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Back To Basics gluten-free Diet

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Like at least some here, I have tried both the Paleo and the Specific Carbohydrate Diet. Neither really fits me although both have helped given their avoidance of the standard American diet--even the gluten-free variety. What I propose is a diet based on both simplicity and moderation. Eat whole foods. Don't emphasize too much of anything. Avoid sugars and overall avoid a diet emphasizing a preponderance of grains or other starch (in particular avoid eating a diet which emphasizes ground up grains). Consider eating more roots and squash. Eat lots of greens. Eat some fruit (if you can handle it--I can't unfortunately). Balance this with digestible proteins (meat or fish, yogurt, seeds, beans or nuts or eggs if you can digest them) also in moderation. Use digestible oils and fats added to one's food as needed--like olive and coconut oil and real butter. Drink plenty of water between meals. Use herbs and digestive enzymes, minerals and vitamins as needed. Use some sea salt with meals. This may seem too obvious and simple--however I think it would be helpful and healing for many. It is at any rate what I intend to explore. If anyone here wishes to explore with me, let's do so!

Bea

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I'm willing to explore! I have no idea what a paleo or carb diet it, and I'm not in to diets, I'm just in to eating what I like, I dont like anyone telling me what to do and what to eat! But I like whole foods and have always tried to feed my family with whole foods. However, I myself have failed miserably in the fruits and veggies department. I would like to do better! I also need some real work on drinking water. I have never liked water at all, and I'm ashamed to say that I haven't had ANY today. I normally have only one glass of water a day, and drink one or two glasses of iced tea, and that would be it. Anyway, I'm willing to give this a go with ya.

Like at least some here, I have tried both the Paleo and the Specific Carbohydrate Diet. Neither really fits me although both have helped given their avoidance of the standard American diet--even the gluten-free variety. What I propose is a diet based on both simplicity and moderation. Eat whole foods. Don't emphasize too much of anything. Avoid sugars and overall avoid a diet emphasizing a preponderance of grains or other starch (in particular avoid eating a diet which emphasizes ground up grains). Consider eating more roots and squash. Eat lots of greens. Eat some fruit (if you can handle it--I can't unfortunately). Balance this with digestible proteins (meat or fish, yogurt, seeds, beans or nuts or eggs if you can digest them) also in moderation. Use digestible oils and fats added to one's food as needed--like olive and coconut oil and real butter. Drink plenty of water between meals. Use herbs and digestive enzymes, minerals and vitamins as needed. Use some sea salt with meals. This may seem too obvious and simple--however I think it would be helpful and healing for many. It is at any rate what I intend to explore. If anyone here wishes to explore with me, let's do so!

Bea

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I'm willing to explore! I have no idea what a paleo or carb diet it, and I'm not in to diets, I'm just in to eating what I like, I dont like anyone telling me what to do and what to eat! But I like whole foods and have always tried to feed my family with whole foods. However, I myself have failed miserably in the fruits and veggies department. I would like to do better! I also need some real work on drinking water. I have never liked water at all, and I'm ashamed to say that I haven't had ANY today. I normally have only one glass of water a day, and drink one or two glasses of iced tea, and that would be it. Anyway, I'm willing to give this a go with ya.

Hi McPhena--nice to have you wander this terrain with me! Let's try to make a go of it. Please let me know what kinds of things you want to explore.

I needed to go off grains to heal long term celiac--and both the Paleo Diet and the Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) diets do that. Going off the grains for 10 months really helped me--but now it seems like I can have whole grains again--as well as even aged organic cheddar cheese and now even some eggs finally --maybe not every day, but often enough (yay!!).

I would thus kind of like to start experimenting with recipes and remedies. SCD is not really for me since I continue to be allergic to nuts and can't handle eating honey or any sweets--so I use stevia as a natural sweetner instead. These days I also use olive leaf tea or extract, garlic and oregano oil in order to counteract candida etc. overgrowth--and I use marshmallow root powder to help heal and soothe my intestines and kidneys when needed--and dandelion and yellow dock roots as a way to detox periodically.

