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KristyUK

Need Something Gluten Free, Dairy Free And Preferably Withouth Nuts For Breakfast...

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Agh. I am having no problem really with suddenly going gluten and dairy free, except for breakfast. I need to have a high protein intake in my diet as I crash and burn on carbs all too easily. Since starting this new way of eating 11 days ago, I have been eating a lot of nuts, especially at breakfast - generally some fresh fruit (but no bananas, they don't agree with me) and a handful of almonds/cashews/brazils/pecans/walnuts. I love it, BUT I am really wary of creating a nut intolerance, by having so many.

I get zero time in the morning (up at 5.15am) to cook, so I usually have a piece of fruit and some nuts almost as soon as I fall out of bed and then repeat this, but on a larger scale, when I get to work.

Does anybody please have any ideas? I don't eat any of the special gluten-free stuff as I'm trying to just eat natural food at the moment. I also can't take soy/rice milk (don't ask).

I love nuts, but I am worried that I will soon have to cut them out of my diet before too long.

Thank you!

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My dd loves breakfast burritos on white corn tortillas. Make them with anything you like. Precook meats and keep in baggies in the freezer. Prepare veggies ahead of time. Cook extra hashbrowns. Save leftover meats from dinner.

Beans-any kind

meats-any kind

hashbrowns, leftover potatoes of any style

scrambled eggs

fresh veggies-onions, avocados, tomatoes, peppers, etc.

salsa fresh or store bought

chili

leftover taco toppings

meat, eggs, beans and potatoes are filling

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I vary between a number of things, and here are a few:

* rice cakes with peanut butter - these are portable/briefly storable if you wrap them in saran wrap and stick 'em in the fridge

* fruit and hard boiled eggs (make a half dozen on the weekend and you're good for three breakfasts)

* coconut milk yogurt (soy is an option if you can have it) with a generous serving of hemp seeds on top

* fruit smoothie with rice or hemp protein powder (takes about 5 minutes from cabinet/freezer to sink/nalgene bottle if you've got a milk sub and frozen fruit on hand)

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Thank you both! I guess it's me just having to get used to not eating typical breakfast-type foods any more. I've steered away from rice cakes for now as cooked rice justs makes me blow up like a balloon in any case (not sure why!), but I have eaten them quite a bit in the past.

Eggs - I love them, but now that I've cleared all the gluten and dairy out of my diet, I find hard-boiled ones cause me real problems, although I'm fine with any other method of cooking!

It's funny, I was always the kind who would try anything - my parents took me to an Indian restaurant when i was 7 and the waiters were all stunned to see me tucking into anything that they put in front of me (this was the 70s!). Now, all of a sudden I feel what it must be like to be a 'fussy eater'.

I do love the idea of chili for breakfast though... mmm!

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Have you tried the new coconut kefir? The strawberry is decent--the vanilla needed something.

Is it the casein in the milk that gives you problems or just lactose? I can still drink milk based Kefir and eat yogurt. The proteins are broken up in the process of making it.

The envirokidz barz are good.

Nuts

OJ

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It's the casein....

And to be honest, now I've been doing some reading about how de-natured our milk is these days, I wouldn't go back to it if I could!

Thank you!

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Thank you both! I guess it's me just having to get used to not eating typical breakfast-type foods any more. I've steered away from rice cakes for now as cooked rice justs makes me blow up like a balloon in any case (not sure why!), but I have eaten them quite a bit in the past.

you could also use corn thins (like rice cakes, but made out of corn) or even apples. (apples and peanut butter are a very common snack around our house!)

leftovers for breakfast are *great*! I will probably have leftover mediterranean lentil soup for breakfast. :)

one other thing - you can get hot cereals, and make them at work if you have a microwave. I use a combination of millet grits (which can be hard to find, but you can use other things like quinoa flakes), those hemp seeds again (love 'em as a source of protein), flax meal, cinnamon, and a bit of sweetener (agave, stevia, brown sugar - whatever you like). heat (carefully, it likes to bubble over) in the microwave with a milk sub, and you're ready to go. (oh, you ask how is this easy to do at work? make a big bag of the dry ingredients, keep a bowl, a measuring cup, a bottle of agave, a spoon, and a box of almond milk in the fridge. while your computer boots in the morning (well, mine always had so much corporate software that even if it was a soft boot it took forever), or the like, measure out cereal and 'milk', and put in the microwave. boom - breakfast to eat over email. :P btw, I found that doing something like 5 min at 50% power (microwave experience may vary) let it get enough "bubble" to cook, but not leave a mess to clean in the microwave). nuts and dried fruit also work well in this cereal.

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My favorite slow cooker book, NOT YOUR MOTHER'S SLOW COOKER, has some recipes for savory rice porridges. These are nice because you make them up the night before, and you wake up to a ready-made hot breakfast! Perfect if you have no time in the morning, but you have some time the previous evening to prepare.

