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wilkjo1

Celiac And Eggs

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Eggs bother me too. I cannot eat them without feeling nausea and they sit right in my chest. Like a rock.

They are not my favorite food, but I need protein.

If they are baked in something, I do not seem to notice this....it is peculiar.

They did not show up in allergy testing or in food antibody testing. I am thinking, maybe it's just something that is difficult for me to digest at this point?? I don't know..

This celiac thing is a bugger :blink:

lol that's so weird that's exactly what happens to me, cept I haven't really braved the eggs cooked in anything o.o


Gluten Free since Xmas 2010

 

Current Auto Immune Diseases:

 

Celiac Disease, Interstitial Cystitis, IBS, Dermatitis Herpetiformis, I'm playing life on Hard Mode.

 

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Even though my gastro said that I shouldn't put myself through skin prick testing about 8 months after going gluten-free, something was still bugging me. Egg yolks were a 3. Whites were neutral. I'd suspected that eggs were causing a problem, had read that most people who are allergic to eggs are allergic to the whites, so I'd bed eating only egg yoks!

My theory, and I'm not saying I'm right, is that our autoimmune system is whacked. Our cells are attacking proteins that resemble gluten since we've eliminated gluten. Some people develop other food intolerances and some don't. It may (or may not) have something to do with the length of time undiagnosed.

I wonder, too, if I hadn't loaded up on dairy products after going gluten-free (or soy products or corn or egg...) if these other intolerances wouldn't have developed.

If I knew then what I know now, I would encourage a diet where you rotate your protein sources and vegetables. Fruits should be safe, but I even wait a day to repeat fruits.

I'm ok with egg whites, but I don't reapeat them for a few days. And I can make gluten-free pancakes from a mix (with 2 eggs). I'm going to be fine tomorrow, but I'll wait until next week to have the frozen left overs.

I've felt so much better since not eating leftovers the next day for lunch or dinner. You can refrigerate leftovers for 2-3 days, or freeze them. I mix up my protein sources over the course of a week and it really seems to help. I'm trying new foods I never had before, which many books on food allergies have suggested.

As far as having medical advice from doctors about all of this, only the allergist recognized that there is a difference between food allergies and intolerances. The other docs seem to roll their eyes when you tell them you cannot tolerate certain foods. I've learned more from checking out books from the library and reading this forum than I've learned from all of the specialists I've been to.

I think the exact same thing =/ and that makes me wish I had left all those damn sugary products alone >..< lol


Gluten Free since Xmas 2010

 

Current Auto Immune Diseases:

 

Celiac Disease, Interstitial Cystitis, IBS, Dermatitis Herpetiformis, I'm playing life on Hard Mode.

 

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I think that some people can tolerate eggs better in baked goods because there is less egg in each serving compared to eating just eggs. My egg intolerance didn't hit me until after going gluten-free for about 2 years.

I don't know the answer but have been wondering some things about eggs too.

I absolutely cannot handle them. I love them and ate them almost every day, but now that I remember my sickest days with this disease it was defintely the days I was eating bread and eggs every day because I was sick and not working and it was cheap. Now, I cannot handle them at all.

I was reading about egg allergy and it says some people can tolerate them baked and some tolerate the whites. I want to use eggs in baking but am afraid to. Do you avoid all form of eggs even in baking?

My nephew has an egg allergy and the Dr. told my sister he could have them in baked goods. That doesn't really make sense to me but that is what she said.

This is a shocker to me too. I thought gluten was bad enough, but the eggs are almost worse. I bet that is why my recovery was slow in the beginning. I ate eggs and corn tortillas thinking they would be easier on my stomach! Wow...this is certainly a puzzle. I will be interested to see what responses you get. Thank you for posing the egg question.

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I don't know the answer but have been wondering some things about eggs too.

I absolutely cannot handle them. I love them and ate them almost every day, but now that I remember my sickest days with this disease it was defintely the days I was eating bread and eggs every day because I was sick and not working and it was cheap. Now, I cannot handle them at all.

