple of years back. I got really sick when I was in my fourth year of university, trying to complete my thesis. The pain and nutritional problems were bad enough, but the brain fog really messed things up. I kept going and didn't tell anyone at uni how sick i was, and I didn't do anywhere near as well as I know I could have. The marks I got that year have made it more difficult to progress in my field. In hindsight I wish that I had at least applied for special consideration for the thesis, as it was definitely not up to the standard of my work from previous years.

There are many people here who have already shared their experiences, I would just add that it may be worth informing your course coordinator or someone in administration that you are intending to defer your studies for medical reasons. This could make a difference to how easy it is for you to resume your studies, or how easy it is to get those subjects/work credited to you if you study elsewhere later.

I hope you start feeling better soon, and don't be afraid to give yourself some time to heal. Like me you may be amazed at how much your health is affecting your work, I didn't realise how sick I was until I started to get better.

Sophie

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If at all possible, don't drop out! I know that is much easier said than done, though. I just graduated with my Bachelor's Degree a couple months ago and am now gearing up for Graduate School. I know what you mean about being in a brain fog and having anxiety/depression issues in addition to feeling crappy all the time, and I know how difficult all of that can be when you're trying to concentrate on school and make decent grades. I lived with all of this the entire time I was in college. I was diagnosed during my sophmore year of college, and I struggled with the disease for years before the doctors ever figured out what was wrong with me. In addition to celiac, I have also had several pretty severe medical problems throughout the last few years, to include pancreatitis, which has caused a lot of issues for me. I've had a few different surgeries all for completely different and unlreated issues, all of which have really nothing to do with being celiac. Throughout these ordeals, especially through surgeries and severe sicknesses, I had to really dig deep and pull my strength from deep within as well as from my support group, my family. I perservered through all of it and never had less than Dean's List every single semester I was in college, and graduated in December cum laude.

While it was difficult and challenging at times dealing with everything and tackling all of my coursework, I did it because I stuck with it. I realized that because of all I was dealing with, I just had to work harder, probably harder than everyone else, but I did it and achieved academic excellence because of it. Sure, there were times I was very sick from celiac or the other things I was dealing with and I felt as if I would never graduate or do much of anything else, and I felt like the last thing I wanted to do was homework or studying. Last summer, I had half of my thyroid removed beacuse there was a possibility that I had cancer in it, and I had to worry about that in addition to taking a full course load that summer as I did every summer. I still had to write term papers while in my hospital bed, still studied through long nights at the hospital, and still had to drag my butt into class when I felt like complete and total crap. I can totally commiserate with you and it because I have been there a lot myself that I can tell you to stay positive, focus on your classes, and work even harder towards your goals. No one said it was going to be easy, but it is definitely well worth it. When I'm feeling particularly sick, I look at my diploma and contemplate how hard I had to work to get that degree and how far I have come, and it makes me feel very proud. Another option you should look into is whether or not your university offers any online classes or hybrid classes which enable you to do most of your classwork online and attend class only a few times throughout the semester. I had the luxury of taking some online classes at my university, which definitely helped me throughout being so sick. I wish you well and lots of luck, and I hope that you start to feel better. Just hang in there as long as you can because it will get better. And you can remind yourself that things could always, always be much worse. Good luck.

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I had to take a quarter off last year and I will again if I have to (knock on wood.) The depression is the worst; feeling crappy made me want to stay in my room all the time. I stopped going to class, then I stopped going to the dining hall, then I stopped leaving my bed...

I'm back in school this year. The hardest part is the social aspect; I wish I had taken a year off before going to college, because leaving in the middle of freshman year makes it so weird with your friends on campus. Luckily mine were all very understanding and I hang out with them this year now that I'm back, but still, it's best to get it sorted out before the term starts so you can enjoy school without interruptions.

But that being said when you're not right you're not right and you have to take as much time as you need to get there.

-Jesse

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Hey!

I was diagnosed with Celiac's the DAY I arrived at college. Literally was in the car pulling up to the university to move into the dorms when I got the call from the doctor at home, confirming that my biopsy was positive. I didn't even know what gluten was at that point. I thought it was going to be easy, just to steer clear of bread and pasta and cereal, and I would be fine. Obviously, that's not what happened.

