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Need Advice From Experienced Bread Bakers.

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I used to bake "real" bread when my kids were little. I hadn't made any for years until several months ago. I still wasn't baking gluten-free and the bread I made was OK, but I used to do much better. I suspected I might be noticing a difference because I had a gas stove years ago and I now have a electric stove. THEN--I had to eat gluten-free and I am so dissatisfied with any ready made gluten-free bread that I have been making my own, either from scratch or with mixes. I am using a 8 by 5 aluminum pan which is the correct size for the recipes. I've followed the recipes precisely and I preheat for a long time prior to baking. I bought a thermometer and the oven temp is correct. After the specified baking time the top, when rapped with a knife, sounds hollow. So, why haven't any loaves come out acceptably? The loaves sometimes rise unevenly and produce lopsided bread, and the higher side splits. The center of the bread is always gummy, shiny and never cooked through. Some loaves crumble so badly I can't get reasonably thin slices so I am stuck making sandwiches open faced on a thick slab. I tried using two smaller pans and baking for a few minutes less than the recipe states. Both loaves were cooked thoroughly but they were so small that one slice made a half sandwich.

Of all the bread I have made since September, Pamela's has the least objectionable flavor. I say it this way because I can always taste something "off" in any gluten-free baked goods. Even if I do as many forum members have suggested, and not compare gluten free to baked goods made with gluten, I honestly have to say I don't like the taste of gluten-free. No matter, I need to find bread I don't hate and it is really difficult to compare different recipes or mixes if they aren't properly baked. I have two 8.5 by 4.5 non-stick pans, an aluminum pan that is slightly larger, and a glass pan that is the size of the non-stick pans. It kills me because I have a very expensive clay bread pan that used to bake so well that everything that came out of that pan was really good. I am sure it is porous and won't make gluten-free bread so I haven't used it.

I would appreciate any suggestions anyone has to offer. I really can't decide which recipe or mix best suits me until I can turn out bread that is properly baked. I am unwilling to give up bread and things like corn tortillas or rice cakes don't satisfy me.

Thanks,

Nancy

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I used to bake "real" bread when my kids were little. I hadn't made any for years until several months ago. I still wasn't baking gluten-free and the bread I made was OK, but I used to do much better. I suspected I might be noticing a difference because I had a gas stove years ago and I now have a electric stove. THEN--I had to eat gluten-free and I am so dissatisfied with any ready made gluten-free bread that I have been making my own, either from scratch or with mixes. I am using a 8 by 5 aluminum pan which is the correct size for the recipes. I've followed the recipes precisely and I preheat for a long time prior to baking. I bought a thermometer and the oven temp is correct. After the specified baking time the top, when rapped with a knife, sounds hollow. So, why haven't any loaves come out acceptably? The loaves sometimes rise unevenly and produce lopsided bread, and the higher side splits. The center of the bread is always gummy, shiny and never cooked through. Some loaves crumble so badly I can't get reasonably thin slices so I am stuck making sandwiches open faced on a thick slab. I tried using two smaller pans and baking for a few minutes less than the recipe states. Both loaves were cooked thoroughly but they were so small that one slice made a half sandwich.

Of all the bread I have made since September, Pamela's has the least objectionable flavor. I say it this way because I can always taste something "off" in any gluten-free baked goods. Even if I do as many forum members have suggested, and not compare gluten free to baked goods made with gluten, I honestly have to say I don't like the taste of gluten-free. No matter, I need to find bread I don't hate and it is really difficult to compare different recipes or mixes if they aren't properly baked. I have two 8.5 by 4.5 non-stick pans, an aluminum pan that is slightly larger, and a glass pan that is the size of the non-stick pans. It kills me because I have a very expensive clay bread pan that used to bake so well that everything that came out of that pan was really good. I am sure it is porous and won't make gluten-free bread so I haven't used it.

I would appreciate any suggestions anyone has to offer. I really can't decide which recipe or mix best suits me until I can turn out bread that is properly baked. I am unwilling to give up bread and things like corn tortillas or rice cakes don't satisfy me.

Thanks,

Nancy

The size pan you are using is just fine...I don't think you are cooking it enough...sometimes my bread takes at least 45-55 minutes. There is a trick to gluten-free breads and like you I used to bake my own gluten bread before going gluten-free....Gluten Free Baking is a whole new ball game...

I find it helpful to insert a digital thermometer in your bread to test for doneness...going by the old method to tapping the bottom did not work for me..The internal temperature when your bread is fully baked should be 203-205 degrees F

Using a stand up mixer you must beat it a long time with a paddle attachment for at least 5-6 minutes scrapping sides frequently

I think perhaps the reason you like Pamelas ...is the Sorghum flour...Sorghum Flour is slightly sweet and gives a nice flavor

I find upping the sugar in the bread helps with flavor I have a sweet tooth I add anywhere from 1/4 to 1/3 cup sugar per loaf

Adding in some dry milk and eggs helps with flavor and texture as well

The flours that I use to make my bread is a mixture of Sorghum, Sweet Rice Flour and Tapioca...the mixture of the three makes fabulous bread

The best advice...keep at it and you will find a recipe that works for you...and DON'T GIVE UP!