I was reading about egg allergy and it says some people can tolerate them baked and some tolerate the whites. I want to use eggs in baking but am afraid to. Do you avoid all form of eggs even in baking?

My nephew has an egg allergy and the Dr. told my sister he could have them in baked goods. That doesn't really make sense to me but that is what she said.

This is a shocker to me too. I thought gluten was bad enough, but the eggs are almost worse. I bet that is why my recovery was slow in the beginning. I ate eggs and corn tortillas thinking they would be easier on my stomach! Wow...this is certainly a puzzle. I will be interested to see what responses you get. Thank you for posing the egg question.

I allow for eggs in baking but I am careful not too eat too much of it. It appears that they are ok if there are only a few eggs in say 24 muffins. I find this VERY odd...I realize that some proteins can be de-natured during cooking (meaning they lose their shape and your body doesn't recognize them anymore) so maybe baking at high heat for a longer period of time does it vs quickly frying in a pan? I have NO idea. I think it is strange seeing how I can't even have a forkful of fried egg but cooked in bread or baking is A-OK.

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I think it has a lot to do with the combining with other foods. The egg is just a minuscule amount of the muffin, and may sneak through and not make contact with the intestinal wall, but if you eat it on its own, well, there it is, blam in your digestive system. :o It can't ignore it.


Neroli

"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973

Lactose free 1990

(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's

Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004

Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007

Soy free March 2008

Nightshade free Feb 2009

Citric acid free June 2009

Potato starch free July 2009

(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009

Legume free March 2010

Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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Can you tolerate soy?

Ok, this is weird-maybe way out there, but something I've wondered about. I'm absolutely not credentialed to talk about this, but I wanted to throw it out there and see what y'all had to say. I came across a website selling soy-free eggs (Whaaaa? They must be selling something) so looked into it a bit.

Apparently when chickens eat soy, a (very) small amount of soy isoflavones can be found in the eggs (according to this one study). One would think that if this was an issue that people that couldn't eat soy couldn't eat eggs, right? I'm sure plenty of you don't eat soy and do eat eggs, right?

http://etd.ohiolink.edu/view.cgi/Vargas%20Galdos%20Dante%20Miguel%20Marcial.pdf?osu1236706764

So I thought, what the heck are isoflavones and do they have anything to do with allergies or intolerances. Not a scholarly article, but this was a pretty easy to read link about it:

http://www.livestrong.com/article/311412-allergic-reactions-to-soy-isoflavones/

It's a fascinating thing to think about, and kind of bends my brain. Also makes me wonder (after a brief mind-spinning freak out) how if soy is in eggs why not other proteins (*cough*wheat*). But clearly then, we would've noticed that, right (I eat eggs daily!)? (Although I did find a brand of eggs that said they were gluten-free because they don't feed their chickens wheat. SARCASM FONT---->Maybe I'll start marketing gluten-free bananas or something) B)


Diagnosed 2/12/09 by biopsy after years of anemia, neuropathy, dizziness, brain fog, pain and more.

Negative blood tests (following gluten light diet)

Still healing with time, harmony, and good food.

Grain-free 1/11/11

Blogging Gluten-Free

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One study: a thesis by a candidate for a Master of Science. No sign of a peer review or follow up. Maybe there is something here, but I would have thought that if there was it would have been pursued in the two years since this thesis was submitted.

I suppose Mr. Galdos was granted his MSc, but based on his work alone I have trouble drawing a wide-reaching conclusion. There may or may not be an issue for people sensitive to soy, but extrapolating it to other protein sources does not seem to have a foundation.

My opinion--yours may be different.


Peter

Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000. I was retested five years later and the biopsy was normal. You can beat this disease!

Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986

Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator since 2007

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Peter - understood and agreed for the most part. I hope you could tell that my post had a touch of cynicism and a healthy, large grain of salt. Interestingly, the link was provided by some pro-soy people who would WANT to see soy.