I make SCD 24 hour home made yogurt that ferments out all the lactose--which is important for the likes of me--plus it has a lot more acidophilus than regular store bought 7 hour yogurt. Its a Similar concept for using the aged, live cheddar vs stuff that is more commercially mass produced. Soon I want to try making fermented cabbage too...

I have started using celtic sea salt rather than regular sea salt since it has so much more minerals. AliB on the SCD suggested it and it seems a winner. Am also going to try out her suggestion of making salt sole using salt crystals. More on all this later.

Meanwhile, I have also just been learning that while drinking plenty of water (8 cups or more spread through the day) is really important for everyone, it turns out it is even more important for us due to the damage to our villi in the intestines--so I want to encourage you to make an effort in that direction. Using water bottles helps since then you know how much water you have drunk and don't really have to think about it much.

I personally like to eat big salads with a little cold cut chicken cut in or some sliced hard boiled egg eaten with either some squash or brown rice. Am going to go prepare some of that for myself right now. I plan to have the yogurt with some carob and stevia for desert.

Talk with you later!

Bea

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McPhena, this may seem to be an odd suggestion, but experiment with the temperature of the water you are drinking. When I was trying to increase my water intake, I was keeping a pitcher of water in the fridge. I thought that would be more "refreshing" but I was having a hard time drinking it. When I kept the water on the counter (room temp), I did much better. A friend of a friend liked her water "warm" like she was drinking hot tea . . . but tea-less :P

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McPhena, this may seem to be an odd suggestion, but experiment with the temperature of the water you are drinking. When I was trying to increase my water intake, I was keeping a pitcher of water in the fridge. I thought that would be more "refreshing" but I was having a hard time drinking it. When I kept the water on the counter (room temp), I did much better. A friend of a friend liked her water "warm" like she was drinking hot tea . . . but tea-less :P

Janet--good suggestion! I actually almost never drink ice cold water except for the summer time...

Bea

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Like at least some here, I have tried both the Paleo and the Specific Carbohydrate Diet. Neither really fits me although both have helped given their avoidance of the standard American diet--even the gluten-free variety. What I propose is a diet based on both simplicity and moderation. Eat whole foods. Don't emphasize too much of anything. Avoid sugars and overall avoid a diet emphasizing a preponderance of grains or other starch (in particular avoid eating a diet which emphasizes ground up grains). Consider eating more roots and squash. Eat lots of greens. Eat some fruit (if you can handle it--I can't unfortunately). Balance this with digestible proteins (meat or fish, yogurt, seeds, beans or nuts or eggs if you can digest them) also in moderation. Use digestible oils and fats added to one's food as needed--like olive and coconut oil and real butter. Drink plenty of water between meals. Use herbs and digestive enzymes, minerals and vitamins as needed. Use some sea salt with meals. This may seem too obvious and simple--however I think it would be helpful and healing for many. It is at any rate what I intend to explore. If anyone here wishes to explore with me, let's do so!

Bea

I'm in! This is almost exactly how I have come to realize is the best way for me to eat/live. Cutting grains and sugar have been huge in terms of normalizing my blood pressure, weight, fluid accumulation, energy level, and digestion. I can't do legumes and can only handle eggs in moderation but am focusing on protein, nuts, veggies, fruit, tea, and lots of spring water.....sea and Himalayan salt....olive oil....some butter...some cheese--even wine. I try to practice moderation, not my strong suit....but I do try and vary my diet as much as possible since when I was still struggling, I would discover something that didn't make me sick and eat tons of that.

I have to realize I don't need to do that anymore :P Squashes are incredibly versatile--the spaghetti type has become a staple.

This feeling of well-being has sort of naturally led me to getting more exercise--walking and Pilates. I've found supplements I can tolerate. It's been a process--I still cope with anxiety and remain super sensitive to gluten--but I think realizing that I had to think outside the box, in that the gluten-free diet was just not going to cut it all the way for me was key. I read a ton and took ideas and principals from Paleo, SCD, and considered lots of other's experiences and read everything I could about how we actually use the foods we eat. Most importantly, I listened to my own body :D

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ewwww, lukewarm water!!! I like mine cold and with ICE if possible, but then I have a terrible ice chewing addiction I am trying to break. I will try to drink more water today.

