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Why Is This Such A Popular Condition For People To Self Diagnose With?

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Let me say from the start that I do not mean in anyway, to demean the unfortunate condition, that is Celiac Disease. That disclaimer aside, does anyone know what has made this condition so popular? I serve food in a restaurant. The most common "food allergy," that people tell me about is a "gluten allergy." I know that statistically, only about 1 in 150 people have Celiac. So my question is, do any of you know why having a, "gluten allergy," is so popular? It is almost invariably middle aged women who have this "allergy." Why is this so popular as a self-diagnosed "allergy?" Did some celebrity recently declare having it? Help me out in figuring this out if you can.

Cheers,

Dan

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I can understand your questioning all this. First, you say "ONLY" 1 in 150.....do you stop to think how many people that is?? It's HUGE. As for the "self-diagnosing" its mostly because we start having issues and problems and the doctors in the US don't seem to be very knowledgable about it. ONly a few here/there are experts in the Celiac condition. From networking we have learned that doctors in Europe seem much more knowledgable and that's FRUSTRATING! Because after test after test and doctor after doctor we are still having problems and we end up taking upon ourselves to research online and get ideas of what could be bothering us. An elimination diet is the only reliable way to realize that when a certain food is taken away we suddenly start feeling better. Many of the tests are still providing false positives and false negatives. So we do what is necessary to feel better. Self-diagnose. Even an official diagnosis of Celiacs doesn't provide any more ways of dealing with the condition. There is no medicine or way to get over it except eliminating the foods from our diets. So we learn from each other in forums like this. I think since there's such a wide array of symptoms that affects different people in different ways, ALOT more people live with this condition that knows about and blames other things or simply don't know why they are always feeling badly. It doesn't always affect the bowels, it can be in a skin/dematitis form or migraine headaches, brain fogs, jittery insides, etc....see? Symptoms that you wouldn't necessarily think of foods. And no, it's not just middle-aged women. It's little kids, men also. Many mothers are seeing a marked improvement in kids that have been diagnosed with autism when they put their child on a gluten-free diet. It's a very misunderstood and non-understood thing yet. THe only thing certain is that we know when we eat gluten-free, we feel better. Oh, and one more point.....when we do go gluten-free and have to read labels so diligently----it's SHOCKING what all wheat is added into. It's in SO MUCH of our society's normal diets. My own opinion is that by using it as fillers and such, we have been intaking SO MUCH of this stuff over the years that its messed with our bodies. You should take the time to read the labels of everything you purchase at the grocery store sometime and consider the menus at most restaurants. YOU CANNOT GET AWAY FROM THE STUFF!! Anything of that magnitude amount can't be good for anyone!!

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First, I have to issue the disclaimer that I'm not self-diagnosed. I was diagnosed by blood test and endoscopy because I stumbled on a doctor at my university's clinic who knew about celiac disease (also, some people call it "celiacs," which is technically incorrect, as is calling it an allergy - celiac disease is an autoimmune disease and gluten intolerance is just that. It's not like a peanut allergy).

Second, it's worth noting that 97% of people who have celiac disease don't know they have it. That's an enormous number. Expect to hear more people asking for gluten-free meals over the years progress, doctors become more knowledgeable, and people get the appropriate testing. Many doctors still think of it as a pediatric disease, so non-pediatricians don't always think of it, especially when the patient isn't presenting classic symptoms (very thin, diarrhea, stomach aches - not everyone with celiac disease looks like that). That doesn't even include the people who don't have celiac disease, but are still gluten intolerant. I don't know a lot about how gluten intolerance works, but I do know that the non-celiac gluten intolerant can be just as sick as those with celiac, and need to take the diet just as seriously. Eating in restaurants is very scary for anyone who can't eat gluten.

Third, there are, indeed, a few people who are on the diet and don't need to be. I know two people like this - no celiac, no gluten intolerance, just want to go gluten-free for whatever reason. That's their business, and I don't judge them for it. Their food preferences need to be respected, no matter what the reason for them.