JOOK (Chinese Breakfast Rice Soup)

serves 4-6, cooks on LOW for 8-9 hours (so can be put in the night before)

1 cup Calrose rice (medium grain) or a premium Japanese rice like Nishiki

2 tbsp vegetable oil

10 cups chicken or turkey broth (could sub veggie broth)

2 tsp salt

abt 1 tbsp finely chopped cilantro stems

1 cup plain soy milk (optional) [and this really is optional, so leave it out if you can't tolerate soy]

FOR SERVING:

Chopped fresh cilantro leaves

Minced green onions

Oyster sauce, soy sauce*, and/or any hot pepper sauce such as sriracha or Tabasco

*[wheat free of course!]

1. Wash the rice in a colander until the water runs clear. Soak in water to cover about 30 minutes.

2. Meanwhile, heat the oil in the slow cooker set on HIGH.

3. Drain, rinse, and drain the rice once more. Add the rice to the hot oil and cook, stirring, until the rice is well coated and smells toasty, about 5 minutes. Add stock all at once, then the salt and cilantro stems. Stir well, turn the cooker to LOW, and cook, 8-9 hours, or overnight.

4. To finish the jook, stir it well because the liquid and rice may have separated. If you want your jook thicker, turn the cooker to HIGh, cover, and cook for 1-1.5 hours more, stirring now and then. The soup will become thick and white. Add the soy milk, if desired, for an ultra-creamy consistency.

5. To serve, set out small bowls of cilantro leaves, green onions, oyster sauce, soy sauce, and hot sauce.

-----------

There is another version of this, Congee, that is even simpler:

serves 4

3/4 cup Calrose rice (medium grain) or a premium Japanese rice like Nishiki

8 cups water or vegetable broth

1 tsp salt

For serving:

Oyster sauce and/or soy sauce

Hot pepper sauce, such as Tabasco

1. Wash rice in a colander until the water runs clear. Soak in water to cover for about 30 minutes.

2. Drain the rice, then place the rice, water, or broth and walt in the slow cooker. Stir well, cover, and cook on HIGH for 30 minutes to 1 hour to bring to a boil.

3. Turn to LOW, cook for 7-8 hours, or overnight.

4. Stir the congee well. If the rice is not thick and creamy, turn the cooker back to HIGH, stir well because the liquid and rice have separated, cover, and cook for another 30 minutes. The soup will become thick and white. Serve with condiments.

-------------------------

I love this slow cooker book. Very, very few of the recipes need any alteration for gluten-free living.

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Hard boiled eggs are great! Before I developed the egg allergy, I bought 2 dozen at a time, boiling one dozen. I would mark the boiled ones or tint them lightly with food coloring or leftover Easter egg dye so I knew which ones they were.

You could make a frittata or something similar of eggs with some veggies and/or meat. Cut in wedges and eat cold or put in the microwave.

You might also try chia seeds. They are very high in protein. You mix with water and put in the fridge the night before. They form a gel. Can be eaten as is, mixed with applesauce or put in a smoothie.

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Thank you all - certainly some great ideas there! I do love apple and peanut butter - I am just wary of eating too much in the nut department!

The fritata idea is a great one - sadly no microwave, but I'd be very happy to eat that cold for breakfast! Yum!

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Once or twice a week I will have a scrambled egg and sausage patty for breakfast.

Sometimes oatmeal with a bit of milk, and brown sugar or honey.

This morning I had two small pancakes made with Gluten Free Pantry Brown Rice & Pancake mix. I couldn't tell the difference between them and regular pancakes.

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one thing I'll do is make a whole bunch of pancakes on the weekend, and freeze some. zap 2 or 3 of them in the microwave at home for 30 seconds, and they're done. but pancakes, on their own, are simply not suitable for breakfast unless I want a hypoglycemic episode an hour later (and I really dislike the nausea that comes along with that), so I top them with peanut butter! works pretty well. :)

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Years ago, I ate the following for breakfast almost every morning and I am now somewhat back to it:

I cook a pound of salmon on the weekends and season well the way I like it. Also, bake some biscuit muffins without sugar. Occasionally, I would cook beets, also, and slice them up and keep in containers in refrigerator. Also, cook about 6 boiled eggs and keep in refrigerator.

Then, I would eat for breakfast salmon, a boiled egg, one or two non-sugared gluten-free biscuits with butter (there are great butter substitute products out now I've heard on other threads) and just fruit jellies, and a few slices of beets or fruit or something raw. I had lots of energy and it was very healthy. I ate some salmon and Bob's Mill cornbread this morning with butter and just fruit, and will have half an apple later on for a snack.

There are other ways to eat protein for breakfast. You just have to experiment and plan ahead and cook on the weekends. The salmon keeps for about a week.

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