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What Are The Best Prepared Foods And Where Can You Get Them

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I went to Whole foods yesterday and bought everything I could get my hands on that was gluten free. The bread is hard and not good for sandwiches. My daughter just turned 13 and is willing to do the diet but discouraged at the taste and consistency of the bread and other bread products. I want to make this as easy as possible for her. Could someone give me their favorite choices in foods especially bread and noodles. Thank you.

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Welcome to the diet.

I found that my daughter didn't like any of the gluten free breads for about the first 6 months. I think she was comparing it to the texture of wheat bread. After that she slowly started to like it a bit more. At first she would only eat it in french toast, now we have finally gotten to the point where she will actually eat a sandwich. She likes the plain white or the tapioca cheese bread from Kinnickinnick.

I make her muffins from a mix for breakfast instead of toast (a bit cheaper too). We have always had good luck with the Gluten Free Pantry mixes.

As for pasta, we prefer corn to the rice brands. I find the texture is much closer to wheat and it doesn't get as mushy.

I would get your daughter involved in cooking some of her own foods, she may be more invested in giving them a good try instead of after one bite saying she doesn't like it.

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You might want to try making sandwiches out of waffles instead. I've found that my kids prefer this over the gluten-free bread!

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I went to Whole foods yesterday and bought everything I could get my hands on that was gluten free. The bread is hard and not good for sandwiches. My daughter just turned 13 and is willing to do the diet but discouraged at the taste and consistency of the bread and other bread products. I want to make this as easy as possible for her. Could someone give me their favorite choices in foods especially bread and noodles. Thank you.

Hello! I have not tried it yet, but I have read on here in several posts that Udi's bread (which apparently some whole foods carry) is very good. I have found that the Kinnicks (sp?) hamburger buns are actually pretty good. The bread is fairly substantial and does not fall apart in your mouth and I think they taste pretty good. They come frozen and you just thaw them out for 45 seconds in the microwave before you make your sandwich/burger. I have started using them for deli sandwiches, grilled cheese, burgers, etc... I think they come in a pack of 4 or 5 and should be in the freezer section. For noodles, I prefer the corn noodles to the rice noodles, but that's just my personal taste. The corn noodles seem to taste a little more like "real" noodles. They hold up better for leftovers, too. I typically get the DeBoles noodles. Hope that helps some!

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I find most gluten-free frozen bread to be revolting, crumbly and pretty unappealing. I buy the gluten-free Pantry sandwich bread mix in bulk and make that once or twice a week. It keeps for three or four days and it's really good.

I use very hot water when I make it and rise it it in a warm oven for 45 minutes. Then I remove it to preheat the oven for 10 minutes and bake.

I've heard good things about Pamala's bread mix too.

In general, gluten-free bread, just doesn't keep well, even when frozen, so you're better off making your own. The mixes keep it really simple and other than having to be home while it rises, it's pretty low maintenance.

-Margaret

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My kiddo likes Pamela's gluten-free bread mix. Ditto for her pancake mix. He shunned gluten-free breads for a long time but has taken an interest finally and we are finding things he really likes. I have had alot of success this fall with muffins. I've been using Carol Fenster's sorghum blend of flours and just substituting it for the flour and adding xanthan gum according to the amounts listed on the package. He also likes everything I've made from Carol's Gluten-Free Quick and Easy cookbook, which has recipes for homemade mixes you can keep on hand-like a pancake mix. The common denominator in most everything he's tried and liked-whether homemade or store bought is the sorghum flour blend.

Carol's basic sorghum flour blend is:

1 1/2 c. sorghum flour

1 1/2 c. potato or corn starch

1 c. tapioca starch(this is available in the asian section or at an asian market for much less than places like Whole Foods-just cents per bag)

Use breads that are less than appealing as french toast-the batter does magic to add flavor and improve the texture. You can make it in batches and freeze. Works well for PB and J sandwiches or cut up and put in a lunchbox with a small container of jam or maple syrup for dipping-breakfast for lunch! Sometimes the breads work better for grilled cheese sandwiches too, rather than for reg, sandwiches. or for open-faced broiled ham and cheese toast or tuna melts. Pizza toasts might be a good way to use up that Whole Foods loaf too.