Finally, I do appreciate your taking the time to ask about this, but - and I may be reading this wrong, so please tell me if I am - I'm not sure I appreciate the implication that mostly middle-aged women have this "popular" and "self-diagnosed 'allergy'" and that they have needlessly self-diagnosed because some celebrity has it. (Another disclaimer: I am not a middle aged woman, but I hope to be one in 10 years or so.) This might be hitting my ear funny because it seems belittling, because women are often called hysterical or hypochondriacal when they aren't at all. Women and men who are avoiding gluten for their health are not doing so out of a need for attention or a desire to emulate a celebrity. They are taking their well-being seriously. I understand that you may not have meant to imply the whole "hysterical women" thing, but it did come across that way to me. I'm telling you this just so you'll be aware of it, not to be harsh or hostile. Thanks for asking about it, and I hope you continue to learn about celiac disease and gluten intolerance. There are plenty of books out there if you're interested. I like "The Gluten Free Bible."

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Hmmmm.....Biggest reason for self diagnosis is failure of our Medical System!

I think many people self-diagnose Gluten Intolerance and Celiac Disease because our current medical system is failing us with regard to Celiac Disease. I had been to countless doctors for over 25 years with similar versions of the same symptoms that I was finally diagnosed with once they became so severe I wouldn't leave the doctors alone until they found something to explain my condition. 49 different blood tests for mostly thyroid, auto-immune conditions and cancer came back normal (except low iron and D) -- finally a tTG was run and bingo -- but I was only a weak positive -- took biopsy and positive reaction to diet to confirm diagnosis.

During all these years I had researched more medical conditions than I can remember and not once did my search bring me to Celiac -- Why? Probably the same reason no doctor ever thought of it because I presented with weight gain and C, rather than the weight loss and D (side note: my unexplained weight gain over the past 15 years is melting off as we speak -- even my Celiac Specialist told me as many other doctors had that my weight gain despite my claims to exercise a great deal and eat right was a matter of calories going in - BS my system was hording because it wasn't absorbing many nutrients!)

Many doctors including the fairly young one that finally ran the test on me believe that Celiac Disease is only a childhood disease. The only reason my antibody test was run was because when I kept pushing, my primary doctor finally had 4 other internists in her office come into my exam room at the same time -- I told them my history - including pictures of the daily bloat that made me look 8 months pregnant. Those doctors combined thought of 3 diseases that I had not been checked for.

I do believe that the tide is finally beginning to change towards gluten issues because:

1) internet brings the possablity of finding celiac to our fingertips.

2) proactive work that Celiac Disease Foundations are doing to get the word out.

3) many more large hospitals have Celiac Centers -- I know of UCSD, UOC and Maryland off the top of my head -- that are expanding public and medical awareness.

4) many people concerned with good health regularly cut gluten from their diet thereby increasing demand for gluten-free products.

5) Celebrity - I was diagnosed just a week or two before the View Co-Host announced that she was Celiac and was all over the media with it -- it certainly helped me because many more people had heard the word Celiac before I tried to explain it.

6) Word of mouth -- whether one's life improves from removing gluten from your diet due to Celiac or some form of Allergy/Intolerance that person is bound to speak of these positive changes to those around them -- I had never heard the word Celiac before March 6, 2009 and now between myself and my family we have easily explained Celiac to dozens of friends and family members. Three friends of friends have since been diagnosed -- mind you these are not people I know directly just friends of my friends that had been diagnosed with IBS or just had symptoms of IBS!

Great topic!

Oops just re-read and I didn't answer the middle-aged woman part -- Yep, I am a middle aged woman and I am now hopeful that I'll actually make it to be an old lady some day. The reason it is common for middle aged people (this disease is not gender specific) is that anywhere from 35-55 is when symptoms become so severe that (like me) people push to find out the problem because they are finally SURE that there is something seriously wrong - not just irritating or imagined!!! And let's face it women generally talk more than men about most subjects so I guess maybe I do talk more about Celiac than a male in a similar situation would?

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Oops just re-read and I didn't answer the middle-aged woman part -- Yep, I am a middle aged woman and I am now hopeful that I'll actually make it to be an old lady some day. The reason it is common for middle aged people (this disease is not gender specific) is that anywhere from 35-55 is when symptoms become so severe that (like me) people push to find out the problem because they are finally SURE that there is something seriously wrong - not just irritating or imagined!!! And let's face it women generally talk more than men about most subjects so I guess maybe I do talk more about Celiac than a male in a similar situation would?

I think women are socialized to be more willing to talk about their health than men are, and to proactively seek medical attention. This is a socialized thing, not an innate thing, and there are certainly a number of exceptions among both genders. It is interesting, though. I think men are taught to believe, through all sorts of cultural cues, that they're somehow weak if they have a chronic disease. Here, we know that isn't true, and I actually don't know very many men like that myself, but I can see the way culture influences these things.

