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CecilyF

Gluten Free Foods

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Can anybody give me a starting list of staples to stock my pantry and fridge with? I'm so overwhelmed I do not even know where to start.

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Hi CecilyF!

I feel your pain, as I'm new to this as well. Just my advice as a newbie who's been doing this for several weeks...stock it with basic whole foods for now...meats (if you eat them), beans, rice, veggies, fruit. As you go, you may discover additional food issues (I can't have dairy or nuts now) which makes things a bit more complicated. It gets better, I swear it does! But it can be a bit daunting. However, I've been doing amazing things with some basic cookbooks (5 ingredients or less, and I modify according to my needs) that use simple ingredients and very little processed foods. For now, until my system heals, it's working pretty well, and I feel MUCH better.

Take it slowly, and don't lose hope - you'll get the hang of it. I'm in the same boat, but have realized there are so many possibilities open to me now, where before I would avoid them and eat junk because it was fast and easy. Now I can eat real food and still prepare it quickly. I just have to plan ahead. You can do it!

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Thank you so much! I know I can do this - I have got to do this. Just dreading shopping, reading labels and cooking. Got to look at this as one of life's adventures! :D

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The advice to go with whole unprocessed foods is a good one. I don't know where you are but if you have a Wegmans nearby they label all their gluten-free stuff with a circle G. They make shopping for prepared stuff a lot easier for me.

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Ravenwoodglass - thank you! I just started shopping at our Wegman's regularly, and I didn't know that! That's awesome!

CecilyF - a friend of mine who also has celiac just said the same thing. This life of gluten free is an adventure, so it's going to have upside and downsides. Enjoy the ride. ;)

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I'd suggest starting at WalMart and taking a cell phone so you can call companies if you need to. WalMart makes their 'Great Value' generic suppliers clearly list gluten. At first when you have to shop gluten-free it's so confusing you start to doubt every product, so it's nice to pick up a package of generic WalMart cream cheese and see right on the label: 'naturally gluten free'. And you're just buying regular food, at the regular price.

Everyone's tastes differ, but here's the staples in my kitchen:

Milk - regular and soy, including chocolate soy milk (not bad!)

Peanut butter -most are okay - I know Jif is

Nuts (read labels and watch for cc - there's a thread right now about nuts)

Fruit - nice and easy, sweet, healthy. Add peanut butter and it's a snack that sticks with you

Eggs

Chex cereal - I like the chocolate and corn - there's some threads right now about chex

Small Red Potatoes (it's so easy to nuke a few for 2-3 minutes then cut them up and fry them with butter or oil - I don't peel them - with an egg or two that was breakfast my first few weeks of going gluten-free. Usually I would skip breakfast, but my first several weeks on gluten-free I was so HUNGRY all the time...) I also use them to make mashed potatoes, again without peeling.

Onions, green peppers - I use them in a lot of cooking

Cheeses - velveeta and shredded cheddar and provolone (read the label on the shredded, velveeta is okay) - I like to put cheese on a lot of things

Bacon and Ham - read the label - Hormel will state if it's gluten-free, as well as WalMart GV brand

Rice - I substitute rice for pasta in a lot of recipes. I also try to keep some cooked rice in the fridge and some mornings I mix the rice with eggs, sautee some onions and peppers and ham or bacon, add a little cheese, and make a rice patty.

Chicken, Beef, Pork - read the label - a lot of chicken has broth injected for flavor and weight. Perdue 'tender and tasty' tenderloins are gluten-free, plus they answer the phone and can tell you right then if the product in your hand at the grocery store is safe (I've only called during business hours - but you can also go to their website). Giant Eagle also has 'Nature's basket' chicken that is gluten-free. There's a discussion going on now about chicken around here. I recently got a Hormel pork roast that was labeled 'gluten free'. If you don't already cook, buy 'The Joy of Cooking' and start trying some things out.

Progresso soup, there's a few that are gluten-free: http://www.liveglutenfreely.com/products/d....aspx#progresso

Progresso french onion soup was the first processed thing I had after going gluten-free, and I put a ton of provolone cheese on top. I felt 'normal' - and I hope I don't get bashed for using that word.

Vegetables, of course. Unless they are processed in some way, veggies are okay. If you want to be doubly sure, then, like I said, shop at WalMart and you'll feel reassured when you pick up a can of peas and it says 'naturally gluten free'.

Those are the basics in my cabinets. Plus candy. I wrote in another thread that I like to have a stash of candy so I don't feel deprived. My personal favorites are york peppermint patties, reese peanut butter cups, and sour patch kids.