We prefer the brown rice pastas-Tinkyada or Trader Joes.

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If you can get your hands on a bread machine, Pamela's Bread is the BEST I've had so far. I've only been gluten free for a little over a week, but I've tried several breads already, many of them ending up in the trash. When I made Pamela's Gluten Free Bread, I was super excited because I'd read so many great reviews about it, and my house smelled so good like homemade bread while it was cooking. And amazingly, when I cut it and ate some, I honestly couldn't tell it didn't have any gluten...it was delicious!! The bread holds together perfectly and wasn't stiff or crumbly like the premade bread at the store.

As far as pasta, I tried Tinkyada and it was good. I put some oil on it after I rinsed it, and definitely regretted it. The pasta soaked up all the oil and got slimy and pretty gross. However, the pasta without oil is very good. I added tomato sauce and some herbs and it was yummy. Good luck!

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Pamela's can be made in the bread machine or in the oven.

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I like the glutino fiber bread best. It's usually kept in the freezer at WF. I don't do pasta often but I do like the Tinkyada for that. Van's waffles are probably good for sandwiches adn also Mission corn tortillas. The corn tortillas are much softer and easier to roll up if you pre-heat them just a little.

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I've tried most of the gluten free breads. They taste like crap. Udi bread actually is the only one so far that I like. Even non-gluten free people like the taste and the texture is more like real Bread. My dh is going gluten free as a test for the next two weeks. He wouldn't have done this except he likes the Udi bread.

Against the Grain make a great baguette. It works good sliced as garlic bread and for French Dip Sandwiches.

Schar products are good (but fragile), try their pasta, crackers and cookies.

Bi-Aglut makes the best pastas that I've found so far. They are made of corn and not rice. The rice ones are ok but not much taste and they fall apart if cooked a few seconds too long.

Quinoa products are good.

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Udi's is good. You can call them ask where you can buy it near you. They were wonderful about that when I called.

We make Gluten Free Pantry bread regularly. It's very good fresh and freezes (slice, wrap slices with piece of plastic wrap between, and put in freezer bag) pretty well. We use frozen slices to thaw and make french toast or put PB&J on while they're frozen in the morning and by lunch they are thawed.

We also use Pamela's pancake mix for pancakes and I make PB&J sandwiches out of them. Sounds strange but is really yummy!

We also use crepes to wrap slices of ham and cheese in. Not exactly a sandwich, but a great lunch or breakfast to go.

Pasta...we use Quinoa and Tinkyada. We love both and serve regularly to non-Celiacs without complaints.

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For sandwich bread I like Glutino's Harvest Corn bread, in a yellow bag. It needs to be toasted first though.

I also like Against the Grain's baguette like someone said.

As for quick n' easy food, I'm all for that. Amy's gluten free macaroni and cheese is pretty good. Microwavable in under 10 minutes. If she goes to school it might be a problem though b/c I don't remember them having microwaves available. I believe Healthy Choice's chicken and rice soup is safe too, but you might want to double check that. I ate that today and was fine. Again, microwaveable thus easy. (I am lazy).

I like Glutino's pizza as well. They are single-serve size and cook in the oven about 10 minutes.

I also like some of Glutino's frozen food meal thingies that are microwaveable (noticing a pattern?). Particularly I like their alfredo penne thing (made from brown rice). They used to make a version with chicken but they stopped where I am. Now it's just the pasta with alfredo. They also have a mac & cheese going on.

That's kind of what I stick to. Corn tortillas might work as a bread subsitute, but I don't like the way those taste a lot of the time.

And as far as brands of pasta that are good...I'll have to get back to you on that. Tinkyada is good, but there are others that I like as well. Bionature? I'll check and come back and edit this post.

Hope this helps some.