You deserve good bread....

SORGHUM BREAD

SorghumBread.jpg

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The boxed brand Schar...is german.

It's the best tasting to me. Pamela's never worked...it didn't rise AT all while I followed every instruction to a T. Schar brand is the EASIEST by far and comes with self rising yeast. Basically all you do is mix up all the ingredients, pour in bread pan(s) and let it sit in a warm place with a damp cloth over it for as long as it takes to double in volume. I just set the oven very low, turn it off and set it in there...works well. It rises evenly too.

However I can't seem to figure out how to keep it from being too dry. After baking I let it cool off and it seems to be SO wonderful...that night/day. I've tried a couple different ways to keep it from drying out over the next day or so. Another thing is it stays very dense. It's not holy and fluffy like bakery bread.

But the taste is awesome. Tastes good and yeasty :)

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The size pan you are using is just fine...I don't think you are cooking it enough...sometimes my bread takes at least 45-55 minutes. There is a trick to gluten-free breads and like you I used to bake my own gluten bread before going gluten-free....Gluten Free Baking is a whole new ball game...

I find it helpful to insert a digital thermometer in your bread to test for doneness...going by the old method to tapping the bottom did not work for me..The internal temperature when your bread is fully baked should be 203-205 degrees F

Using a stand up mixer you must beat it a long time with a paddle attachment for at least 5-6 minutes scrapping sides frequently

I think perhaps the reason you like Pamelas ...is the Sorghum flour...Sorghum Flour is slightly sweet and gives a nice flavor

I find upping the sugar in the bread helps with flavor I have a sweet tooth I add anywhere from 1/4 to 1/3 cup sugar per loaf

Adding in some dry milk and eggs helps with flavor and texture as well

The flours that I use to make my bread is a mixture of Sorghum, Sweet Rice Flour and Tapioca...the mixture of the three makes fabulous bread

The best advice...keep at it and you will find a recipe that works for you...and DON'T GIVE UP!

You deserve good bread....

SORGHUM BREAD

SorghumBread.jpg

WOW is all I can say...

That looks so good...and right now even more...omg...

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It would help if you would say which recipes you have tried besides Pamela's, and mention what sort of gluten-free flours you are using. What it sounds like is you are using tapioca flour as at least part of your mix, because it is very gummy when underbaked.

With most gluten-free breads, I don't consider them finished until I have run a clean table knife all the way through and see if it comes out clean when I pull it out. Otherwise, back in the oven it goes for another 5 to 10 minute increments of baking. How long to bake gluten-free breads is variable because there are so many different gluten-free flour blends and each ingredient behaves differently, and the weather and humidity also effect it.

Furthermore, the leavening can affect how long it takes to bake. I stick to baking soda and apple cider vinegar leavened quick breads because I have figured out how they react. An under risen bread tends to turn into a doughy rubber lump.

I stick with the smaller pans, either the 4 x 8" or the mini loaf, for regular loaves, and then the small 8" skillet for the cast iron pan skillet breads that I start on the stovetop and then finish under the broiler. Since I use almond meal and amaranth flour in these, which have some natural binding, added to a bit of sorghum flour, maybe some millet, plus egg, the skillet breads don't even need xanthan gum and a loaf makes 4 splittable triangles for sandwiches or toast.

I also put a few pinches of spices in each loaf, a combination of cumin and sweet spice such as cinnamon and/or nutmeg, just a pinch of each adds a nice flavor, along with the bit of honey. Sometimes I also have used a pinch of Chinese 5 spice powder. (needs to be gluten-free) I don't know why why these spices help but they do. Also a little bit of molasses, like a small teaspoon, helps add flavor. I am a big fan of extra virgin olive oil, as well.

The best EASY basic recipe I have seen is Bette Hagman's Gluten Free Gourmet bakes bread, the quick baking soda leavened yogurt bread recipe. Even if you leave the yogurt out and replace it with water or another alternate milk type product, and add a bit of vinegar, and substitute for some of the flours, it comes out very consistently.

From that, here is a whole grain style gluten-free bread I worked up, it was in this thread here first:

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/index.ph...rt=#entry529726

_____________________________________________________________________

(gluten-free yogurt may be used as part of the liquid, if desired)

Gluten Free Quick Bread, whole grain style no rice, no dairy no soy

pan. loaf. 4" x 8", oiled with olive oil. oven 350

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Go to: http://glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com

Google bread making tips. Also scroll down on the right side for more tips. Karina has lots of experience at baking...could be you need to reduce the water amount.

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