I started class just like everyone else, tried to live a "normal" life, but the adjustment to the Gluten Free lifestyle, as well as being a freshman in school hundreds of miles from home became to much for me to handle. I was very fatigued all the time, body-aches/headaches, brain fog, constantly hungry, depressed, and still experiencing bloating and abdominal pain. I gained 15 pounds in 8 weeks, although I was barely eating. My hair was falling out, my skin was breaking out, and I would wake up every morning in pain. It was a huge effort to find gluten free food, and when I did accidentally ingest gluten, I was bedridden for at least 48 hours. In spite of this, I was getting good grades, so I choose to stick it out. But as weeks went by, I became very depressed. After two months of suffering, I made the choice to do a medical withdrawal, and dropped out.

I had to come home to get the medical care I needed. I went to school totally unprepared. Now that I am home, I am able to see a nutritionist and a specialist to help me cope and get educated about celiac's. It was a really tough decision to make. But I need time to recover and get healthy!

So far Ive been home for three days. I already feel much better, as I have time to sleep, take vitamins, and prepare healthy meals that I know are 100 percent gluten-free.

Having to drop out does suck. and feeling crappy all the time sucks too. But the good news is, that we are young. and we have time on our side. I know that in a few months ill be back and healthier than ever before, and so will you!

get better first, go to school when your ready! Its very possible to go to school and be gluten-free. u just have to be prepared.

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If at all possible, don't drop out! I know that is much easier said than done, though. I just graduated with my Bachelor's Degree a couple months ago and am now gearing up for Graduate School. I know what you mean about being in a brain fog and having anxiety/depression issues in addition to feeling crappy all the time, and I know how difficult all of that can be when you're trying to concentrate on school and make decent grades. I lived with all of this the entire time I was in college. I was diagnosed during my sophmore year of college, and I struggled with the disease for years before the doctors ever figured out what was wrong with me. In addition to celiac, I have also had several pretty severe medical problems throughout the last few years, to include pancreatitis, which has caused a lot of issues for me. I've had a few different surgeries all for completely different and unlreated issues, all of which have really nothing to do with being celiac. Throughout these ordeals, especially through surgeries and severe sicknesses, I had to really dig deep and pull my strength from deep within as well as from my support group, my family. I perservered through all of it and never had less than Dean's List every single semester I was in college, and graduated in December cum laude.

While it was difficult and challenging at times dealing with everything and tackling all of my coursework, I did it because I stuck with it. I realized that because of all I was dealing with, I just had to work harder, probably harder than everyone else, but I did it and achieved academic excellence because of it. Sure, there were times I was very sick from celiac or the other things I was dealing with and I felt as if I would never graduate or do much of anything else, and I felt like the last thing I wanted to do was homework or studying. Last summer, I had half of my thyroid removed beacuse there was a possibility that I had cancer in it, and I had to worry about that in addition to taking a full course load that summer as I did every summer. I still had to write term papers while in my hospital bed, still studied through long nights at the hospital, and still had to drag my butt into class when I felt like complete and total crap. I can totally commiserate with you and it because I have been there a lot myself that I can tell you to stay positive, focus on your classes, and work even harder towards your goals. No one said it was going to be easy, but it is definitely well worth it. When I'm feeling particularly sick, I look at my diploma and contemplate how hard I had to work to get that degree and how far I have come, and it makes me feel very proud. Another option you should look into is whether or not your university offers any online classes or hybrid classes which enable you to do most of your classwork online and attend class only a few times throughout the semester. I had the luxury of taking some online classes at my university, which definitely helped me throughout being so sick. I wish you well and lots of luck, and I hope that you start to feel better. Just hang in there as long as you can because it will get better. And you can remind yourself that things could always, always be much worse. Good luck.

When I was first diagnosed I hated the diet. I refused to believe it so I was sick a lot and missed a lot of school. Even 3 years later during my last years of high school I got sick from random cross contamination(probably should have been more careful). My teachers never understood because I never told them. I was embarassed. One of my teachers was the softball coach and I was out supporting old teammates when I ran into him. The games were for the high school team over spring break and I had missed most of the week before. So of course I got those curiously judgemental looks for being there. My mom instantly went up to talk to him because he was one of my favorite teachers and started telling him about my disease. From then on he always understood. So if you are having trouble try talking to your professors. I don't know what your college is like but the one i'm attending right now is amazing. If you are a good student then your professors will more than likely try and work with you. But if you still can't handle it because of being tired and other symptoms then take a semester off. I had to drop my first semester and now I have straight a's. Its not really about when you get school done but with what quality you get it done

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Hello Shess0816!

