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StacyA

Giant Eagle Brand Egg Nog?

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I should have gone to a different store, but Giant Eagle is so close and I was already right in town taking my son to wrestling practice... Anyway, I bought a bunch of Giant Eagle brand egg nog, knowing that they don't label well and don't have info on their website and their nutritionist takes 3 days to email back an answer on if something is gluten-free. I tried googling within this site, but I didn't see any old threads that specifically mention Giant Eagle brand egg nog. Anyone know if it's gluten-free?

I already know that my Smirnoff Vanilla Vodka is gluten-free, and I'm READY TO MIX!!!

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What are the ingredients? I've yet to find an egg nog that has gluten, but that's not to say there isn't one.

richard

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What are the ingredients? I've yet to find an egg nog that has gluten, but that's not to say there isn't one.

richard

The only questionable ingredient is 'natural flavoring'. I'm not too worried, but you never know...

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While "natural flavors" can contain gluten, they very rarely actually do. The most likely source would be barley malt, and that is a relatively expensive ingredient, so it is usually explicitly declared as "malt flavor."

If there were wheat in it, in the US it would be required by law to be disclosed as just that, "wheat."

Shelly Case on flavorings:

It would be rare to find a "natural or artificial flavoring" containing gluten (a) because hydrolyzed wheat protein cannot be hidden under the term "flavor." and (B) barley malt extract is almost always declared as "barley malt extract" or "barley malt flavoring." For this reason, most experts do not restrict natural and artificial flavorings in the gluten-free diet.

Gluten-Free Diet - A Comprehensive Resource Guide, published 2008, page 46

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While "natural flavors" can contain gluten, they very rarely actually do. The most likely source would be barley malt, and that is a relatively expensive ingredient, so it is usually explicitly declared as "malt flavor."

If there were wheat in it, in the US it would be required by law to be disclosed as just that, "wheat."

Shelly Case on flavorings:

Thanks Peter and Richard! Happy Holidays.

- Stacy

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