I have about 8 huge spaghetti squash on the floor of my pantry that I grew in my garden this year (okay, I should say my HUSBAND grew for me in our garden this year). I have NO idea what to do with these. I wish I could share them with you all. Any suggestions?? I'm willing to cook one up today!

Yesterday I did something good! I replaced my usual creamy salad dressing (ie ranch or blue cheese) with olive oil and balsamic vinegar, fresh ground salt and pepper. It was DELICIOUS. I could not stop eating my salad. I put purple cabbage, and sunflower seeds on it. Today I'm going to have that again but with my costco rotisserie chicken on top.

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I have about 8 huge spaghetti squash on the floor of my pantry that I grew in my garden this year (okay, I should say my HUSBAND grew for me in our garden this year). I have NO idea what to do with these. I wish I could share them with you all. Any suggestions?? I'm willing to cook one up today!

I wash the squash and then poke holes all over it with a fork. Then, I bake it on a sheet pan for about an hour at 375 degrees. I generally do this when using the oven for something else like baked pork chops, chicken, etc.

To serve, carefully cut the squash in half lengthwise, scoop out and discard the center seeds. Take 2 forks and "fluff" up the strands and use as spaghetti, or as a side dish. It's also good sauteed in olive oil and garlic.

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I wash the squash and then poke holes all over it with a fork. Then, I bake it on a sheet pan for about an hour at 375 degrees. I generally do this when using the oven for something else like baked pork chops, chicken, etc.

To serve, carefully cut the squash in half lengthwise, scoop out and discard the center seeds. Take 2 forks and "fluff" up the strands and use as spaghetti, or as a side dish. It's also good sauteed in olive oil and garlic.

I do the same as Patti, but use the Micro. And toss strands with butter, sal and pepper and parmesan cheese. Fresh veggie are good anyway you make them. Simple is good.

Nice thread Bea! :)

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Spaghetti squash is a staple of my diet. I'll bet your homegrown is good! Out of all the spaghetti squashes I've purchased this summer and fall, only one has been really tasty, the rest rather bland and flavorless. I toss mine with homemade pesto or sprinkle with the warm spices-cinnamon, allspice etc. I freeze unseasoned portions of it to be warmed up at my convenience.

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Thanks for the info on spaghetti squash. I need to try it again, mine was bland but I can make it like suggested. Does it keep for a couple of days once cooked? Even squash seems hard to digest for me so I can only have a small amount.

I agree on water at room temp. If it's very hot outside I like it cold but otherwise room temp. Just a note: chewing ice is a symptom of low iron! Might want to add a supplement.

I'm pretty bored with my stricter diet right now so I'm glad for some new twists on the same 'ol. I'm still eating too much sugar, I know. That is a bad habit but I have cut back. I'd like to try the fermented cabbage. Can you post the recipe again, Bea?

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Its so great to see more of you on here--Janet, jersey angel and Lisa! Its nice to know I am not alone in following this back to basics "middle path"!

Am glad to hear about how to bake spaghetti squash. I previously tried to boil mine--and it just wasn't very tasty--and so gave up on it. I don't eat tomatoes very often and thus haven't thought about using it much.

However I could see mixing other vegetables with it like celery and broccoli or bok choy say with some olives, mushrooms, green onions and garlic and then add in some cut up pieces of chicken, fresh basil and olive oil as a kind of alternate to some of those Italian pasta dishes out there. Definitely worth a try! May do so in the next few days.

I plan to cook up some baked butternut squash tonight and just have a simple Fall meal with it, with broccoli and baked chicken.

Meanwhile, have any of you explored the virtues of ending the day with 2 or 3tsp. raw powdered carob mixed in a large mug with hot water, stevia and topped off with coconut milk? I got into it more when I had D after a bad antibiotic reaction--but it is good any time. Just make sure you take some magnesium at night too however if you have a tendency to get blocked up.