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There is more awareness now then there was in the past....I think a large part of it is due to the alarming rate that kids are being diagnosed with autism. More parents are searching for ways to help their kids get better, they research and discover that a gluten free diet is helping many kids. This in turn leads to their own self discovery of symptoms they've had for years. This has also led to more products on the market....more people aware of gluten free foods, more articles about Celiac/gluten intolerance reaching the public, etc. I think this is where the awareness is coming from, not so much the medical community, b/c the rate of diagnosis is still way below that of other countries.

Anyway, I also wanted to say that I think the number of people who are on this diet b/c it's "trendy" is small. Sticking to a gluten free diet, especially without a definitive diagnosis, takes diligence and determination. Eating out is such a difficult task for someone trying to avoid gluten, b/c it is everywhere, and it does add stress to what is usually a fun time for everyone else. So just keep that in mind when someone at your restaurant is asking about gluten free, they probably are not part of some new trend, and are really trying to avoid being sick for weeks.

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I forgot about those with autism - that is another big one.

Celiac Disease does not automatically make gluten and/or wheat and allergy for you. I test negative for all food allergies including wheat, but I sure do have the auto-immune reaction to gluten.

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Where did silversail go??! :o

I think we frightened her/him!

FMcGee, THANK YOU!

Here I was, ready to vent, telling silversail that it was an "intolerance" not and "allergy." Oh, I really don't like that post. Sounded terrible! Gotta go to class, but thanks!

Anna

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I've been sick since my early twenties.

First, it was because of college.

I graduated.

Next, it was because of my stressful job.

I quit.

Then, it was because I had kids.

I put them out for adoption---just kidding!

Times passes. I'm still sick with more of my body systems failing me.

Finally, in my late thirties, they decided that all these problems over the last two decades was because I was peri menopausal.

HORSE HOCKEY!!!

I started researching myself and, lo and behold, celiac came up over and over. I am blood and biopsy diagnosed, but I wish I had been smart enough to self diagnose earlier.

Women are hysterical. All our problems, including the ever popular IBS, are because of our periods.

That's what a good portion of the medical community believes in my experience.

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I've been sick since my early twenties.

First, it was because of college.

I graduated.

Next, it was because of my stressful job.

I quit.

Then, it was because I had kids.

I put them out for adoption---just kidding!

Times passes. I'm still sick with more of my body systems failing me.

Finally, in my late thirties, they decided that all these problems over the last two decades was because I was peri menopausal.

HORSE HOCKEY!!!

I started researching myself and, lo and behold, celiac came up over and over. I am blood and biopsy diagnosed, but I wish I had been smart enough to self diagnose earlier.

Women are hysterical. All our problems, including the ever popular IBS, are because of our periods.

That's what a good portion of the medical community believes in my experience.

AMEN!!!!

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Women are hysterical. All our problems, including the ever popular IBS, are because of our periods.

That's what a good portion of the medical community believes in my experience.

This made me laugh out loud! The sad thing is, it's not the medical community - or, not JUST the medical community - it's the culture. I bristle every time I hear a woman write off her legitimate anger or irritation as PMS, so when doctors write things off the same way, it's freakin' infuriating.

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I think "popular" is an unfortunate choice of words. No one would do this willingly.

I would guess that most people with life threatening food allergies don't eat out, the risk is too great. Those of us with gluten issues rarely risk a trip to the ER from a glutening, but we do get really sick, so we are willing to eat out but are very insistent about how our food is prepared.

So what you are seeing is a vocal group of people who are willing to risk a week on the toilet to have an evening out, but still work very hard to avoid that week on the toilet by carefully explaining what will, and won't work in terms of food preparation.

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The 1 in 150, is actually down to 1 in 100. Just FYI. That is for Celiac Disease, I don't believe that includes gluten intolerance.

Gluten intolerance and Celiac Disease are different. When I dine out I usually say I have an allergy to wheat/gluten, however I actually have Celiac Disease. (btw it's Celiac not Celiacs, I hate that...hehe) :P

My reason for this is because its harder to explain to the unknowning waiter/waitress the Celiac Disease part vs just saying I have an allergy (in truth, I actually have that as well as Celiac).