I have called companies a lot from the grocery store. Giant Eagle's nutritionist, however, replies in 2-3 days. Usually I want an answer right away because I'm standing in the aisle. Get to know which brands/companies don't 'hide' gluten, such as Kraft and ConAgra, and that will make shopping easier. Google that phrase, there's lists here somewhere.

Good luck.

- Stacy

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A list of mainstream products that can be found at almost any grocery store...this is the website: (just copy and paste in address box)

www.homepage.mac.com/sholland/celiac/GFfoodlist.pdf

some of my favorites include the following:

Rice Chex cereal, Corn chex cereal, and cinnamon rice chex, chocolate rice chex (will list on the

package if it is gluten free!

Quaker Instant and Quick Grits (add a slice of velveeta cheese for cheese grits)

Ortega Yellow corn taco shells

Van's Waffles

Carnation hot chocolate mixes

Sunny Delight

Envirokidz Amazon Frosted Flakes

Golden Flake Snack Foods: all potato chips, corn chips, tortilla chips, cheese puffs, cheese curls

Amy's Kitchen Organic Salsa

Midel Chocolate chip cookies

Blue Diamond Nut Thins Almond (crackers)

Glutino Cheese crackers

Eagle Brand condensed milk

Cool Whip

Lactaid Milk

Lactaid cottage cheese

Yoplait Yogurt - All except crunchies ( like granola, graham crackers, etc)

Jello Brand Jello snacks

Hunt's Snack Pack Pudding - all except crunchies

Ice Cream (check labels)

All canned or frozen fruit not containing gluten ingredients (Delmonte)

All canned or frozen vegetables not containing gluten ingredients (Delmonte)

Oscar Mayer All Beef Hot dogs

Bryan All Beef or turkey Smoked Sausage

Sara Lee Cooked Ham

Kinnikinnick Bread (frozen food section)

Mustard, Mayonaise, Ketchup not containing gluten ingredients

Reese's Peanut Butter

Aunt Jemima Syrup

Contadina Pizza Squeeze

Hormel Pepperoni

Bush's Baked Beans

Ore Ida Hash Browns and French Fries

Go check this site out it is very helpful!

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Hmm, tryin' to think. When I started I went to Whole Foods, and now some stores where I live have a dedicated generic "health" section which seem to include gluten free stuff. And I bought gluten-free pasta, some gluten-free crackers, etc. Just to have some stuff to munch on. Salad, lettuce, all that is good. I like Drew's dressing. Again a whole' food's would have Drews and Amy's makes some gluten free salad dressing.

What else...the stuff other people said, like basic meat that you can bake/cook yourself and season with salt and lemon or some such thing.

Simply Asia makes some easy-to-prepare soups, and the back labels which are gluten-free. Those are good.

Corn tortillas were something I had in my fridge starting out as well.

UTZ potato chips do a good job labelling if they are gluten free. Sometimes I buy it just to support the fact that they label it as such. I think Kettle chips do, too (look on the back, I think it says if it's gluten free or not...)

Eggs are good too.

Uhh...not sure if I'm helping. It takes time. But you'll get there, slowly your pantry will build up. Just takes calling companies to check if their product is safe, investigating online, etc. I'm still slowly adding thing to my pantry (3 years later). It is overwhelming but...I guess I sort of wimped out and went to health food stores first, buying things that were clearly labeled Gluten Free. Then in time began figuring out what "normal" products were gluten free, too... Anyway, don't try to figure it all out at once, because you won't :) Just take small steps, go with what people on here are suggesting, and as you live day-to-day life you'll learn!

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Where do you get corn tortillas? I can find them in chip form, but not the soft form others have mentioned.

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Does the food need to be just gluten free or does it have to be dairy free as well?

The gluten free specific foods that I keep stocked are:

Tinkyada gluten-free pasta. This is my favorite brand, but don't follow the directions on the box. Get a good rolling boil then put the pasta in and boil for 10 minutes. I find that if you cook it as long as it says to it falls apart. It has the texture of regular pasta and I've even used it for baked spaghetti and macaroni and cheese that you bake and I can't tell the difference between it and regular pasta.

gluten-free flour. I don't have a particular brand that I use, so I don't have a favorite. I just substitute this for small amounts of regular flour. You can also use cornstarch a lot of times, so have some of that on hand too.

Rice chex or corn chex It's yummy to eat as cereal or a snack, but you can also crush it up and use it to substitute for sweet crumbs like ground graham crackers, nilla wafers, etc. I made baked scallops using this as breading and I got so many compliments!

