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What'S The Deal With Celiacs And Nightshades?

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Hi all, I am a celiac who experienced some relief on the gluten free diet, but I seem to have problems with nightshades. Even before I was diagnosed celiac I had some episodes of hives and becoming extremely ill after eating nightshades - red chili and egg plant seemed to be the worst.

I am wondering - is it common for celiacs to be intolerant to nightshades? Also, I am not entirely nightshade free as I find it hard to avoid potato. When avoiding nightshades is it necessary to avoid all potato as well to see relief?

My last thought - it is funny because when I was young I hated potatoes and tomatoes and milk with a passion. Have any of you found that foods you avoided as a kid ended up being a problem?

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Problems with nightshades does seem to be more common amongst the members here than say, the general population. IMHO, it is easy to understand once you know what makes a nightshade get that classification, and how Celiac effects the permeability of the intestines.

Nightshades have toxic alkaloids, which are in fact toxic to everyone. It is just that most people aren't effected by the amount which gets into the bloodstream. However, since Celiac damages the small intestine, creating what's often called "leaky gut", I believe this is allowing a higher amount of the toxins to pass into the bloodstream. Additionally, deficiencies in certain nutrients leave the body less capable of protecting itself and removing the toxins. For instance, magnesium deficiency is very common, and this mineral reinforces the blood/brain barrier. It is also vital for proper motor function, and over 300 enzymatic reactions. Vitamin B12 also aids in these things, not to mention numerous other bodily processes. The toxins in nightshades are known to effect motor function, so it seems clear to me why I had to eliminate nightshades from my diet.

As for whether or not a given individual could eat any potatoes at all, that's probably dependent on their level of sensitivity. It would only take one potato to put me in agony for about two weeks, so for me the amount is zero.

But you do have options. For instance, try taro root instead. It has a white, starchy inside like a potato, only a bit sweeter, and a hint of what many say tastes like water chestnut. I think the flavor is really good, if not better than potato. Taro can be boiled, mashed, fried, baked, and even made into chips. It is also what Hawaiians have traditionally used to make Poi. The dry land taro is white inside, while the wetland taro can be many different colors, even deep purple. Taro root can usually be found in Asian markets, or in the imported/exotic food section of many grocery stores.

In place of tomato sauce, try the product called Nomato.

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Problems with nightshades does seem to be more common amongst the members here than say, the general population. IMHO, it is easy to understand once you know what makes a nightshade get that classification, and how Celiac effects the permeability of the intestines.

Nightshades have toxic alkaloids, which are in fact toxic to everyone. It is just that most people aren't effected by the amount which gets into the bloodstream. However, since Celiac damages the small intestine, creating what's often called "leaky gut", I believe this is allowing a higher amount of the toxins to pass into the bloodstream. Additionally, deficiencies in certain nutrients leave the body less capable of protecting itself and removing the toxins. For instance, magnesium deficiency is very common, and this mineral reinforces the blood/brain barrier. It is also vital for proper motor function, and over 300 enzymatic reactions. Vitamin B12 also aids in these things, not to mention numerous other bodily processes. The toxins in nightshades are known to effect motor function, so it seems clear to me why I had to eliminate nightshades from my diet.

As for whether or not a given individual could eat any potatoes at all, that's probably dependent on their level of sensitivity. It would only take one potato to put me in agony for about two weeks, so for me the amount is zero.

But you do have options. For instance, try taro root instead. It has a white, starchy inside like a potato, only a bit sweeter, and a hint of what many say tastes like water chestnut. I think the flavor is really good, if not better than potato. Taro can be boiled, mashed, fried, baked, and even made into chips. It is also what Hawaiians have traditionally used to make Poi. The dry land taro is white inside, while the wetland taro can be many different colors, even deep purple. Taro root can usually be found in Asian markets, or in the imported/exotic food section of many grocery stores.

In place of tomato sauce, try the product called Nomato.

Thank you Rice guy! This seems to make sense. At this time, I am not sure if I am reacting to potato. I know that most nightshades bug me, but I have eliminated all but potato and I do not have joint pain. I actually have an duodenal ulcer and am wondering if the potato consumption is contributing to my recurrent ulcers.

I will try the taro that sounds like a good alternative. My husband likes to make soup and asked me what to use as a thickener. I hope that I can find that at the supermarket as I do live in a small town, but I am thinking with a little digging I could find it somewhere around.

I have not tried the nomato, but I did find a recipe to something similar and made up a batch. It is good so far!

Thanks,

Carla

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My last thought - it is funny because when I was young I hated potatoes and tomatoes and milk with a passion. Have any of you found that foods you avoided as a kid ended up being a problem?

I hated bread, especially hot dog buns, yucky!

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I hated rolled oats, wheat porridge, and barley in soups.

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I hated bread, especially hot dog buns, yucky!

My sister was recently diagnosed and she hated sandwiches growing up. Everyone said to her - how can you hate sandwiches?

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am wondering - is it common for celiacs to be intolerant to nightshades? Also, I am not entirely nightshade free as I find it hard to avoid potato. When avoiding nightshades is it necessary to avoid all potato as well to see relief?

I've had no problems with nightshades. Peppers, eggplant, and potatoes are a regular part of my diet. I eat tomatoes once in a while... don't care for them much unless they're cooked well or made into a sauce.

Do you soak your eggplant prior to cooking?