This is an true OMG moment!

So, for four years, all of high school, I lost all artistic ability too! I couldn't imagine for 8-9 years though, that must have been terrible.

I couldn't even doodle, and who can't doodle?! Anyway, I am super excited because about a month ago, it all came back and it makes me sooooo deliriously happy!!

Back to the issue, yea, I would take a semester or so off. Since this happened to me in high school and not college, I can't be THAT reliable but I know what it's like. How you feel so blinded by the depression, brain fog, anxiety, grayness, pain, tiredness, and uselessness. I feel so blessed to be where I am now.

I have to go, but I'll pray that you find the answer. Just take time to heal and eventually, it comes full circle :)

Anna

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I am trying to do my best so I don't have to. But my symptoms are getting worse, and my grades are suffering.

I am trying not to, though!

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Hi I was diagnosed in august and been gluten free for six weeks. I am still learning what I can and can't eat. It's taking a while. Did any other college students hv to dropp classes or stop going to school because of their symptoms? Just wondering cause I see alot of post where people are able to continue one way or another with being productive through the day and accomplishing things but for me it's different. Brain fog, fatigue, Weakness, eating every two hours, anxiety, and depression holds me back. It's frustrating for me because I'm not used to feeling like this I am usually a the opposite from this. It'd be nice to hear other stories of how recovery went when you first found out. If you had a hard time. Basically right now all I do is stay home rest watch tv, read, play games, research celiac, and cook sometimes when I feel good. It's such an up and down thing. Feel good then feel crappy. I really love to draw(fine art major) but the brain fog messes me up can't even think of simple things being creative usually comes instantanious but it's a stuggle right now. Iv written off the "arist block" cuz it's jut been so long. Anyway if anyone else in college feels the same way or going through similar things it'd be nice to hear from ya.

I dropped out of school for a semester. My confusion got so bad that I couldn't remember my way to a complete sentence, much less pass an exam. I'm about to go back in the spring.

I'm also a liberal arts major (Literature & Writing) and I absolutely understand what you mean when you say the fog and the exhaustion makes it impossible to think creatively. Heck- it makes it hard to think logically.

If you have the resources, taking time off sounds like really good idea, so long as you spend that time actively trying to get better. It's MUCH better than flunking out or not learning what you need to know to be successful.

Hmm... Also, from one creative person to the other- DON'T stop creating while you take a break. You'll get rusty. Draw your computer screen if you have to, draw your bed, draw whatever. Depression can come really easily to new Celiacs, and creating should help.

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I am a mom of a gluten intolerant and am one also. For two years my kid has tried to be gluten free in college. Now that she is in the dorms and has a kitchen she still can not get off meal plan because she faild a blood test. but she does get sick by eating in the caf as hard as she tries. Sad as it makes me from reading your posts I can see how maybe she will not make it though the next two semesters. Perhaps the answer is a lighter load in college and cooking her own meals even though she has to pay for the caf also. Two years and I am still geting a handle on eating gluten free, but my life could not go on hold 100% for that whole time. I was lucky and could put my life on 60% hold while working this out.

Every semester she wants to drop out. I am frustrated in my inabilty to help her as a mom. Part of me wants her to finish school now before she moves on to other things and part of me wants her to have less stress so she can get a handle on this. I don't think there are any right answers to this question. I guess it is what she can live with.

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I started University September 2008, and was all gungho until I started to get extremely sick. Before that everything was at the point of managable, but by mid November I couldn't go to class anymore, I couldn't even get out of bed. I had moved out mid October into a student house...but had to move back in with my parents in case I had to go to the ER again. I lost alot of weight because I stopped eating, and couldn't keep down what I did it. There was alot of bleeding, and depression, and so on. It was horrible. I did a medical withdrawl days before exams. I took the rest of the year off, my parents who haven't always been the most supportive (doctors said there was nothing wrong with me) made me get a job which was...awful, and probably did alot more harm than good. But I moved out again in August and started school again, except at art college. I've been gluten free for almost two months now and its getting better all the time.