Bea

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Thanks for the info on spaghetti squash. I need to try it again, mine was bland but I can make it like suggested. Does it keep for a couple of days once cooked? Even squash seems hard to digest for me so I can only have a small amount.

I agree on water at room temp. If it's very hot outside I like it cold but otherwise room temp. Just a note: chewing ice is a symptom of low iron! Might want to add a supplement.

I'm pretty bored with my stricter diet right now so I'm glad for some new twists on the same 'ol. I'm still eating too much sugar, I know. That is a bad habit but I have cut back. I'd like to try the fermented cabbage. Can you post the recipe again, Bea?

Hi Angle--here's what I've got from my files for the fermented cabbage juice. I need to try it too. Never got around to it. But now I do have the cabbage and a large jar...so just may do so later on today or in the next few. Looks like I may have to get some bottled water first. I have a filter, but am not sure if it gets out enough of the chlorination...

And do consider using stevia as a sugar substitute. It really is quite good as long as you don't use too much (then it gets bitter). Again, moderation...

Bea

The rest is quoted from Ali's SCD thread:

"By the way everyone, the cabbage juice is easier to make than the yogurt. No temps to monitor. Just wash the cabbage, tear up into the blender add the water and blend, add a little of your previous batch of juice, and let it sit. 24 hours later, strain it, throw away the cabbage and make your new batch.

3 C cabbage, 1 3/4 C water. The first time let it sit 3 days, no probiotic needed, but you can add some acidophilus if you want. After that, make it fresh everyday and add 1/4 C of the previous juice. 24 hrs from the 2nd batch onward.

Aquaman Lifeforce, Mark's Homemade Sauerkraut (revised by SRB)

To make two sun jars of Mark's Homemade Sauerkraut

Start with:

1-2 cabbages (purple or green).

Non-chlorinated water (1 to 3 cups).

2 one quart mason jars (wide mouthed is easiest).

Starter (2 cups of yogurt, or two packages of yogurt starter, or one jar of live sauerkraut).

Chop, then shred the vegetables in a food processor using a 3X3 mm shredding blade.

Mix in a large bowl and place into the jars.

Mix the starter with the non-chlorinated water as follows:

For yogurt , mix 2 cups yogurt with 3 cups water, mix well.

For yogurt starter, mix powder with 3 cups water, mix well until dissolved.

For sauerkraut starter, mix

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Thanks for the info on spaghetti squash. I need to try it again, mine was bland but I can make it like suggested. Does it keep for a couple of days once cooked? Even squash seems hard to digest for me so I can only have a small amount.

Yeah, the spaghetti squash is bland all by itself, but I think that's what makes it so versatile and an excellent carb substitute. You can simply add salt and butter/olive oil to it or get really inventive since it goes with pretty much anything.

It does keep for a couple days in a covered container in the fridge--my husband and I usually get 2 meals (as a side dish) from a good sized one.

Meanwhile, have any of you explored the virtues of ending the day with 2 or 3tsp. raw powdered carob mixed in a large mug with hot water, stevia and topped off with coconut milk?

I have not, but that sounds really good. I can't do coconut, unfortunately, since I'm intolerant to it. I bought some Stevia in the Raw recently but have been afraid to try it :lol: I can do dairy, I'm going to try this with nonfat organic milk.

How much stevia should I use for a mug?

Bea, I love your fall dinner--I make chicken, broccoli and squash quite frequently. We've also gotten into brussels sprouts--it's amazing how good the fresh ones are compared to the frozen.

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Yeah, the spaghetti squash is bland all by itself, but I think that's what makes it so versatile and an excellent carb substitute. You can simply add salt and butter/olive oil to it or get really inventive since it goes with pretty much anything.

It does keep for a couple days in a covered container in the fridge--my husband and I usually get 2 meals (as a side dish) from a good sized one.

I have not, but that sounds really good. I can't do coconut, unfortunately, since I'm intolerant to it. I bought some Stevia in the Raw recently but have been afraid to try it :lol: I can do dairy, I'm going to try this with nonfat organic milk.