Plain lays potato chips I use these in place of ground up crackers and bread crumbs in recipes like meatballs, meatloaf, salmon patties, etc. I think it actually tastes better than bread crumbs.

gluten free soy sauce I use soy sauce in a lot of recipes so I always have some on hand.

gluten free bread I think Kinnikinnick is pretty good, but you'll just have to try them and see.

Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce

Heinz ketchup

Health Valley Organic Soups Many varieties are gluten free, so I always stock up. I usually get cream of mushroom and tomato, but I know they have cream of chicken and vegetable that are gluten free. A lot of recipes call for a can of cream of mushroom or tomato so this is what I use.

Hormel Herb-Ox Bouillon It's one of the few varieties that are gluten free

Sweet Baby Ray's BBQ sauce

Hellman's Mayo

Hagen Daz

corn meal For breading fried foods

yoplait yogurt

These are my staples. I really only go to the health food store for the soup, flour, pasta and bread. The rest I can get at the regular store. I guess it just depends on what you like to eat. I make most things from scratch. It's a little harder if you don't like to cook as much. The rest of the food I get is like fresh, frozen or canned veggies and fruits, Fresh or frozen meats, cheeses (watch out for the shredded kind, processed kind, or cheeses with smoke flavoring), eggs, butter, milk, and rice.

Let me know if you want any recipes, I have lots!

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You gals are GREAT! I really appreciate the help and information.

Thanks a bunch! :D

Does the food need to be just gluten free or does it have to be dairy free as well?

The gluten free specific foods that I keep stocked are:

Tinkyada gluten-free pasta. This is my favorite brand, but don't follow the directions on the box. Get a good rolling boil then put the pasta in and boil for 10 minutes. I find that if you cook it as long as it says to it falls apart. It has the texture of regular pasta and I've even used it for baked spaghetti and macaroni and cheese that you bake and I can't tell the difference between it and regular pasta.

gluten-free flour. I don't have a particular brand that I use, so I don't have a favorite. I just substitute this for small amounts of regular flour. You can also use cornstarch a lot of times, so have some of that on hand too.

Rice chex or corn chex It's yummy to eat as cereal or a snack, but you can also crush it up and use it to substitute for sweet crumbs like ground graham crackers, nilla wafers, etc. I made baked scallops using this as breading and I got so many compliments!

Plain lays potato chips I use these in place of ground up crackers and bread crumbs in recipes like meatballs, meatloaf, salmon patties, etc. I think it actually tastes better than bread crumbs.

gluten free soy sauce I use soy sauce in a lot of recipes so I always have some on hand.

gluten free bread I think Kinnikinnick is pretty good, but you'll just have to try them and see.

Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce

Heinz ketchup

Health Valley Organic Soups Many varieties are gluten free, so I always stock up. I usually get cream of mushroom and tomato, but I know they have cream of chicken and vegetable that are gluten free. A lot of recipes call for a can of cream of mushroom or tomato so this is what I use.

Hormel Herb-Ox Bouillon It's one of the few varieties that are gluten free

Sweet Baby Ray's BBQ sauce

Hellman's Mayo

Hagen Daz

corn meal For breading fried foods

yoplait yogurt

These are my staples. I really only go to the health food store for the soup, flour, pasta and bread. The rest I can get at the regular store. I guess it just depends on what you like to eat. I make most things from scratch. It's a little harder if you don't like to cook as much. The rest of the food I get is like fresh, frozen or canned veggies and fruits, Fresh or frozen meats, cheeses (watch out for the shredded kind, processed kind, or cheeses with smoke flavoring), eggs, butter, milk, and rice.

Let me know if you want any recipes, I have lots!

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I sure hope I get over my dairy, egg and soy intolerances so going gluten free won't be so limiting. The foods listed all so so good right now. I didn't have an appetite for over a year and it's just starting in. I'm getting sick of plain meat and vegetables but don't think I'll ever get sick of brown rice and fruit. Fruit keeps me going. I sure hope I am not fructose intolerant, too.

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Where do you get corn tortillas? I can find them in chip form, but not the soft form others have mentioned.

I got corn tortillas just in a generic food store, not even in a health section or anything. I'm not sure what aisle they'd be grouped in...since it probably depends on the store. I think in Kroger it was near the olives and spaghetti sauce, or something weird. But...the point...I think they can be found in any ol' grocery store. Maybe just ask a grocery person next time. They are in a bag. I remember seeing more than one brand, and one had 'gluten free' on it so I went with it. But the other might have been okay as well....