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I've had no problems with nightshades. Peppers, eggplant, and potatoes are a regular part of my diet. I eat tomatoes once in a while... don't care for them much unless they're cooked well or made into a sauce.

Do you soak your eggplant prior to cooking?

Hi Woodnewt, I don't soak eggplant because that is the one nightshade that I actually got allergic facial swelling from so I have stayed away. Maybe I should have soaked it first:) I believe that eggplant is high in histimines and I am a very allergic reactive person so I truly believe the large dose of it may have caused my allergic reaction.

It is good to know that nightshades avoidance and celiac disease don't necessarily go together. There is hope for me once my gut heals that I might be able to eat them.

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I have tomatoes and peppers with almost every meal. I eat eggplant several times a month. I have no problems with nightshades.

It may be that people with Celiac/GI aren't more sensitive to some foods, just more aware of their bodies.

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Hi all, I am a celiac who experienced some relief on the gluten free diet, but I seem to have problems with nightshades. Even before I was diagnosed celiac I had some episodes of hives and becoming extremely ill after eating nightshades - red chili and egg plant seemed to be the worst.

I am wondering - is it common for celiacs to be intolerant to nightshades? Also, I am not entirely nightshade free as I find it hard to avoid potato. When avoiding nightshades is it necessary to avoid all potato as well to see relief?

My last thought - it is funny because when I was young I hated potatoes and tomatoes and milk with a passion. Have any of you found that foods you avoided as a kid ended up being a problem?

I grew up on potatoes and tomatoes among other nightshades. Hate to give them up but as I have rheumatoid arthritis in addition to my celiac I have found I have to stay away from them at all cost. If I eat anything from the nightshade family I can pretty much count on not being able to walk, grasp, stand or any other reasonable activity without a severe increase in gel time for a week or so after ingesting the guilty party. Avoiding them is part of an anti inflammatory diet recommended for sufferers of RA. Once I removed them from my diet as well as going strictly gluten-free my rheumatoid arthritis started to melt away. From barely being able to stand and walk to being able to go back into the shop and doing metal fabrication was a substantial change for me. I miss them but then again I don't. I am sure there are may who can tolerate them. Good for them. I can't and so I no longer even try. Just not worth all the pain.

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Hi Woodnewt, I don't soak eggplant because that is the one nightshade that I actually got allergic facial swelling from so I have stayed away. Maybe I should have soaked it first:) I believe that eggplant is high in histimines and I am a very allergic reactive person so I truly believe the large dose of it may have caused my allergic reaction.

It is good to know that nightshades avoidance and celiac disease don't necessarily go together. There is hope for me once my gut heals that I might be able to eat them.

Facial swelling sounds like you do have a serious problem with eggplant at the very least, and it probably would be a good idea to avoid. A relative of mine gets a very bad rash if he touches the flesh of (peeled) raw round eggplants but he is able to eat them without problem if they are soaked and cooked well. He does not get rash from touching the long thin eggplants. I only mentioned the soaking because my grandparents taught me to soak them from when I was young and I have found out over the years that a lot of people do not soak eggplant before it is cooked. I do not know what the exact reason for the soaking is, but being that they told me it removed "toxins" I never questioned what I was taught and will never eat eggplant unsoaked.

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...

I will try the taro that sounds like a good alternative. My husband likes to make soup and asked me what to use as a thickener. I hope that I can find that at the supermarket as I do live in a small town, but I am thinking with a little digging I could find it somewhere around.

I have not tried the nomato, but I did find a recipe to something similar and made up a batch. It is good so far!

Thanks,

Carla

Hey Carla,

You can use about any starch to thicken a soup. Rice flour or corn flour, corn starch, etc. If you wanted to add some fiber as well as thickening you could add some psyillium husks or flax seed meal. Another thickener you could use is okra. well boiled sweet potatoes can be mashed up and thicken a soup, or pea flour or mashed up cooked peas too. Hmm, maybe it's time to make some sweet potato soup again...

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Of all the nightshades that I've tried, potatos are the worst for me, but I haven't tried eggplant since going on a restricted diet. For a potato substitute, I use either yams (the orange ones) or sweet potatoes (the white ones) both with great success. I tolerate them really well.

Jana

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Thank you Rice guy! This seems to make sense. At this time, I am not sure if I am reacting to potato. I know that most nightshades bug me, but I have eliminated all but potato and I do not have joint pain. I actually have an duodenal ulcer and am wondering if the potato consumption is contributing to my recurrent ulcers.

I will try the taro that sounds like a good alternative. My husband likes to make soup and asked me what to use as a thickener. I hope that I can find that at the supermarket as I do live in a small town, but I am thinking with a little digging I could find it somewhere around.

I have not tried the nomato, but I did find a recipe to something similar and made up a batch. It is good so far!

Thanks,

Carla

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Thank you Rice guy! This seems to make sense. At this time, I am not sure if I am reacting to potato. I know that most nightshades bug me, but I have eliminated all but potato and I do not have joint pain. I actually have an duodenal ulcer and am wondering if the potato consumption is contributing to my recurrent ulcers.

I will try the that sounds like a good alternative. My husband likes to make soup and asked me what to use as a thickener. I hope that I can find that at the supermarket as I do live in a small town, but I am thinking with a little digging I could find it somewhere around.

I have not tried the nomato, but I did find a recipe to something similar and made up a batch. It is good so far!

Thanks,

Carla

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