How much stevia should I use for a mug?

Bea, I love your fall dinner--I make chicken, broccoli and squash quite frequently. We've also gotten into brussels sprouts--it's amazing how good the fresh ones are compared to the frozen.

Hi Patti,

I guess the difference in taste between squashes is what made me not go with the spaghetti squash. I plan to rectify that soon however!

Brussel sprouts are very good and worth the extra trouble of having to steam them longer than most veggies. I like them with butter and a little fresh lemon juice. Vinegar would work too--esp. apple cider vinegar like Bragg's--just am sensitive to it these days due to fungal/yeast sensitivity or who knows what.

The amount of stevia you use depends on your taste, what you are putting it into and how big the mug is. I just usually sprinkle some in. However they do have those tiny plastic scoops, one or two would do. What is the measure? I just looked and its really small. 1/32-1/16 of a tsp. Somewhere in there...

I don't do carob every day since my body is very reactive to so many things--I don't want to get allergic to it too. So I usually alternate every other day if not longer. Sometimes I alternatively make a cinnamon tea. Same basic principle. Nutmeg too--though use only a little nutmeg. A little goes a long ways... Any milk to top it off is fine--or just have it plain. I can't have coconut milk every day but find its fine two or three times a week... Unfortunately I am allergic to the beta carotene they add to most milk substitutes--and plain milk does not work for me.

Bea

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Sometimes I alternatively make a cinnamon tea. Same basic principle. Nutmeg too--though use only a little nutmeg.

Yum! I like to have something warm at night--I'll have to try these ideas. I do have 2 cups of tea a day but the caffeine is enough to interfere with sleep if I have it after dinner.

Do try the spaghetti squash baked--it's almost sweet and not too "wet".

Thanks for the Stevia information--sounds like I won't need to use much at all. I have heard that it can get bitter or licorice-y tasting if you use too much.

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Hi again! I was gone a lot today and am just catching up. I like the idea of pesto on the spaghetti squash since I am trying to not have many tomatoes right now. I think I'll bake one tomorrow and see how it goes.

Yes, my iron is low and maybe that is why I chew through a cotsco sized bag of ice a week. I need to stop though, and I am taking supplements now so hopefully that will help.

Speaking of coconut milk, I tried some this morning in my fruit smoothie and I did NOT like the greasy feeling it left on my tongue so I am not doing that again. I'm going to use the rest to make coconut rice to go with thai style chicken or something I guess.

I do not like Stevia. I have tried to! It just creeps me out the way it is not sweet until you swallow and the air hits your mouth and THEN all the sudden you can taste the sweet. Until the air hits your mouth, no sweet at all. I cannot get used to that.

I, too, enjoy a warm drink at night!! I am currently trying warm rice milk with cocoa in it.

OH! speaking of brussels sprouts, try this! Cut them in half, fresh ones, toss with olive oil, freshly cracked salt and pepper, and some lemon juice. Then roast them on a baking sheet in the oven about 20 minutes. They are SO good this way!!

Ang, I am with you on the sugar, I am trying to break a lifelong sweet tooth! I grew up on capn crunch and lucky charms!! It's a hard habit to break (not the cereal but the sugar).

would fermented cabbage be the same thing as korean kim'chi? I used to really like that with rice. Maybe I could eat that again. It's spicy and some brands are good and some are GROSS.

I had a big salad for dinner with mixed baby greens, purple cabbage, sunflower seeds, sliced cold chicken, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper. it was delicious!

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mcphena, how are you feeling? Is going back to whole foods calming down your symptoms? I hope you are doing well. I use stevia and hadn't noticed it taste the way your describe. Granted it's different from sugar but I used artificial sweeteners for years so it's fine for me. I use the pure extract as I was glutened by the packets.

Thanks, Bea for that extensive message about cabbage. I'll have to decide what I want to do. I didn't expect choices!

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Hope you all don't mind if I chime in from time to time. I hesitate to "join" anything because it feels like one more thing to do, even if I enjoy it.