As far as the middle aged woman, I believe I have had this disease since I was 17, I am currently 30, so I would say that as other posters mentioned....we have a tendency to get diagnosed later that we should. It took 9 years for me to get a diag. I do have offical diag from 2 doctors with blood work and my DO has confirmed the allergy as well.

And it's not a fad diet, it may appear that way to the unknowning. B)

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I own two restaurants with gluten free menu's. I've noticed that when I have the celiac association's dine around club out, there are many more women attendee's than men. I think women are more willing to be vocal in restaurant settings than men (there are vocal men too guys so don't get mad at me, I just see more women with gluten free menu's ect. and being very good at stating what they need) However, the ages are across the board such as a mother daughter duo who comes to all the dinners. I think the original poster may have tunnel vision on this one!

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(btw it's Celiac not Celiacs, I hate that...hehe) :P

Seconded. Drives me crazy. Grammatical errors in general drive me nuts (someday, when I rule the world, I will make it illegal to use an apostrophe to make something plural. Apostrophes are never used for plurals, except plural possessive, of course. That's one my students learn about right away!).

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Seconded. Drives me crazy. Grammatical errors in general drive me nuts (someday, when I rule the world, I will make it illegal to use an apostrophe to make something plural. Apostrophes are never used for plurals, except plural possessive, of course. That's one my students learn about right away!).

Hehe. You go girl! :D

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Let me say from the start that I do not mean in anyway, to demean the unfortunate condition, that is Celiac Disease. That disclaimer aside, does anyone know what has made this condition so popular? I serve food in a restaurant. The most common "food allergy," that people tell me about is a "gluten allergy." I know that statistically, only about 1 in 150 people have Celiac. So my question is, do any of you know why having a, "gluten allergy," is so popular? It is almost invariably middle aged women who have this "allergy." Why is this so popular as a self-diagnosed "allergy?" Did some celebrity recently declare having it? Help me out in figuring this out if you can.

Cheers,

Dan

Well, I would first ask where you are from? There are going to be locations where... yeah, there is a little bit of a fad thing going on. Rest assured that those of us who *do* have real gluten issues going on are equally annoyed about it.

Second, there are a whole host of reasons you'll hear it:

  1. It's a medical diagnosis, and they just don't tell you. They may call it an allergy, simply because most restaurants will take that more seriously than "intolerance", and when real, it is much more serious than an "intolerance" like lactose intolerance.
  2. It's real, but the person doesn't have the money for the medical tests. Not everyone has insurance, and an ER isn't going to generally ever look for celiac - it's not "immediately life threatening".
  3. It's real, but the person has had no luck with doctors diagnosing anything helpful. Realize that the average length of time for someone to get a diagnosis in the US is 10 years! Some people take their health into their own hands sooner than that.
  4. It's real, but the person found out by trying the diet, and doesn't want to go back to being sick for three to five months while they eat gluten again in order to be tested.

1% of the people you serve (the statistic is 1 in 133 people) have celiac, and we have *NO IDEA* how many people are non-celiac gluten intolerant, a condition which is only recently being recognized and talked about equally with celiac by the researchers who are in the field, but not yet by the rest of the medical profession). So, if you serve 300 people every day, you should expect 3 celiacs, and probably (this is a guess, but that's all we've got at the moment) at least as many who are "just" gluten intolerant.

Finally, it's because of restaurants, and some servers, who don't take gluten intolerance/celiac seriously that you'll hear them say allergy. We've had too many people on the board or in real life report "so then the server said, 'oh, but you can have a little bit, right'?" or take the bread off a plate or croutons off a salad when sending it back after they forgot about that bit (or tell us "well, you can just pick that off the plate"). Which, for us, is saying "Oh, well, you can just get sick for two weeks, that's fine." Maybe not intentional, but that's what happens.

Hopefully, you'll get more of those are are "for real" and aren't faking, but are understanding about the "difficulty" we present. Yeah, we can be "high maintenance", but we can also be excellent tippers. :)

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In a nut shell the reason is because there is no big drug company interested in Celiac Disease.

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Hopefully, you'll get more of those are are "for real" and aren't faking, but are understanding about the "difficulty" we present. Yeah, we can be "high maintenance", but we can also be excellent tippers. :)

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I tend to use the term allergy when we eat out . . . everyone knows about allergies but most don't know about Celiac Disease. For the sake of speeding up the ordering process, it's just easier to say allergy. We actually say wheat allergy . . . I'm not convinced that most people even know what gluten is (and don't worry, we throw in the barley and rye restrictions, too). Restaurants that offer a gluten free menu are an exception . . .although I still ask a few questions to see how savy they are.

