Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

travelthomas

Gluten In Eggs?

Recommended Posts

This is my hen Rosie on the nest. She

Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the olden days (before going gluten free) I use to toss pheasant breasts, a can of cream of mushroom soup and a can of mushrooms into a crock-pot. Everyone loved it.

Gave some to friends to take home. Their ds ate this, went right into anaphylactic shock (he's fine, they had their epi-pen). He's allegic to soy.

We looked everything over that I had used to cook this meal. Nothing contained soy. Being a nurse I started asking the guys where they had shot the pheasants this time. Yep, over at one of the farms who was growing soybeans instead of corn that year.

This wasn't the first time he had eaten this recipe. Wasn't the first time he had pheasant but it was the first time the guys had hunted in the soy fields.


1960s-had symptoms-could have been before but don't remember

1970s-told had colitis or nervous stomach-was given phenobarbital, felt great but still had symptoms

Me, dd and ds diagnosed with Lactose Intolerance

2000-osteopenia

2001-had stroke because of medications I was given

June 2003-saw Chiropractor who specialized in nutrition: Celiac Disease not Lactose Intolerance, went gluten free with once in awhile cheating, off soy and dairy for about 6 months

June 2003-found excellent doctor for fibromyalgia (who has found out she has Celiac Disease)

May 2006-went gluten free with NO cheating-excellent! Made all the difference in the world

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has anyone noticed that if they eat free-range eggs they get a reaction, but not to regular store-bought eggs? (If this has already been discussed here, I apologize -- haven't read the entire thread.)


Gluten Intolerant with double HLA-DQ6. Pre-diagnosis: Weight gain, swelling, diarrhea, mouth sores, back pain, body aches, fatigue, muscle weakness, BRAIN FOG, runny nose, recurrent sinus infections, bruising, low white cell count (whole life), and more. My feet were so bad, I could hardly walk. Toward the end: Chronic Vit. D deficiency (almost no D in my body despite a quality multi-vit. each day).

There is hope! Gluten-free since Sept. '09, and I have my life back - I feel better than in many, many years!

Favorite quotation: "You must do the thing you think you cannot do." - Eleanor Roosevelt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In the olden days (before going gluten free) I use to toss pheasant breasts, a can of cream of mushroom soup and a can of mushrooms into a crock-pot. Everyone loved it.

Gave some to friends to take home. Their ds ate this, went right into anaphylactic shock (he's fine, they had their epi-pen). He's allegic to soy.

We looked everything over that I had used to cook this meal. Nothing contained soy. Being a nurse I started asking the guys where they had shot the pheasants this time. Yep, over at one of the farms who was growing soybeans instead of corn that year.

This wasn't the first time he had eaten this recipe. Wasn't the first time he had pheasant but it was the first time the guys had hunted in the soy fields.

That

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That

Me:
Celiac disease(positive blood work/biopsy- 10/2008), gluten free oat intolerent, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis/Disease, Raynaud's Disease


DS2(age 9):
celiac disease(positive IgA tTG, no biopsy- 11/2010)


DS1(age 13):
repeated negative bloodwork and negative EGD/biopsy. Started on a gluten free trial(8/2011). He has decided to stay gluten free due to all of the improvements he has experienced on the diet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Has anyone noticed that if they eat free-range eggs they get a reaction, but not to regular store-bought eggs? (If this has already been discussed here, I apologize -- haven't read the entire thread.)

I always overcook my eggs when I scramble them, and being egg proteins denature at a relatively low temperature, 176 degrees, I would figure they would become safe from protein reactions.

Even when I use an egg in my Gluten-Free pancake mix, I cook the pancakes thoroughly by using a cover on the frying pan.

P.S., I love banana pancakes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no specific study as to gluten in eggs and, personally, I don't require one. I know that no celiac expert or organization in the world lists eggs as a danger for gluten and I know that celiacs all over the world eat eggs regularly. That's all the proof I need. Being gluten-free can be difficult enough without making up imaginary sources of gluten.

richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

richard,

Thanks for this mornings first laugh. Living with such certainties :lol:

Being gluten-free can be difficult enough without making up imaginary sources of gluten.

Fear based blindness is why so many people currently suffer. Speak no evil, hear no evil, see no evil.

It still would be nice to have a definitive ya or nay based on actual research.

Hear_no_Evil_front.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites