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G-freegal12

Amy's Makes Me Sad...

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Amys claims some of its soups and microwave meals are g.f. :angry: I got sick and we read the small print...cross contamination... :blink:

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As much as I agree with you that Amy's makes us all sad.......they're not really liars. Their products technically are gluten free, so they can be listed as such. But the cross contamination seemingly gets all of us sick, even those that aren't that sensitive. I've been gluten free for 6 years and Amy's has always made me sick...so I gave up on them. You'd think they'd make changes because I know that this has been a huge complaint for as long as I've been gluten free!

I'm sorry you got sick........we've all gone through the learning curve before we find what works best for us. I know its frustrating because we all want a quick meal, but sometimes its better to just put the time in ourselves and cook!

Although...if Pillsbury would go ahead and make some of those crescent rolls gluten free, that would be the best thing in the world!!

Hope you feel better!!

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if Pillsbury would go ahead and make some of those crescent rolls gluten free, that would be the best thing in the world!!

You're not kidding!!!! My next baking project is to see if I can find a croissant type recipe. I figure I probably can't make the real thing, but I'm going to give it a try!

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Yup - they're not lying; they do not add any gluten ingredients to their "gluten free" items. But if you are sensitive enough that you react for cross contamination, you have to read packages for the "made in a shared facility" or "made on shared equipment" statements.

And remember, unless you never allow anyone to bring anything containing gluten in through your front door, your house is a shared facility. If that gluten makes it into the kitchen, you have shared equipment.

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Amys claims some of its soups and microwave meals are g.f. :angry: I got sick and we read the small print...cross contamination... :blink:

I'm sorry you got sick (I've been there) but they didn't lie. The label said shared equipment or facility which is true of may many products. Like tarnalberry said, your kitchen is a shared facility. I hope you feel better soon.

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Got to read those labels. At least Amy's was honest enough to say their products are made in a shared facility. You HAVE to read the fine print, ALWAYS. Gluten-free does not always mean free of cross contamination from gluten.

A lot of products make me sad.

Ate Sunbutter. Two spoons of this stuff was enough to make myself and another family member sick. They claim on their website "all of our products are completely peanut free, tree-nut free, and gluten free. Our sunflower seed spreads are all processed in a peanut and tree-nut free facility." So they respect those with peanut/nut allergies by keeping a nut free facility. Called the manufacturer and apparently a trail mix with a powdered gluten coating is manufactured in the facility. I would rather a company NOT claim gluten free or clearly state on the label MADE IN A FACILITY THAT PROCESSES GLUTEN CONTAINING PRODUCTS than pretend to be gluten free. At least this way the consumer can make an informed choice.

Companies would have lawsuits out the kazoo if they claimed "PEANUT FREE" while selling to the peanut allergic demographic if their products had cc issues with peanuts.

But because 1) there is no law standardizing what is "GLUTEN FREE"

2) celiac disease is still an under-recognized condition, and

3) there is no IMMEDIATE life threatening reaction (i.e. anaphylaxis) when ingesting gluten,

everyone and anyone who wants to can ride the new GLUTEN FREE "fad train" just by not adding gluten ingredients.

Companies that think it's a fad or a diet craze, or just not that big of a deal with cc, need to get it into their heads that celiac disease is a real illness and some people become very ill from cross contamination.

Things really need to change.

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My husband has cinnamon rolls and Fruit Loops in our kitchen. By the logic presented here so far, I'd never be able to call anything I cooked in my kitchen gluten free because it's a shared facility. And... well... I'd have to disagree with you on that one.

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Am I the only one who eats Amy's regularly and doesn't get sick? :huh: I eat some of her soups, some of her salad dressing, her (rice pasta) mac n' cheese, (rice crust) pizza now and then (although I don't like how it tastes), and cheese enchiladas. I've tried some of her other microwave stuff but really think it tastes kinda bad. But the rest, I eat frequently.

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My husband has cinnamon rolls and Fruit Loops in our kitchen. By the logic presented here so far, I'd never be able to call anything I cooked in my kitchen gluten free because it's a shared facility. And... well... I'd have to disagree with you on that one.

To be fair the difference is WHO gets sick.

The problem is the law allows it and Amy's are a business.

The primary reason for a business is to make as much money for shareholders as possible ... the second reason is to provide as much money to shareholders as possible.

