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halfrunner

Healthy Bread In Five Minutes A Day

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Hi all!

I thought I'd throw this out there for another source of homemade bread recipes. It's a book called Healthy Bread in Five Minutes a Day. Technically it just got released today, but it has an entire chapter on gluten free breads. I intend on taking that chapter for a spin when I get it in a few days. (I'm hoping to find a bread DH can live with so he'll stay on a gluten-free diet---the bread is 50% of his complaint.)

The reason I am mentioning this book before I even have it is because I have it's sister book Artisinal bread in five minutes a day and the book is amazing. The basic idea is that you mix up a dough and keep it in the fridge and bake just what you need from it. The breads are fantastic, extremely fast to make, and far superior to store bought. All you need is a pizza stone, a pizza peel, an oven proof pan to put water in as you bake your bread, and a couple of really big plastic bowls with lids. Oh yeah, and there is no kneading involved.

I am very hopeful that the gluten free section will be as well done in the new book.

Laura

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please let us know! I know bread is my biggest complaint also. But my problem is I need to substitute egg replacer and soy milk and those really seem to change outcomes. But please let us know how you like it.

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I've been buried under school, work, and a bout with the swine flu, so I haven't had much chance to take this cookbook for a trial run. But I have a loaf of their master boule in my fridge, which will get baked tonight. I'm really hopeful this will work out well.

I'll also try and get DH to taste the bread tomorrow morning for breakfast so I can report back.

Laura

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Sounds very interesting. I used to make a sweet roll dough(not gluten-free) that proofed or rose in the fridge all night and was baked in the a.m. It was always very tender and wonderful.

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ding! ding! ding! We have a winner!!!!! :D

This bread is everything a good, crusty loaf of bread should be! It's got a great, chewy, slightly crunchy crust (at least fresh out of the oven), a lovely, soft, almost gluteny texture, and is insanely easy.

Even DH said he could easily live on this bread, and he's been really hard to please where bread is concerned.

In a nutshell, 10 out of 10 for ease, taste, and minimal equipment needed. Next up will be the gluten-free cheese bread.

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How many gluten-free recipes are in the chapter? I looked on Amazon and it doesn't give much of a break down.

Thanks for this. It's always good to hear a review!

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How many gluten-free recipes are in the chapter? I looked on Amazon and it doesn't give much of a break down.

Thanks for this. It's always good to hear a review!

I think around 8. I believe there's the "master" bread, a sweet bread for cinnamon roll type applications, a "rye" bread, a cheese bread, and a few others.

If it's not worth buying for that few recipes, check it out from your local library. This title and it's sister title are popular, so most libraries carry it.

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I made the recipe for Olive oil bread for DH. We used it to make pizza dough. The pizza turned out very well, but we found that for a nice, crispy crust, it's best to bake it on a pizza stone. (I used a nonstick pan since I'm out of parchment paper.)

Out of the three recipes I've used so far, he likes them all. This is good, since he was desperately afraid he'd lose all his bread options.

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I actually did something like this just this week, kind of by accident. I had mixed up batter for a loaf of bread, but was just too tired to wait for my bread machine to rise and bake it (it was nearly midnight, and I had to be up at 6:30, and I needed bread for the kids' sandwiches for lunch the next day).

So I used enough dough to make 2 quick rolls on this little gadget-thingie I have (it's called the "GT Express," and it's very cool, BTW), and put the rest of the batter in the fridge for the night, and baked it into a loaf the next day.

It turned out so well, I decided I should always do this--that way, we'd always have fresh rolls whenever we need them (it only takes 7 minutes to bake them on the GT), instead of baking the whole loaf at once and ending up with 3-day old, crumbly bread.

How do they suggest that you store the dough? When I opened the lid after the night in the fridge, it popped off with such force, I thought I was going to have bread dough on the ceiling!! I can't imagine what 3 days in the fridge would do....

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Halfrunner, can you tell me if they use soy flour or potato starch in their recipes? Thanks.

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Half Runner: Are these yeast-breads? Thanks!

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Thanks for the link, Deb. That looks great. I just need a big round lidded container :P Love the look of that crust :)

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Gluten-Free Crusty Boule

Makes enough dough for at least four 1-pound loaves

2 cups Brown Rice Flour

1 1/2 cups Sorghum Flour

3 cups Tapioca Flour (also called tapioca starch)

2 tablespoons yeast (can be reduced but you will have to increase the rise time)

1 tablespoon kosher salt (increase or decrease to taste)

2 tablespoons Xanthan Gum

2 2/3 cups lukewarm water

4 large eggs, whisked together

1/3 cup neutral-flavored oil or olive oil

2 tablespoons honey or sugar

Mixing and storing the dough: Whisk together the flours, yeast, salt and xanthan gum in a 5-quart lidded Round Food Storage Container. Combine the oil and water, set aside.