I really struggled in two classes last semester though, so I've got a reduced courseload this semester, only 5 classes instead of 6. I qualify as a permanent disability (for everything all together) so I am able to make up the class I dropped over the summer with only a small administrative fee.

Taking time off was the best thing for me. I got alot better, and finally figured out what was wrong.

one more mile, you should help your daughter get in contact with the health center at her school, or the disability center, something like that. Finding the right person makes a huge difference in getting the help you need. I started seeing (yet another) new doctor at my school this past september, and its made a huge difference. He got me into the disability center, so I quality for exceptions, and things to help me deal with my teachers and missing class for illness or appointments. They might be able to help you get your daughter out of the mandatory meal plan, its unfair that she has to pay for it when she cannot eat anything there. Maybe getting in contact with the right person can help you, try contacting people at the school until you find the right person.

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I didn't drop out, but I did start the gluten free diet in my last semester of college. Boy that was a fun semester. Went gluten-free, had a near stress-breakdown of sorts (not that I think it's connected...although who knows, maybe it secretly was? never thought about that before)... and then 33 people get shot/murdered on my campus....and then that was the end of college. Riight.

Anyway. My gluten-intolerant condition definitely worsened when I was in college. The gluten 'attacks' began trickling in during high school, making me miss maybe a day or two. But in college...it got worse and worse which is why I eventually reached the point of despair and went for the gluten free diet as a last resort.

Despite it worsening, I was still able to attend my classes and get good grades and whatnot. In my case...in college, you may have one to four classes a day, with time in between, so it gave a lot of wiggle room for my "attacks." I missed maybe a few classes as a result. But I had the strong notion that I had no idea how I'd be able to hold down a full-time, 9-5 kind of job with that condition. At its worse, even something as slight as getting up earlier than I was used to could trigger an attack. Slight stress could trigger an attack. I could manage it in college, but there's no way I could avoid it with a full time job. You know? I was beginning to worry. But thankfully I figured out the problem in college, before going into the working world.

When I started my job two years ago, I remember being VERY aware of how impossible it would have been had I not figured out the problem and still been suffering from the gluten intolerance. Again, slight stress, getting up earlier, being expected to be at my boss' beckon call when she needs me...there's no way I probably would have been able to kept the job. Even if my boss had tried to be sympathetic. Just being stranded at a desk 8:30 - 5:30p.m....probably at least once a month I'd have to miss work, maybe even at crucial and important events that might have more stress...yeah. Not sure how I would have done it.

So...do what you have to do to get better and I wish you luck in the future. Trust me, you'll be thankful when you do get a f/t job...you'll realize how impossible it would have been without the diet. It may have a difficult social drawback in college, considering most on-campus food is not gluten-free-friendly, and if you wanna hang out with friends on the fly, be prepared to be sitting there starving a lot. I certainly didn't have an abundance of friends, but even at that rate, I noticed it. Lol. But in the end...it's really worth it. So, hang in there. :/

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I am a mom of a gluten intolerant and am one also. For two years my kid has tried to be gluten free in college. Now that she is in the dorms and has a kitchen she still can not get off meal plan because she faild a blood test. but she does get sick by eating in the caf as hard as she tries. Sad as it makes me from reading your posts I can see how maybe she will not make it though the next two semesters. Perhaps the answer is a lighter load in college and cooking her own meals even though she has to pay for the caf also. Two years and I am still geting a handle on eating gluten free, but my life could not go on hold 100% for that whole time. I was lucky and could put my life on 60% hold while working this out.

Every semester she wants to drop out. I am frustrated in my inabilty to help her as a mom. Part of me wants her to finish school now before she moves on to other things and part of me wants her to have less stress so she can get a handle on this. I don't think there are any right answers to this question. I guess it is what she can live with.

Keep pushing the administration--they have to provide accommodations, even if blood tests are negative. Find one doctor who can write her a note and that can be used as a way to force the issue with your administration. I have celiac, but my original tests were lost years ago; my admin said, "Oh, we have no reason to let you off the meal plan." My response was, "I am a liability: if you keep making me ill, I will sue. And I will win." It took two weeks of arguing, but "liability" sunk into their heads. So did "sue".

The only reason why I can keep functioning is that I cook for myself and have for the past two or three months. Before that, I was sick consistently.

For me, I didn't have to drop out for a semester or two, but I did contemplate it. However, I'm a junior--the finish line is in sight.

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