I think women are more willing to be vocal in restaurant settings than men (there are vocal men too guys so don't get mad at me, I just see more women with gluten free menu's ect. and being very good at stating what they need)

I'd have to agree . . . I always have to order for my daughter. My husband totally backs away from that responsibility.

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Believe it or not, there are many people on this forum who will jump through hoops to try to prove that they are not celiac, because it is such a hard diet to follow and they do not want to give up the delicious gluten and put themselves through the necessary restrictions so that they can feel better. Some hope that medical science will develop a pill to cure celiac, because the diet is too hard. And it *is* hard, especially (forgive my criticism here) when we run iinto attitudes such as yours which belittle the condition and mimic what we have been hearing down through the years from our doctors.

I finally gave up even mentioning the subject to my doctors after they wanted to send me to psychologists/psychiatrists for the problems in my "head", and not deal with the problems in my gut. And no, I do not have any problems in my head, that was all in *their* heads.That is why I got on the net and self-diagnosed (at age 65 yet--well past middle age), But my first fully expressed symptoms occurred at age 29. That gives a span of 36 years in which doctors had a chance to diagnose the problem, but the only diagnoses I received were irritable bowel syndrome (why is it irritable, doc?) and fibromyalgia.

It was when I developed rheumatoid arthritis that I took matters into my own hands, because even the rheumatologists are hopeless at diagnosing celiac. Mine said he did not think he had any patients who were diagnosed celiacs, and I said to him that the key word in that sentence was "diagnosed." and asked him if he had ever tested any of his patients. Of course, the answer was no.

So maybe you can stop looking at gluten free as a "fad" and realize that people (your customers) are suffering and have been through a lot to get to this diagnosis (whether self- or doctor-diagnosed) and when they seem to become pests in your restaurant they are trying to avoid suffering and live as normal a life as possible; and that eating in restaurants is the most difficult thing for them to do--makes all the label-reading look easy because we can't read the labels in your restaurant (we have to rely on you to keep us gluten free). We put our faith in you and I would not like to think that that is something you take lightly.

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Women are hysterical. All our problems, including the ever popular IBS, are because of our periods.

That's what a good portion of the medical community believes in my experience.

I finally gave up even mentioning the subject to my doctors after they wanted to send to to psychologists/psychiatrists for the problems in my "head", and not deal with the problems in my gut. And no, I do not have any problems in my head, that was all in *their* heads.

Sad, but very true! I just want to slap the memory of those dismissive doctors -- and I generally am not a violent person :)

I tend to use the term allergy when we eat out . . . everyone knows about allergies but most don't know about Celiac Disease. For the sake of speeding up the ordering process, it's just easier to say allergy. We actually say wheat allergy . . . I'm not convinced that most people even know what gluten is (and don't worry, we throw in the barley and rye restrictions, too). Restaurants that offer a gluten free menu are an exception . . .although I still ask a few questions to see how savy they are.

My son and I order this same way -- then more specific when the rare server says - "Oh you have Celiac Disease" - those words are music to my ears and unfortunately rarely offered.

I read a great example this week...not sure who posted so sorry I'm not giving credit...but I may just try it if I have another dismissive wait person. "If I offered you a bowl of broken glass to eat, would you prefer it if there was just a little broken glass?"

keep smiling! makes people wonder why you are happy :P

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I think that in the past 10 years or so, there has been quite a bit more recognition and research for Celiac. That is probably why you hear more about it these days. Trust me, it is definitely not a fad diet for most people. It is actually incredibly difficult to lead a completely gluten free life and still lead a "normal" life.

From my own personal experience, I have been gluten free since March 2009. I was sick for 9 years before that. And I mean really, really sick. I missed so much work and so many other activities because I could not get up off the bathroom floor. I would pass out, throw up, have horrible stomach pains, unbearable nightmares. I had pains in my muslces and joints so bad I could hardly walk or carry anything. My hair was falling out, I had skin issues, horrible migrains, my vision was getting worse. Since going gluten free, pretty much every single one of those things is GONE!!! I will NEVER NEVER go back to feeling that bad again!