Dump the eggs into the dry ingredients and then stir while you pour in about 1/3 of the oil and water. Unlike our wheat doughs we do not add all of the liquid at once and stir. If you do that it will result in a lumpy dough.

continue to stir while you pour in another 1/3 of the liquid.

The dough will start to come together in a thick dough. Add the final 1/3 of liquid and

stir until the dough is nice and smooth. Cover with the lid, but do not snap it shut. Allow it to rest on the counter for about 2 hours. Place the dough in the refrigerator and store for up to 7 days. (I have a piece in the freezer and I will report back about how that turns out once I defrost it and bake it up. Stay tuned.)

On baking day take the bucket from the refrigerator. The dough will be quite fluffy still and you want to try not to handle the dough too much. Just like our other doughs the trick is to keep as much of the air bubbles in tact as possible.

Use wet hands to remove 1-pound (grapefruit-size) piece of dough from the bucket.

The dough will be quite scraggly when you take it out, just place it on a piece of parchment paper.

Use wet hands to smooth out the surface of the dough.

This may take dipping your hands in the water a few times

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I don't have sorghum flour at my house, so I'd have to look at my modifications, but I think I used potato starch, and a mix of rice flours and maybe some soy flour.

If anybody wants the Olive oil dough recipe, PM me and I'll type it out for you. I don't want to post it directly since it's not on their site.

Laura

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I should have also mentioned that I broke the recipe down into a single boule measurement so that I don't have dough go bad (the eggs can turn the bread if you don't use it fast enough). I just mix a new loaf as soon as I pull the dough out of my bowl (which also means I use a smaller bowl that leaves room in my fridge for other stuff).

My bowls were cheap plastic ones from target that came in a set of four.

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I've made the regular boules many times for my wheat-loving friends and neighbors. It's very easy and delicious... or so they tell me. I'm SOOOOO PSYCHED that I can try it gluten-free!!!

Been wanting to do a muffaleta ever since I saw the Neely's do it on Food TV!! Not to mention making tiny boules and taking out the middles and toasting them for soup bowls!!

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Have you seen the recipe in Carol Fenster's 1,000 Gluten Free Recipes, page 99,

Breakthrough Ready-to-Bake Yeast Bread?

..."you mix the bread dough and refrigerate it, ...for up to 5 days"

flaxmeal is used instead of egg, and soymilk is listed as an option for the warm milk.

I haven't tried it, but I may since I do have the flours listed in my pantry.

Deb

Question to anyone:) re Healthy Bread in Five Minutes a Day.

Without going to the store I don't have quite enough flours for the gluten-free Crusty Boule, and I do have the flours for the gluten-free Olive Oil Bread--but no soy. My question, what is a successful substitute for soy flour?

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I made the gluten-free boule yesterday!! It's not exactly like the original wheat flour recipe, but then what gluten-free result is the same? It was delicious! Absolutely the best homemade bread recipe I've tried yet... I use Pamela's bread mix for sandwich bread. It didn't shrink back on itself after baking and everyone liked it! (even non-celiacs). It was light and WONDERFUL!

I did like I do when I make the wheat bread for fam and friends... I mixed it up in my Kitchen Aid mixer and just put plastic wrap tightly over the bowl for rising out of the fridge and then the whole bowl right into the fridge. I don't think I've been this excited since I discovered Tinkyada pastas!

The funny part for me was that I didn't have a heavy dutch oven (I imagined they were talking about a Le Crueset casserole/dutch oven), but I did have a big, really heavy cast iron thing w/ a lid. I think it weighs about 10 lbs! I put that into the 500

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Have you seen the recipe in Carol Fenster's 1,000 Gluten Free Recipes, page 99,

Breakthrough Ready-to-Bake Yeast Bread?

Question to anyone:) re Healthy Bread in Five Minutes a Day.

Without going to the store I don't have quite enough flours for the gluten-free Crusty Boule, and I do have the flours for the gluten-free Olive Oil Bread--but no soy. My question, what is a successful substitute for soy flour?

I use sorghum to replace soy.

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I use sorghum to replace soy.

Thanks for that info!

I ended up making 1/2 recipe of the Crusty Boule, using olive oil and for 1 1/2c. tapioca starch flour used 1 cup tapioca flour and 1/2 cup potato starch. The Olive Oil Bread calls for the soy flour,and sorghum would have worked well as a substitute.

I liked the Crusty Boule dough for pizza the best. Super easy!It has a nice chewy texture and almost a sourdough taste.

Today I am going to make 1/2 recipe of the Brioche Bread. Page 252 of the book indicates it is also good for sandwich bread and cinnamon buns.

The recipe is posted at http://www.wasabimon.com/archive/gluten-free-brioche-recipe/

or google, wasabimon, and look at December 31, 2009 post.

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Has anybody experimented with substituting some of the brown rice and sorghum flours? I was wondering about using some teff, amaranth and/or millet in the recipe.

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