Anyway, I am intersted in some of these things-like coconut products. If I find enough concrete ways to use it that'll work for me, Ill buy some. I'm at the look and learn stage. I do keep coconut milk and use it for kiddo but those recipes don't work within my restrictions.

I will try baking the uncut spaghetti squash next time. I usually cut it in half and lay it face down on a roasting pan with a bit of oil and water in the bottom. It ends up a bit watery. I should just skip the water maybe.

I will try roasting the brussel sprouts too. That sound very good! I'm all for simple, flavorful dishes using low-carb seasonal veggies!

I saw elsewhere that one should drink 1 oz. water per 2 lbs. of body weight so calculated and measured mine out into a pitcher last night and set it on the counter for today. Will drink from that as usual without trying to drink it all, to get an idea of how much I usually drink. I drink mostly water for my beverages but am one who has to remind myself to drink sometimes as I can often go a long time without.

Look forward to sharing!

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I can't do coconut, unfortunately, since I'm intolerant to it. I bought some Stevia in the Raw recently but have been afraid to try it :lol: I can do dairy, I'm going to try this with nonfat organic milk.
Hi Patti. I wonder if you are intolerant to the coconut because the bugs react to the medium-chain fatty acids in it - the caprylic, capric, lauric and myristic acids? Coconut is quite a powerful anti-fungal, bacterial and viral and could easily stir up a hornets' nest down there initially.

I have found that sometimes with different things I have taken - the first few times I took the oregano oil I was reacting but gradually it has tailed off and I am ok with it now. The reaction actually made me feel that the oil was doing some good!

Whilst some reactions - like the one to gluten can be detrimental, I am sure that others are the result of a good process - makes you realise it is doing something! The problem comes from trying to decipher which is which! :lol:

This is quite a good idea Bea, it hits the middle ground between the SCD and the 'norm' without being too pedantic - but then personally I was never pedantic about the SCD - I used to quietly side-step that debate. But then how could I be too pedantic when I was still nibbling on the odd square of bitter choc, or occasional rice cake, etc.?

What all these things do, whether SCD or otherwise, is put the focus back on to REAL food. We are all different - although our bodies work pretty much the same, we are all at different stages of our health issues - our bacterial overgrowth, or dehydration, or whatever our individual problems are so may need to tweak things to our personal needs.

We all seem to agree though that high, and particularly processed foods, and sugars need to be removed from the equation. Some can cope with a bit of starch, others not. Some can cope with a bit of fruit, some not. But as long as we stick to REAL fresh food we can't go too far wrong.

I do wish though that I had realised the benefit of drinking water. I might well have saved myself the issues I had with die-off if I had been drinking water a lot earlier in the process - it helps the body get the toxins out, so would have been a great help. Still, better late than never.

PS. One little thing about the coconut milk. Some of them are hydrogenated. If you are not sure you can contact the manufacturer. Over here in the UK where it is colder, if the milk is already all blended and creamy when the tin is opened then it is likely to be hydrogenated (Pride brand is one I have checked if you get that in the States - the consistency made me suspicious), if it is separated then it is not hydrogenated (I use the Natco brand which is just pure coconut milk - no additives or anything, but that may only be available over here). You could always try putting the tin in the fridge to cool and see what happens if you are not sure. When the unhydrogenated stuff is in a warm climate it will normally blend with a shake of the tin.

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Hi Ali, Nice to see you here! Am glad you like the thread and approve of this basic foods middle path; it is a nice compliment to have you participate herein. I am also very glad that the extra water you are drinking is working so well for you.

I agree with you about the coconut; its possible the trouble some people have with it could be die off. Though on the other hand if I have coconut milk etc. several days in a row I start getting allergic to it (throat clamps up etc--which I know is an allergic reaction).

