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Myooshka

Need Tips For Making Kitchen Gluten Free

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Hi we suspect Celiac in our two year old even though his tests are negative so far. There is a family history of Celiac. Can you please share tips on how to make my kitchen gluten free and to avoid cross contamination? I am guessing throwing out my toaster and getting a new one would be a good start. What other household tools for the kitchen should I be getting rid of?(Plastic spatulas, plastic measuring cups, etc?) An y comments appreciated. Thanks

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The things to really watch out for are surface texture and porosity. If the surface isn't smooth, gluten can hang on more easily, and cleaning it is more difficult. So things like cast iron pans, wooden utensils and cutting boards, scratched non-stick cookware, etc, are of the sort that can harbor gluten. Smooth-surfaced items such as stainless steel pans, glass bakeware, plates and bowls without chips or scratches, etc should clean up just fine. Plastics which are smooth, not scratched, I'd think should be ok once cleaned properly. Some containers have removable seals inside the covers, and in that case, removing and cleaning them should be a given.

Also, colanders and strainers can be difficult to clean. You'll have to judge for yourself on each item, whether or not there's too great a risk. Again, it depends on how easily it can be cleaned. Every strainer I've ever seen is basically a mesh of interwoven wires. Thus every intersection in the mesh is a place for particles to collect. I'd never trust a strainer that had been used for wheat pasta, no matter how clean it looks.

Beaters, mixers, blenders, food processors, etc, can all have tiny nooks and crannies. Again, it's a judgment call, based on the specifics of the design of the item. Some blender blades are comprised of two pieces, one over the other, oriented 90 degrees from each other. The interface between those blades can be tough to clean. Others are a single piece of metal, so there's no crevice involved. However, both designs have a shaft underneath the blade, extending down through a bearing. It is at that interface where food particles can collect, and are often difficult to remove.

Forget trying to clean a flour sifter or toaster. These items can't generally be dismantled, and there are countless places where gluten can hide. Not only that, but these items are customarily used for wheat products, so there's really no question that they'd be very contaminated.

Clean out the fridge, pantry and cupboard shelves thoroughly, paying particular attention to the corners. If the shelves are removable, that will make your job easier by far. Otherwise it can be tough getting all those little crumbs out of all the crevices.

I'm sure others will chime in with things I've neglected to mention.

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You can buy most things at the dollar store. I bought 2 new waffle irons at Walmart for 10 bucks each...one for my house and one for my dd's apt.

Also, keep your toaster covered.

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Hi we suspect Celiac in our two year old even though his tests are negative so far. There is a family history of Celiac. Can you please share tips on how to make my kitchen gluten free and to avoid cross contamination? I am guessing throwing out my toaster and getting a new one would be a good start. What other household tools for the kitchen should I be getting rid of?(Plastic spatulas, plastic measuring cups, etc?) An y comments appreciated. Thanks

Good answers, above!

A quick question: Are you planning on making your kitchen completely gluten-free? That is, you will not be preparing any gluten items whatsoever?

I ask because I spoke with someone recently who purchased a new toaster thinking that it would be easier to "clean" after her family makes wheat toast.

You probably know this already, but whatever toaster you use for gluten-free toasting needs to be dedicated gluten-free only.

A dedicated can opener is a good idea, too.

Blender: I had good luck running it in the dishwasher for 10-15 minutes (I set a timer), then I take it out and hand rinse and dry it. This seemed to help really clean out the blade -- better than just blending soap and water in it.

I do the same with chef knives where I question if they may have been glutened -- sharp blades should not be run through the dishwasher. I make sure I get them out quickly -- maybe five minutes. Rinse and dry by hand.

This works best if you have a plastic silverware holder in your dishwasher. It is important to put the knife in a section by itself, and try to place it so it doesn't knock against anything as the water jets hit it.

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Cast iron pans can be put in the oven on self-clean cycle. Makes a dusty mess but does a good job. Rinse and clean everything well. Reseason according to manufacturer's directions-coat in oil, put in oven again. Dedicate to gluten-free only.

Deep fryers with teflon or non-stick coating need to be replaced.

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Cast iron pans can be put in the oven on self-clean cycle. Makes a dusty mess but does a good job. Rinse and clean everything well. Reseason according to manufacturer's directions-coat in oil, put in oven again. Dedicate to gluten-free only.

Deep fryers with teflon or non-stick coating need to be replaced.

Thank-you for all of the great ideas and tips. My husband and I are going to go gluten free as well as it will be much easier to not risk any gluten contamination, as we really want to see our son improve. Thank-you

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Thank-you for all of the great ideas and tips. My husband and I are going to go gluten free as well as it will be much easier to not risk any gluten contamination, as we really want to see our son improve. Thank-you

Everyone's covered what I would have said, but I wanted to commend you and your husband for going gluten-free with your son. That's awesome. :) My husband fully supported making our kitchen gluten-free and it's meant the world to me.

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Everyone's covered what I would have said, but I wanted to commend you and your husband for going gluten-free with your son. That's awesome. :) My husband fully supported making our kitchen gluten-free and it's meant the world to me.

I agree! Good for you! I wish my family were as supportive (they're good, but they're not willing to go gluten free just yet).

I hope you'll keep posting and keep us updated as to your experiences in making your kitchen gluten-free. Bravo!

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