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Enterolab Results,

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Name: King, Tanya

A) Gluten Sensitivity Stool and Gene Panel Complete *Best test/best value

Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA: 5 Units

Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA: 2 Units

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: Less than 300 Units

Fecal Anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA: 2 Units

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1: 0301

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2: 0301

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 7,7)

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA (Normal Range is less than 10 Units): Intestinal antigliadin IgA antibody was below the upper limit of normal, and hence there is no direct evidence of active gluten sensitivity from this test. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, and some people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have a syndrome or symptoms known to be associated with gluten sensitivity, a gluten-free diet may help you despite a negative test. If you have no syndrome or symptoms associated with gluten sensitivity, you can follow a gluten-containing healthy diet and retest in 3-5 years; or you may opt to go gluten-free as a purely preventive measure.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA (Normal Range is less than 10 Units): The level of intestinal IgA antibodies to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase was below the upper limit of normal, and hence, there is no evidence of a gluten-induced autoimmune reaction.

Interpretation of Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score (Normal Range is less than 300 Units): Provided that dietary fat is being ingested, a fecal fat score less than 300 indicates there is no malabsorbed dietary fat in stool indicating that digestion and absorption of nutrients is currently normal.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA (Normal Range is less than 10 Units): Levels of fecal IgA antibody to a food antigen greater than or equal to 10 are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic "sensitivity" to that food. For any elevated fecal antibody level, it is recommended to remove that food from your diet. Values less than 10 indicate there currently is minimal or no reaction to that food and hence, no direct evidence of food sensitivity to that specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test.

Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: Although you do not possess the main HLA-DQB1 genes predisposing to celiac sprue (HLA-DQB1*0201 or HLA-DQB1*0302), HLA gene analysis reveals that you have two copies of a gene that predisposes to gluten sensitivity (any DQ1, DQ2 not by HLA-DQB1*0201, or DQ3 not by HLA-DQB1*0302). Having two copies of a gluten sensitive gene means that each of your parents and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of the gene. Two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity may be more severe.

For more information about result interpretation, please see http://www.enterolab.com/StaticPages/Faq_Result_Interpretation.htm

Stool Analysis performed by: Frederick Ogunji, Ph.D., EnteroLab

Molecular Gene Analysis performed by: American Red Cross

Interpretation of all results by: Kenneth D. Fine, M.D., EnteroLab

Thank You For Allowing EnteroLab to Help You Attain Optimum Intestinal And Overall Health.

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Have you had standard blood tests for celiac yet? A full panel would include a total IGA, that would let you know if the testing had a good chance of being a false negative. I think your doctor would also do the IGG test in the panel. Sometimes if the person is IGA deficient that test will still show a positive.

If you have symptoms I would do as they advise and do a trial of the diet anyway, unless you are planning on having either your GP or GI do further testing.

In additon I am assuming that you were on a full gluten diet when you were tested. If you gluten free or gluten light that can also cause a false negative. If your not consuming gluten your body will not be making the antibodies and the blood and stool tests would come back negative.

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Have you had standard blood tests for celiac yet? A full panel would include a total IGA, that would let you know if the testing had a good chance of being a false negative. I think your doctor would also do the IGG test in the panel. Sometimes if the person is IGA deficient that test will still show a positive.

If you have symptoms I would do as they advise and do a trial of the diet anyway, unless you are planning on having either your GP or GI do further testing.

In additon I am assuming that you were on a full gluten diet when you were tested. If you gluten free or gluten light that can also cause a false negative. If your not consuming gluten your body will not be making the antibodies and the blood and stool tests would come back negative.

yes i did have a blood test ,transgluta something which was possitive.

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yes i did have a blood test ,transgluta something which was possitive.

Have you done a strict trial of the diet? If you haven't you should.

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Have you done a strict trial of the diet? If you haven't you should.

could i still have it despite the enterolab result?

Tanya.

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could i still have it despite the enterolab result?

Tanya.

anyone?

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No lab test is perfect. The only true test is how your body feels.

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