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Need Help With My Results

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It was recommended that I have a celiac test after my brother was diagnosed about 2 months ago. I have an appointment in mid-Feb but would like to know more about my results. I am 47, 175lbs, my only medical health issues are migraines and problems maintaining calcium serum levels in my blood (tends to run high, so currently on a calcium blocker) I have had hypothyroid issues for years and was on medication for about 7 years-blood test have always been "normal" with or without medication and was prescribed 125mcg of Levothyroxin because I had most of the symptoms-fatigue, weight gain, loss of hair, etc. Dosage has always been based on symptoms. I eat very little processed food sticking mainly to meat, veg, and fruit. Christmas was an exception with cake and cookie season :)

Any insight you can give me is greatly appreciated.

Tissue Transaglutminase Ab, IgA Result: .6 Range: <7

Reticulin IgA Screen Negative

Gliadin Peptide Ab, IgG 8.6 H <7

Gliadin Peptide Ab, IgA 4.9 <7

Anti DNA, Native Dble Strand 10 H <5

SSA (Ro) Antibody IgG <.2 <1.0

SSB (La) Antibody IgG

Smith (ENA) Antibody SSA-Scleroderma findings the same

Ribonucleic Protein Ab, IgG

Scleroderma (SCL-70)

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Hi, only the antigliadin IgG test was positive, but to see i the IgA really was valid we need the number of the total IgA test.

Was the tissue transglutaminase IgG done? (in light of your antigliadin IgG numbers)

The antigliadin IgG was found to be the first sign of celiac in relatives of diagnosed celiacs who were tested for many years, to see which tests became positive over time.

If just one test is positive it still means there was a positive test. No need to have all of them positive. And, about 20-50% of celiacs will have negative tests. They have such a high cutoff 8to not to catch those with negative biopsies....)

You sound just like you have a parathyroid tumor.

Typical is high calcium and especially the hypothyroid symptoms.

Have you read at www.parathyroid.com?

You really need a sestamibi or what they call it scan by an experienced operator.

In case og parathyroid tumor, you will lose lots of calcium from your bones and teeth etc. and you have a risk of high blood pressure and stomach ulcer and depression. Aches and pains are typical too.

It just struck me that it could be your parathyroids.

nora

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Thank you for the reply, sadly that is all the test that were run. I will ask about the other test when I see my GP doctor in Feb. I've often wondered about the parathyroid problem but my old Dr. had refused to do any test, needless to say the Dr. I am seeing in Feb is new, I'm hoping that she is more up to date. My gynecologist had actually run the test for me and wasn't quite sure what to order since it is out of her range of expertise My reg GP had refused to do the celiac test as well, he said I was too healthy--good blood pressure, not malnourished (though I believe overweight people can be malnourished) and very low Chol panel, my Tri is around 48 overall Chol is 143.

Hi, only the antigliadin IgG test was positive, but to see i the IgA really was valid we need the number of the total IgA test.

Was the tissue transglutaminase IgG done? (in light of your antigliadin IgG numbers)

The antigliadin IgG was found to be the first sign of celiac in relatives of diagnosed celiacs who were tested for many years, to see which tests became positive over time.

If just one test is positive it still means there was a positive test. No need to have all of them positive. And, about 20-50% of celiacs will have negative tests. They have such a high cutoff 8to not to catch those with negative biopsies....)

You sound just like you have a parathyroid tumor.

Typical is high calcium and especially the hypothyroid symptoms.

Have you read at www.parathyroid.com?

You really need a sestamibi or what they call it scan by an experienced operator.

In case og parathyroid tumor, you will lose lots of calcium from your bones and teeth etc. and you have a risk of high blood pressure and stomach ulcer and depression. Aches and pains are typical too.

It just struck me that it could be your parathyroids.

nora

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39 % of newly diagnosed celiacs are over-weight or obese, or was it 39% obese, as oppsosed to only 5% underweight!

Your doctor has not read up on the subject.

Many doctors say you cannot possibly be celiac if you are not severely underweight and have cosntant runs.....that is so wrong.

Yes, overweight can also be in the beginning of celiac, and what happens is that the celiac is patchy.

Now the absorption of fatty acids gets poor and the body senses that and it grabs all the nutrients it can get ahold of and keeps them. The intestines are set to overdrive, or something like that.

The reason I asked about the total IgA or the tissue transglutaminase IgG is that if total IgA is low or lowish, then the IgA type tests are not valid. Not just celiac tests, but any igA type tests. You can explain that to the other doctor who ordered the tests, since that doctor was listening anyway.

Maybe get the ttg IgG done?

And, if you are not eating enough gluten the tests will be negaive or almost negative. And it takes a lot of gluten for the tests to show up positive, and that is in order not to get any false positives. For some reason, they do notwant false positives so they set the cutoff high.

There is also another very very specific test, that is the EMA test, endomysium antibody test. They actually have to look at it in a microscope in the dark. It is IgA type and I am not so sure if it is valid in case of low total IgA. I thought it might be anyway because they look at IgA in the tissue that has been incubated with the blood test of the patient. The tissue is not the patient's so the IgA won't matter when I think about it.