Hope that helped.

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It did help! Thank you - I found them!

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Can anybody give me a starting list of staples to stock my pantry and fridge with? I'm so overwhelmed I do not even know where to start.

Hi Cecily!

I totally relate with the feeling. I would suggest that you start with a switch to unprocessed foods (fresh/dried/frozen fruit, veggies, meats, eggs, etc). Give away all your condiments (dressings, sauces, etc) and mixed seasonings and mixed spices. Also any plastic bowls or utensils you have used for anything like pasta, bread, cereal, etc. This will help several things - it will give you some mental breathing room where you can focus on learning what gluten is, what it is in, issues of cross-contamination, and so on and it will help your body get some probably desperately needed nutrients.

2nd get the book 'Gluten-Free Living for Dummies' off Amazon. This book was given to me by a friend in my first week and it was a life (and sanity) saver for me. :)

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Where do you get corn tortillas? I can find them in chip form, but not the soft form others have mentioned.

Make sure you call the companies that make the soft corn tortillas to make sure they're gluten free. I got one kind and got really sick. I never called them because it was a Mexican company (we have a lot of family owned ethnic grocery stores in our town) to ask about it but I think they probably use the same machinery for the flour tortillas too.

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Actually, I found them, and they taste horrible. Like dry, bland corn...cardboard. I have no idea what to do with them now. :(

Just a thought on books....the new foods were costing me so much - and I'm not talking processed, I'm talking just stocking up on healthier, naturally gluten free stuff - that I couldn't afford to buy books. So I checked out my county library network. I have at least seven books waiting for me at home to read this weekend. So you can get a lot of gluten free info - including the dummies book! - for free.

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Actually, I found them, and they taste horrible. Like dry, bland corn...cardboard. I have no idea what to do with them now. :(

Just a thought on books....the new foods were costing me so much - and I'm not talking processed, I'm talking just stocking up on healthier, naturally gluten free stuff - that I couldn't afford to buy books. So I checked out my county library network. I have at least seven books waiting for me at home to read this weekend. So you can get a lot of gluten free info - including the dummies book! - for free.

LOL - I had the same experience the first time. They have to be eaten warm. Grill them in a pan with a little coconut oil (or oil of your preference) or oil-free in a good non-stick skillet (gluten free of course!) :) Then serve them with whatever.

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LOL - I had the same experience the first time. They have to be eaten warm. Grill them in a pan with a little coconut oil (or oil of your preference) or oil-free in a good non-stick skillet (gluten free of course!) :) Then serve them with whatever.

Ah...I'll try that the next time! Thanks!

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Ah...I'll try that the next time! Thanks!

Haha yeah um...that's why those are what I had when starting out, but not anymore. :ph34r: Because I thought they tasted pretty crappy. Warming them up does help but...eeh. Would rather use something else like glutino bread or whatever.

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Another thing you can do with corn tortillas is make mini pizzas. Bake them a little in the oven, brush with olive oil, add a sauce and whatever toppings you like, then bake again until done. Yummy.

richard

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WOW what great lists to have! These are actual normal foods laughs. I already eat a lot of them so now i don't feel so bad either....It can be a daunting process starting out....my hubby is just upset because now we wont be having Kraft mac and cheese all the time. He's such a big kid but I love him :) Are Gluten-Free pastas available at walmart too or do I have to go to a health food store for them?

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If you can find a gluten free enchilada sauce you can make enchilada's with the corn tortillas too. :)

I also heat my corn tortillas up in a little oil in a skillet and then make soft tacos out of them and they are very yummy.

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For the Original poster: I'm still relatively new to this. If I have to buy something that isn't a single ingredient food, I try to stick to the big companies that will clearly list gluten ingredients on their labels. For me, mainly Kraft, ConAgra, & Unilever. Each of those companies have several different brands, so I can find one of their brands for almost anything I want to buy.

Actually, I found them, and they taste horrible. Like dry, bland corn...cardboard. I have no idea what to do with them now. :( [\quote]

Chicken enchiladas of course!!

I've never been able to roll the corn tortillas, so I just rip them up and put some on the bottom of the dish

Then add some chicken-sauted with some garlic & onion.

Add some more corn tortillas

Make my own sauce (tomatoes, chicken broth, garlic, some italian spices, green chile, little bit of corn starch-reduce to thicken a bit)

Pour enchilada sauce over chicken

Top with cheese-lots of cheese!

Bake

Top with sour cream!

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