I am only 27 years old, so I don't necessarily put myself into the "middle aged woman" category. I think as many people have said on this thread, it takes a long time for people to get diagnosed sometimes. Like in my case, I've had all these illnesses since I was 18 -- maybe before. If some people really started noticing their issues when they were in their mid-20's to 30's, and it took 10 years for a diagnosis, that could put them in their 40's. That may be why you think you see that age range more. Maybe it is the kind of restaurant you work in, also...maybe the clients that come into that restaurant are just not young teenagers or 20-somethings.

And for Celiac sufferers, eating out at restaurants is a really terrifying, stressful, anxiety ridden experience. I feel SO GOOD overall now compared to what I did, the thought of accidentally being glutened and having to feel that way for two weeks or more is just an unacceptable option for me. I actually have nightmares about it sometimes! :rolleyes: It's very important to our health as Celiac sufferers to be completely gluten free. In addition to all the stomach problems, Celiac can also contribute to diabetes, other autoimmune diseases, miscarriages, and even cancer. I really do not want to have anything additional, would like to have kids some day, and would like to keep my cancer chances as low as possible! For me, the choice to be gluten free is not really a choice...it's simply a decision to live rather than die.

That's why we are so fanatical when we go to restaurants. That's also why we tend to frequent and be repeat customers at restaurants where we receive great service and where the staff are knowledgable about our condition. I can tell you that I recently had an AMAZING experience eating at a local upscale brewery (of all places!) in my city. I explained to the waiter that I had celiac, which was essentially an allergy to wheat, rye, oats, and barley and anything made from those. He said he completely understood what that was, had experience serving other customers with that issue. He brought the manager over and explained my situation. They were both VERY VERY nice and respectful and understanding. I felt like they were there to make sure I was happy instead of in some restaurants where I have felt like a burden. They brough their head chef out then and he personally went over the menu with me, explained which dishes I could eat and how they would change them to make them gluten free. The chef then walked me back to the entryway of the kitchen. He showed me where they would be cooking my food, which pans they would be using (newly cleaned ones), and how they would ensure my food would not be cross contaminated. Then he and the manager asked if there was anything additional they could do to make me feel more comfortable prior to cooking my food. I said no, thank you so much for the help, and I went back to my table with my friends and family. I am the only celiac sufferer in the group, and they were all jealous of the personal attention I received! :D When our meals were ready, the waiter brought over the rest of the table's food, and the head chef brought my meal out personally. He explained again the changes they made to the meal and he left it with me. I started eating it (it was absolutely INCREDIBLE, by the way!!) and the manager came right over to make sure everything was just perfect! I completely enjoyed my meal and time with my family and friends and it was one of the least stressful times I've ever had ordering since going gluten free! Needless to say, I will be going back there quite often! Also, just to make the point that Celiac individuals GREATLY appreciate the extra effort and attention given to our meals, our ENTIRE party tipped 40% on the bill.

I only tell you that to show you how serious Celiac is and how much we appreciate being given a stress free meal out. It doesn't happen often, but we DEFINITELY remember it when it does. I am planning on sending the owner of the company a very personal letter regarding the excellent service I received there from the waiter, manager, and chef. I can tell you, too, on the flipside, the places we have gone to where I was treated like it was a "fad" condition, like you stated, or where the waiters are like "umm...we have white bread instead of wheat bread" -- we NEVER go back to those places. Just think about how quickly a place would go out of business if they were incredibly rude to one out of every 133 customers. If management in a place received complaints from one out of every 133 customers, how long do you think the staff would remain employed?

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Just to add-you can't tell who's real and who's just trying out the latest thing they heard on Ellen by looking. We come in both sexes and every height/weight/skin color known. There is no typical celiac. We don't necessarily look sick. We'd like to stay that way, and the way to do that is to ask you about the meal we are trusting you to bring. If someone says it, you have to believe it. If they grill you over what's in the sauce and then have a big piece of cake for dessert, remember stupid people come in both sexes and every height/weight / skin color, too.

I hope we've given you a bit of insight into what it's like for us. I do miss eating out. I miss having food delivered on hectic days. I tip HUGE when a server is gets it and takes care of me.

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I can tell you that I recently had an AMAZING experience eating at a local upscale brewery (of all places!) in my city.

If you send me the name of this restaurant I will send them an emailing telling them I heard they had fantastic service for celiacs. Also if you post the restaurant's name and the city it's located in under the restaurant section when others visit that area they will know where to go eat. Nice to hear of such a great dinning experience.

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/index.php?showforum=28

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