Low vitamin D , low b-12 and high liver numbers are other things typical for celiac.

The usual tests are:

tissue transglutaminase (ttg) IgA and IgG

antigliadin IgA and IgG

total IgA

endomysium antibodies, the microscope variant (sometimes labs just call the tissue trasglutaminase test for entdomysium antibody test but those are not the same, but I see them listed as the same sometimes...but that is misleading)

nora

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Thank you for the advice and the list of recommended test. I cut and pasted to take it with me when I go to my app in Feb. I live in a very rural area and I think often the local Drs. are so busy with the usual diabetic, high blood pressure and viruses that they often do not keep up with conditions outside that realm. I have heard good things about the GP I will be seeing and I hope that she will consider the test you recommended. Do you think I good eat a lot of gluten before having the test to get the most reliable results?

39 % of newly diagnosed celiacs are over-weight or obese, or was it 39% obese, as oppsosed to only 5% underweight!

Your doctor has not read up on the subject.

Many doctors say you cannot possibly be celiac if you are not severely underweight and have cosntant runs.....that is so wrong.

Yes, overweight can also be in the beginning of celiac, and what happens is that the celiac is patchy.

Now the absorption of fatty acids gets poor and the body senses that and it grabs all the nutrients it can get ahold of and keeps them. The intestines are set to overdrive, or something like that.

The reason I asked about the total IgA or the tissue transglutaminase IgG is that if total IgA is low or lowish, then the IgA type tests are not valid. Not just celiac tests, but any igA type tests. You can explain that to the other doctor who ordered the tests, since that doctor was listening anyway.

Maybe get the ttg IgG done?

And, if you are not eating enough gluten the tests will be negaive or almost negative. And it takes a lot of gluten for the tests to show up positive, and that is in order not to get any false positives. For some reason, they do notwant false positives so they set the cutoff high.

There is also another very very specific test, that is the EMA test, endomysium antibody test. They actually have to look at it in a microscope in the dark. It is IgA type and I am not so sure if it is valid in case of low total IgA. I thought it might be anyway because they look at IgA in the tissue that has been incubated with the blood test of the patient. The tissue is not the patient's so the IgA won't matter when I think about it.

Low vitamin D , low b-12 and high liver numbers are other things typical for celiac.

The usual tests are:

tissue transglutaminase (ttg) IgA and IgG

antigliadin IgA and IgG

total IgA

endomysium antibodies, the microscope variant (sometimes labs just call the tissue trasglutaminase test for entdomysium antibody test but those are not the same, but I see them listed as the same sometimes...but that is misleading)

nora

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About the gluten before the test, it usually takes a while to get high enough antibodies for the test.

Usually they recommend at least 6 weeks, better at least three months and 03 grams gluten per kg wieght.

Latest I read was they recommend 0,5 g gluten a day.

And time helps with a gluten challenge.

When they had children or teenagers on a gluten challenge (they used to do that before) they all relapsed with time.

So if the first tests are negative, don't give up, they likely will get positive.

That is, if you want a diagnosis.

(Enterolab does testing that is more sensitive, and detecs gluten intolerance earlier, but they cannot give a celiac diagnosis. And, your doctors most like won't acknowledge their test)

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One final question and I promise not to ask anymore :), I'm just so amazed at the amount of knowledge I've learned just in these few post with you that I was unable to learn anywhere on the web before finding this site. Is there any knowledge to be gained from the test that I had done earlier? Did the positive IgG or the Double Strand not give any indication of whether I have any gluten intolerance? I guess what I'm saying is I don't need to have a diagnosis of full blown celiac to change my eating habits but will do so if my test shows any intolerance or allergy. My family has a strong family history of colon cancer, on my mom's side we lost 2 uncles and 1 aunt within about 4 years, my mom is IBS and will be tested next month for celiac (evidently wasn't considered a candidate due to her weight until my brother's diagnosis) and on my father's side 4 aunts and uncles with lupus so for me it's more about prevention rather than possibly developing celiac and then perhaps any of the multitude of other problems that seem to come with it.

About the gluten before the test, it usually takes a while to get high enough antibodies for the test.

Usually they recommend at least 6 weeks, better at least three months and 03 grams gluten per kg wieght.

Latest I read was they recommend 0,5 g gluten a day.

And time helps with a gluten challenge.

When they had children or teenagers on a gluten challenge (they used to do that before) they all relapsed with time.

So if the first tests are negative, don't give up, they likely will get positive.

That is, if you want a diagnosis.

(Enterolab does testing that is more sensitive, and detecs gluten intolerance earlier, but they cannot give a celiac diagnosis. And, your doctors most like won't acknowledge their test)

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The biggest risk for having celiac is having a celiac in the family.

Sounds like the family members you mentioned could have celiac.

About the antigliadin IgG, google ford gluten and he explains that that test does mean something, and that those people really should go gluten free.

http://www.drrodneyford.com/index.php/20090208218/FAQ/Tests/blood-tests-to-diagnose-gluten-problems.html here he explains the differences between all the tests.

Now you have not had the deamidated gliadin test either. still some more things to check.

But the one that was positive does mean something. You have an immune reaction to gluten.

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