Whilst companies are allowed to label gluten-free when it is not they will continue to do so.

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Amy's does a lot to prevent cross contamination and they have improved their process greatly in the past few years. Here's a recent email from them about this:

Our gluten free products contain only the ingredients listed in the ingredient statement. There are no hidden, unlabeled ingredients. We understand that it is critical that these products be free of gluten and we take this very seriously.

A wide range of activities and cross-checks are completed to ensure that cross contamination and/or inadvertent use of the wrong ingredient does not occur.

Examples include:

- Full shift manufacture of products with complete clean-up of all food contact surfaces between products. Pieces of equipment that come in contact with the food are cleaned and sanitized prior to the manufacture of the next product.

- Separate item numbers for all ingredients; these are checked by two individuals on receipt of the ingredient and three people on use of the ingredient to confirm the correct item is used.

- Use of colored tags, papers and containers in production as an addition visual check to ensure intermediate components are not interchanged.

- Designated areas for flour use to control airborne gluten and minimize its spread.

- Bar code readers at packaging lines to ensure correct package is used with each product.

- Spot screening of ingredients and finished products at University of Nebraska (FARRP - Food Allergy Research and Resource Program) to confirm there are no unlabeled allergens (utilize tests for gluten, soy, milk and peanuts).

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I would be curious to know what it is that makes so many sick on Amy's food, though. I had some of her things in the beginning, and I got so sick, I'm scared to get near them again. But I'm not usually that sensitive to CC (from what I've experienced so far). But it was definitely her food that made me sick (I'd had little else to eat that day) and I was brutally sick afterwards.

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I would be curious to know what it is that makes so many sick on Amy's food, though. I had some of her things in the beginning, and I got so sick, I'm scared to get near them again. But I'm not usually that sensitive to CC (from what I've experienced so far). But it was definitely her food that made me sick (I'd had little else to eat that day) and I was brutally sick afterwards.

Possibly the degree of CC? Early on I had some foods that were produced on the same line as gluten containing products, now I can't even have ones that are in a shared facility unless they are very rigorous in their cleaning process (dried beans that have been triple washed seem to be OK for me for example).

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Amy's does a lot to prevent cross contamination and they have improved their process greatly in the past few years. Here's a recent email from them about this:

Our gluten free products contain only the ingredients listed in the ingredient statement. There are no hidden, unlabeled ingredients. We understand that it is critical that these products be free of gluten and we take this very seriously.

A wide range of activities and cross-checks are completed to ensure that cross contamination and/or inadvertent use of the wrong ingredient does not occur.

Examples include:

- Full shift manufacture of products with complete clean-up of all food contact surfaces between products. Pieces of equipment that come in contact with the food are cleaned and sanitized prior to the manufacture of the next product.

- Separate item numbers for all ingredients; these are checked by two individuals on receipt of the ingredient and three people on use of the ingredient to confirm the correct item is used.

- Use of colored tags, papers and containers in production as an addition visual check to ensure intermediate components are not interchanged.

- Designated areas for flour use to control airborne gluten and minimize its spread.

- Bar code readers at packaging lines to ensure correct package is used with each product.

- Spot screening of ingredients and finished products at University of Nebraska (FARRP - Food Allergy Research and Resource Program) to confirm there are no unlabeled allergens (utilize tests for gluten, soy, milk and peanuts).

What does that guarantee?

If they are deliberately misleading nothing here is actionable:

What exactly could you sue them for if you had food analyzed and found gluten?

Specifically:

Spot screening of ingredients and finished products at University of Nebraska (FARRP - Food Allergy Research and Resource Program) to confirm there are no unlabeled allergens (utilize tests for gluten, soy, milk and peanuts)

So what it doesn't say they would withdraw a product if an allergen was found. It means nothing and does not specify what tests and sensitivity are used nor how often (once in ten years or once in twenty??)

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The other thing people need to remember is that Amy's is not Glutino or gluten-free Pantry. Their foods are not dedicated to the gluten-free population- they are VEGETARIAN.

For some it could be the degree of CC (but when I had my worst reaction they sent a sample to the University of Nebraska from my batch and it only had 33 ppm which is not a lot). It could be that some react to dairy or soy in their products.

Also, now that I have been gluten-free for 5 years I do NOT react to Amy's anymore. I really only eat the rice crust pizza but I have not had a problem in a long time. I learned that I had other issues besides Celiac so it's entirely possible, in my case, that some of my reactions were not to gluten.