Am actually dealing with another allergic reaction today--had egg two days in a row and a bit of cheese. I forgot--its a real no no from way back to combine those two for me. I was so glad to be able to eat them again that I forgot my old reaction to their combination as well as hoped the frequency could be upped. But no, the gods did not smile on me for that bit of imagining. Today I have a headache as a result. Am taking the baking soda in water trick which helps but is not doing the whole thing. Will likely wear off as the day goes on. I used to get migraines all the time and hope this isn't the beginning of one...

So that is a topic I'd like to bring up--allergies and food sensitivities and leaky gut. I find that by rotating certain foods every few days or so (or even have the otherwise offending item just once a week or once a month) or, alternatively, not combining certain foods, I can widen what I can safely eat. Anyone else here have that experience?

I have had long term celiac so have developed multiple food sensitivities due in great part I believe to leaky gut --in counterpoint I have very few pollen allergies (just one I am not sure of what it is--fortunately it only last a couple of days a year).

The leaky gut is also one reason that I like certain mucilaginous herbs to heal the intestines (like marshmallow root and slippery elm). Elaine Gottschall really was against them since they did not work for her child and apparently are composed of disaccharides, which is very anti SCD. However for me the mucilaginous herbs really do work. If I hadn't had the use of them I really might not be here on the planet given my sensitive kidneys as well as intestines. In fact recently I have had to use quite a bit of the marshmallow root due to the whole fiasco with the antibiotics I took in early October for an ear infection. The antibiotics caused me to have mucous colitis with copious D plus really irritated my old injured kidney until I started taking the marshmallow root as well as massive doses of enterically coated acidophilus.

Recently I also have re-started taking freshly ground up flax seed (ground up in my little dedicated coffee grinder) with a little apple pectin (1/4 tsp) and then mixed in a glass of water and chased with another glass of water. Both of these gently bulking items are mucilaginous too. I have needed them to help normalize my intestines. Totally non SCD but totally appropriate for me and I kind of figure appropriate for a bunch of other folks too. I think that for many who have celiac they need something to help make their intestines less leaky after all--the opposite of what Elaine was trying to do for those with colitis who are allergic to disaccharides.

I know this is a big topic and maybe I should have split it up--but wanted to get it out anyway. Let me know if this style sometimes works for any of you or not. If not, don't be afraid to say so and I will dial back...

Meanwhile am munching on my salad...Have decided that I am not going to eat either egg or cheese for another week and will definitely eat them on separate days from now on.

Bea

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mcphena, how are you feeling? Is going back to whole foods calming down your symptoms? I hope you are doing well. I use stevia and hadn't noticed it taste the way your describe. Granted it's different from sugar but I used artificial sweeteners for years so it's fine for me. I use the pure extract as I was glutened by the packets.

Thanks, Bea for that extensive message about cabbage. I'll have to decide what I want to do. I didn't expect choices!

Hi Angle, I agree with you--the stevia takes getting used to but once done its great. I actually went off all sweetners for a while, so maybe that made it easier. I also noticed its best not to use stevia with something that is bitter--like coffee for instance (though I don't drink coffee since its too much of a stimulant for me).

I didn't know if you could use all that info on the cabbage. It is a a little daunting. Just try the first part is my best suggestion. It was what I had in my files from Ali's SCD discussion, so I just plopped it in...

Bea

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Am finally starting to feel better. Seems taking detox herbs earlier and then drinking 2 glasses of fresh lemon juice in water with stevia this evening is helping to resolve my headache. I have definitely learned my lesson--absolutely not to eat an egg two days in a row and especially not to do so with cheese that same day...

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So that is a topic I'd like to bring up--allergies and food sensitivities and leaky gut. I find that by rotating certain foods every few days or so (or even have the otherwise offending item just once a week or once a month) or, alternatively, not combining certain foods, I can widen what I can safely eat. Anyone else here have that experience?

I have had long term celiac so have developed multiple food sensitivities due in great part I believe to leaky gut --in counterpoint I have very few pollen allergies (just one I am not sure of what it is--fortunately it only last a couple of days a year).