That being said, I definitely mean to point out in the mix that there is a LOT we don't know. Any path you choose to explore (allergens, agriculture, autoimmune diseases) have a lot of unknowns. Ask a lot of questions of the right people... and hopefully someone with find some answers. I imagine that there are plenty of poorly researched masters theses out there, but I also imagine some of them led down a groundbreaking path. There are probably also plenty that came up with valid bits of research that were left unexplored.

Scrolling through the posts I noticed a lot of "soy free" people... they might find this interesting. Coincidentally, my nephew is quite allergic to soy and eats eggs all the time without issue.

I have no opinion other than these are certainly interesting concepts that may be jumping off points for someone somewhere. I'm not going to stop eating eggs any time soon... unless I, too, sadly develop an intolerance.


Diagnosed 2/12/09 by biopsy after years of anemia, neuropathy, dizziness, brain fog, pain and more.

Negative blood tests (following gluten light diet)

Still healing with time, harmony, and good food.

Grain-free 1/11/11

Blogging Gluten-Free

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On 10/13/2009 at 9:35 AM, wilkjo1 said:

I was diagnosed with celiac in March. I am not new however to the casein gluten free diet, my boys have been Gluten-free Casein-free and soy free for years. I like having eggs for breakfast, but the last two mornings have developed a horrible stomach ache, irritation in the esophagus, and fatigue. I was wondering if any other celiacs have had problems with eggs? Or if other celiacs have noticed problems with foods they normally have, all of a sudden becoming a problem? One of my classic reactions to gluten is irritation in the esophagus and esophageal spasms and sometimes severe abdominal pain. That is why I am thinking allergy.

My daughter has celiac disease. She was having problems with eggs. They were giving her severe abdominal pains & diarrhea. After researching why, we realized it was because what the chickens were eating. She can only eat “Nellies” eggs. She is very sensitive to anything that may have gluten!  She must use gluten free shampoo and body wash or she gets the rash. It’s awful but things can be worse!!

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6 hours ago, Ehag said:

My daughter has celiac disease. She was having problems with eggs. They were giving her severe abdominal pains & diarrhea. After researching why, we realized it was because what the chickens were eating. She can only eat “Nellies” eggs. She is very sensitive to anything that may have gluten!  She must use gluten free shampoo and body wash or she gets the rash. It’s awful but things can be worse!!

Celiac's, even very sensitive ones, are not affected by what a chicken eats.  Even if the chicken is fed a grain diet, it does not translate to contaminated eggs.  If that were the case then none of us would be able to eat chicken, eggs or red meat, for that matter.  I know there are some who take issue with that but it is true.  We do not have to be concerned with what animals eat.......only in how the meat, chicken or fish is prepared.

If your daughter is breaking out with a rash unless she uses gluten-free shampoo or other topical products, that is an allergic reaction.  She would have to get the shampoo in her mouth for it to cause a Celiac reaction.  While it is a good idea to use gluten-free skin products on Celiac kids, for obvious reasons, it won't cause a Celiac reaction unless it is ingested.

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16 hours ago, Gemini said:

Celiac's, even very sensitive ones, are not affected by what a chicken eats.  Even if the chicken is fed a grain diet, it does not translate to contaminated eggs.  If that were the case then none of us would be able to eat chicken, eggs or red meat, for that matter.  I know there are some who take issue with that but it is true.  We do not have to be concerned with what animals eat.......only in how the meat, chicken or fish is prepared.

If your daughter is breaking out with a rash unless she uses gluten-free shampoo or other topical products, that is an allergic reaction.  She would have to get the shampoo in her mouth for it to cause a Celiac reaction.  While it is a good idea to use gluten-free skin products on Celiac kids, for obvious reasons, it won't cause a Celiac reaction unless it is ingested.

Right, I feed my chickens wheat every day.  But their eggs don't make me sick.