I have Lyme and 4 other tick-borne infections. Two of them, as well as Lyme, are notorious for causing digestive symptoms.

Bottom line is if you are sensitive or getting sick all the time, it's probably best not to eat processed food until you figure out if you are intolerant to other foods, healing etc.

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The other thing people need to remember is that Amy's is not Glutino or gluten-free Pantry. Their foods are not dedicated to the gluten-free population- they are VEGETARIAN.

For some it could be the degree of CC (but when I had my worst reaction they sent a sample to the University of Nebraska from my batch and it only had 33 ppm which is not a lot). It could be that some react to dairy or soy in their products.

I suspect the combination can be a problem:

I am hardly allergic to either Soy or Casein, unless I get glutened!

33ppm is 'not a lot' in some ways but certainly enough?

Moreover: Your worse reaction doesn't mean the most gluten in a batch ... it could simply be an accumulation over a week or so.

I know myself I can often get away with a slice or two of CODEX bread... but I know I can't do a loaf .. even over a week. Eating Amy's (and other similar) even if it is 15ppm on a regular basis is I suspect going to get a lot of people ...

Also: 33ppm is also a HUGE amount in terms of cleaning a production line if you compare it to a lab. For a lab to have 33ppm contamination in equipment would have them closed down. It is beyond a forgivable accident by a factor of several hundred ... so when it comes to cleaning equipment with allergens the same standards should be adhered to.

The reason I point this out is that there is cleaning and cleaning....

It also will depend massively on WHAT is being prepared first...

I think a classic example of uncleanable is a pasta machine... Its a combination of the complexity of the machine and what goes through it.

A lab which had contamination of that amount would be closed down: A food manufacturer? Nothing...

Back to my point: Even though it contained 33ppm there is no comeback ...

If a lab had equipment it couldn't clean it would dispose of it.... not because they want to but because they would be closed down of they got discovered.

If labs can do it then why not food manufacturers?

What happened to the batch ? Was it recalled? Again .. no comeback because nothing is legally binding.

Bottom line is if you are sensitive or getting sick all the time, it's probably best not to eat processed food until you figure out if you are intolerant to other foods, healing etc.

Nearly all processed foods carry the inherent risk not to mention the addition of other allergens which can compound the problems.

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Am I the only one who eats Amy's regularly and doesn't get sick? :huh: I eat some of her soups, some of her salad dressing, her (rice pasta) mac n' cheese, (rice crust) pizza now and then (although I don't like how it tastes), and cheese enchiladas. I've tried some of her other microwave stuff but really think it tastes kinda bad. But the rest, I eat frequently.

Nope--I've never had a problem either. I occasionaley eat her dairy free gluten free pizza, i eat lots of her gluten free soups and we keep frozen meals in the freezer incase i go somewhere to a friends over night or something. last week i spent the night at my friends, and i tried the enchilada(the dairy free gluten free) and i had no reaction either. I guess it depends on the person?

Also, it could be because i always get the dairy free ones too. I react with stomach cramps, even to a little "butter flavor--from real butter" in gluten free crackers, so maybe the ones with cheese are causing reactions?

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I really hope some guidelines are made soon...my stomach will thank the person who does it tremendously! :lol:

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I had a reaction today to an Amy's Pizza. However it is possible it was just my body being super sensitive to processed foods. Everything I have made for the past 10 days since being dx'd has been home made except for some Larabars. So I am thinking that maybe the CC got me? I thought it could be the toaster too but I have been using that daily w/no problem so...we'll see. I'm not dying, just not feeling great. It was a much more minor reaction than I have had in the past.

I have eaten other Amy's stuff and had no problem so I will give it another shot in a few weeks and see what happens.

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Well, I eat Amy's Bistro Burgers almost everyday with no problems. :)

That said, I often will mildly react to many brands of gluten-free pizza or bread, perhaps it is that some "gluten free" grains can be CC at the source? It could be the yeast, it could be to much dairy that day, it could be a whole host of things that accumulate into a little reaction? If I eat one small piece of gluten-free pizza, I'm fine, if I eat more maybe not? So many of us are so sensitive to so many things, that whenever you eat a processed food, it is not necessarily just gluten that we could be reacting to?

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