The leaky gut is also one reason that I like certain mucilaginous herbs to heal the intestines (like marshmallow root and slippery elm). Elaine Gottschall really was against them since they did not work for her child and apparently are composed of disaccharides, which is very anti SCD. However for me the mucilaginous herbs really do work. If I hadn't had the use of them I really might not be here on the planet given my sensitive kidneys as well as intestines. In fact recently I have had to use quite a bit of the marshmallow root due to the whole fiasco with the antibiotics I took in early October for an ear infection. The antibiotics caused me to have mucous colitis with copious D plus really irritated my old injured kidney until I started taking the marshmallow root as well as massive doses of enterically coated acidophilus.

Recently I also have re-started taking freshly ground up flax seed (ground up in my little dedicated coffee grinder) with a little apple pectin (1/4 tsp) and then mixed in a glass of water and chased with another glass of water. Both of these gently bulking items are mucilaginous too. I have needed them to help normalize my intestines. Totally non SCD but totally appropriate for me and I kind of figure appropriate for a bunch of other folks too. I think that for many who have celiac they need something to help make their intestines less leaky after all--the opposite of what Elaine was trying to do for those with colitis who are allergic to disaccharides.

Hi Bea,

Now, I'm jumping in here as well. Think your approach of 'back to basics' makes a lot of sense. The SCD worked for me - and I don't think I could have improved as much as I have, without being totally committed to it. But hat's simply because my problems must have fitted into the SCD scale (still do as I'm still on it and probably will have to be for years to come), whereas everyone is different, and I think for many a more combined basic diet will be right.

In any case, your comments on leaky gut, allergies and food sensitivities totally hit home for me. Leaky gut is the one thing I haven't really known how to address, since I react badly to marshmallow and slippery elm. So since I have no problems with flax seeds, I think I'll try your flax seed mixture. In which form do you buy the apple pectin? For some reason, I still have problems eating apples - should that make me wary of the apple pectin?

And did you ever try L-glutamine?

Jan

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Hi Bea,

Now, I'm jumping in here as well. Think your approach of 'back to basics' makes a lot of sense. The SCD worked for me - and I don't think I could have improved as much as I have, without being totally committed to it. But hat's simply because my problems must have fitted into the SCD scale (still do as I'm still on it and probably will have to be for years to come), whereas everyone is different, and I think for many a more combined basic diet will be right.

In any case, your comments on leaky gut, allergies and food sensitivities totally hit home for me. Leaky gut is the one thing I haven't really known how to address, since I react badly to marshmallow and slippery elm. So since I have no problems with flax seeds, I think I'll try your flax seed mixture. In which form do you buy the apple pectin? For some reason, I still have problems eating apples - should that make me wary of the apple pectin?

And did you ever try L-glutamine?

Jan

Hi Jan,

Good to see you here too! Am glad the SCD is working for you.

Meanwhile , did you know that flax seeds and apple pectin are not SCD approved since they are mucilaginous? Aside from that, they have this powdered apple pectin you can buy...I too have trouble eating apples but the pectin for me is fine... You could however not use the pectin at all--and the ground up flax seed would do most of what you want anyway... Actually--maybe start with the flax seed and then add the pectin later to see if it agrees with you or not?

Meanwhile I also take nattokinase to get rid of scar tissue (think damaged villi perhaps?) and keep my arteries clean and prevent blood clots. I take it once a day on an empty stomach with plant enzymes by NOW--though any digestive enzyme with bromelain/papain in it that way would do. Not good to take if you are a bleeder or already take coumadin (though personally I think natto is safer). I started taking Vitalzymes some years ago due to scar tissue and resultant chronic pain from a car accident--and then figured out a cheaper way to get the same thing by taking the nattokinase with enzymes. In the meantime I believe it is also helping both my intestinal and kidney villi get to a better state.

Alternatively you can also actually eat natto cakes or make your own very cheaply (google it on the internet). I haven't since I hear they are very smelly. But it could be done. They sell natto cakes in Japanese markets; it is used as a condiment. There is this whole story about how it was discovered by the Samurai (from watching their horses enthusiastically eating the moldy soybeans packed in straw!) as a way to heal and recover from wounds as well as recover their strength.

Bea

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