Edited by GFinDC

Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."

Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.

Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, eggplant, celery, strawberries, pistachios, and hard work. Have a good day! 🙂 Paul

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33 minutes ago, Barbara 1 said:

I can’t eat eggs  also they make me sick but before I was celiac I loved them 

I am sorry that you have not gotten eggs back.  It is one of the top 8 food allergens.  Me? I consume two eggs or more a day.    Prior to my celiac disease diagnosis, I had  trouble digesting eggs (lactose too).  Now, I suffer from no ill effects and a repeat endoscopy revealed healed intestinal villi.  

Have you had any follow-up celiac disease testing?  Maybe your celiac disease continues to flare up.  Or maybe your egg intolerance or allergy is permanent.  I still can not consume garlic despite healing from celiac disease.   Besides having trouble digesting it, my Rosacea flares up.  A sure sign that garlic does not like me!  


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test (DGP IgA only) and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Repeat endoscopy/Biopsies: Healed

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Spero Foods makes a Vegan Egg called Scramblit and a Egg salt that taste like hard boiled eggs. Cooks differently but makes a good omelet with the salt, I did it for a week rotating off eggs checking my reactions. They also make some godly vegan cheeses that taste like goat cheese or aged cheeses.
https://www.sperofoods.co/


Diagnosed Issues
Celiac (Gluten Ataxia, and Villi Damage dia. 2014, Villi mostly healed on gluten-free diet 2017 confirmed by scope)
Ulcerative Colitis (Dia, 2017), ADHD, Bipolar, Asperger Syndrome (form of autism)
Allergies Corn, Whey
Sensitivities/Intolerances
Peanuts (resolved 2019), Cellulose Gel, Lactose, Soy, Yeast
Olives (Seems to have resolved or gone mostly away as of Jan, 2017), Sesame (Gone away as of June 2017, still slight Nausea)
Enzyme issues with digesting some foods I have to take Pancreatic Enzymes Since mine does not work right, additional food prep steps also
Low Tolerance for sugars and carbs (Glucose spikes and UC Flares)
Occupation Gluten Free Bakery, Paleo Based Chef/Food Catering

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I found this site because I was digging around on the internet to understand an allergy test that my daughter's doctor gave her. It was a breath test for Celiac because she has hives all the time and we cannot figure out why so we sent her to an Allergist. I have been previously diagnosed with fibromyalgia and my doctor has me on so many vitamins and stuff because I seemed to be low in almost everything - Iron, Vitamin D, and the list is lengthy so I won't list all. I started thinking that I am perhaps having some other issues that might be causing my deficiencies because I take vitamins daily, eat healthy, etc. Just doesn't make sense. My doctor mentioned Celiac at the time but I don't believe he ever tested me. I have noticed over time a few things that I eat that make me really sick like bagels, ok so I stopped bagels but still ate some other things but then my body really showed me that even eating a few pieces of toast caused a reaction.  So I have been pretty much semi gluten-free and only eat corn tortillas, don't eat bread or anything like it, even did a corn bread, gluten free stuffing for Thanksgiving. Anyway, getting to my point, ever since being more conscious about my diet and eating more paleo like I have developed a severe allergy to eggs. I get the same reaction to gluten and eggs, severe stomach cramps where I am doubled over and can barely walk and then severe diarrhea with strattorea in my stool (looks like fat globules). Same exact reaction so now that my daughter is getting checked for allergies I checked online and it looks like Dr's say there is a cross-reactivity between celiac and eggs, dairy and other things because your body is looking at similar protein strands in wheat, eggs, etc. so when our bodies don't have the wheat to react to, we will get the same/similar auto-immune response to things that are "cross-reactive". I am starting to feel similar response to legumes now as well. Ladies/Gents peanuts are a legume! Soon all we will be eating is fruits, veggies, fish and beef due to our bodies rejecting what we Celiac's eat so vehemently.

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