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http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/index.ph...mp;#entry569915

Another vote for Udi's bread. The only gluten-free bread I have to keep my non-gluten free family from eating my supply.

As far as pasta, I greatly prefer the Quinoa-Corn pasta made by Quinoa Ancient Harvest over any corn or rice only pasta. I read about some gluten-free pasta from Italy that may be even better, but haven't been able to find it yet.

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You might want to try making sandwiches out of waffles instead. I've found that my kids prefer this over the gluten-free bread!

That sounds great! What recipe do you use? Thanks!

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Just be careful, you don't want to overload your dd's body with other grains and then she could have problems with those, too. Try eating more whole foods.

If she's not into veggies right now, it could be that gluten has made veggies taste bad to her. Within several months of being gluten-free, my starch girl who absolutely hated anything green now loves salads and veggies. Same with nuts.

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I read about some gluten-free pasta from Italy that may be even better, but haven't been able to find it yet.

Try Bi-Aglut pastas from Italy. I love it because it tastes like real pasta and holds it shape.

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My daughter likes the Ener-G Rice Starch and the Flax bread. She prefers it if she can put it in the microwave for 10 seconds before making the sandwich or put it in the toaster. But she can't always do that.

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Udi's is excellent, but too pricey for shipping. I wanted to order 16 loaves but it was $50! I just purchased a Zojirushi bread maker and will try making my own bread. Making your own bread may be the way to go since you will be doing this for at least the next 40+ years.

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Lucky enough to live in Denver, so Udi's is available to me.

Hands down, Udi's Sandwich Bread is the ONLY bread I've tried that I'll eat (including just about every other brand out there). Slices are quite small, but just make two sandwiches. Great grilled ham and cheese! In fact, I've eaten more sandwiches the past month than I have eaten for the past 2 1/2 years, I just threw in the towel.

Pamela's is uniformly good to excellent with all of their products, although using their "universal" mix for bread means you'll be eating sandwiches that taste like pancakes. However, the muffins and pancakes are good and can be easily customized.

Kinnickinnick makes good donuts, hard to find though. Mi-Del cookies taste pretty close to real (make sure you buy gluten-free, packaging looks similar). There's a brand of really good coconut macaroons too (yellow can, forget the name).

Tinkyada is my stand-by choice for pasta, best is brown rice spaghetti, do NOT overcook!

Chex cereals are a godsend.

The new Betty Crocker gluten-free Brownie mix is really good.

McCain Tater Tots will do in a pinch when you're over rice and other potatoes.

Great luck at Outback Steakhouse, but you need to be diligent.

It's not easy, but health will substantially improve as the diet is adhered to. Best advice is to read EVERY label, you'll be surprised. Don't rely on it being labeled with "wheat" or "gluten", still not true.

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Lucky enough to live in Denver, so Udi's is available to me.

Hands down, Udi's Sandwich Bread is the ONLY bread I've tried that I'll eat (including just about every other brand out there). Slices are quite small, but just make two sandwiches. Great grilled ham and cheese! In fact, I've eaten more sandwiches the past month than I have eaten for the past 2 1/2 years, I just threw in the towel.

Pamela's is uniformly good to excellent with all of their products, although using their "universal" mix for bread means you'll be eating sandwiches that taste like pancakes. However, the muffins and pancakes are good and can be easily customized.

Kinnickinnick makes good donuts, hard to find though. Mi-Del cookies taste pretty close to real (make sure you buy gluten-free, packaging looks similar). There's a brand of really good coconut macaroons too (yellow can, forget the name).

Tinkyada is my stand-by choice for pasta, best is brown rice spaghetti, do NOT overcook!

Chex cereals are a godsend.

The new Betty Crocker gluten-free Brownie mix is really good.

McCain Tater Tots will do in a pinch when you're over rice and other potatoes.

Great luck at Outback Steakhouse, but you need to be diligent.

It's not easy, but health will substantially improve as the diet is adhered to. Best advice is to read EVERY label, you'll be surprised. Don't rely on it being labeled with "wheat" or "gluten", still not true.

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